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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: S. L. Krishnamurthy, S. K. Sharma, D. K. Sharma, P. C. Sharma, Y. P. Singh, V. K. Mishra, D. Burman, B. Maji, B. K. Bandyopadhyay, S. Mandal, S. K. Sarangi, R. K. Gautam, P. K. Singh, K. K. Manohara, B. C. Marandi, D. P. Singh, G. Padmavathi, P. B. Vanve, K. D. Patil, S. Thirumeni, O. P. Verma, A. H. Khan, S. Tiwari, M. Shakila, A. M. Ismail, G. B. Gregorio, and R. K. Singh

Genotype × environment (G × E) interaction effects are of special interest for identifying the most suitable genotypes with respect to target environments, representative locations and other specific stresses. Twenty-two advanced breeding lines contributed by the national partners of the Salinity Tolerance Breeding Network (STBN) along with four checks were evaluated across 12 different salt affected sites comprising five coastal saline and seven alkaline environments in India. The study was conducted to assess the G × E interaction and stability of advanced breeding lines for yield and yield components using additive main effects and multiplicative interaction (AMMI) model. In the AMMI1 biplot, there were two mega-environments (ME) includes ME-A as CARI, KARAIKAL, TRICHY and NDUAT with winning genotype CSR 2K 262; and ME-B as KARSO, LUCKN, KARSA, GOA, CRRI, DRR, BIHAR and PANVE with winning genotypes CSR 36. Genotypes CSR 2K 262, CSR 27, NDRK 11-4, NDRK 11-3, NDRK 11-2, CSR 2K 255 and PNL 1-1-1-6-7-1 were identified as specifically adapted to favorable locations. The stability and adaptability of AMMI indicated that the best yielding genotypes were CSR 2K 262 for both coastal saline and alkaline environments and CSR 36 for alkaline environment. CARI and PANVEL were found as the most discernible environments for genotypic performance because of the greatest GE interaction. The genotype CSR 36 is specifically adapted to coastal saline environments GOA, KARSO, DRR, CRRI and BIHAR and while genotype CSR 2K 262 adapted to alkaline environments LUCKN, NDUAT, TRICH and KARAI. Use of most adapted lines could be used directly as varieties. Using them as donors for wide or specific adaptability with selection in the target environment offers the best opportunity for widening the genetic base of coastal salinity and alkalinity stress tolerance and development of adapted genotypes. Highly stable genotypes can improve the rice productivity in salt-affected areas and ensure livelihood of the resource poor farming communities.

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Brown planthopper (BPH) is one of the destructive insect pests causing significant yield losses in rice. BPH causes direct damage to the rice plants by sucking the sap from phloem, causing hopper burn and transmitting viral diseases like grassy and ragged stunt viruses. Several resistant donors have been identified from time to time, but the new biotypes of the pest arise to defeat the extended use of resistance genes in a single variety. This necessitates the regular identification of new resistant donors along with their nature of inheritance and gene action controlling the resistance. Knowing the inheritance pattern, gene action and number of genes controlling a trait helps the plant breeders to plan the effective breeding approaches for crop improvement. The present investigation was hence carried out to know the inheritance pattern, gene action and number of genes controlling BPH resistance in newly identified sources. The results indicated that the BPH resistance in PHS 29 genotype is under the control of single recessive gene. Whereas, it is controlled by two recessive genes in MRST 3 genotype. This reveals that relatively higher population size will be required to recover desirable segregants in the segregating populations involving MRST 3 genotype as one of the parents as compared to that involving PHS 29 genotype as parent. Since, the resistance in both the cases being recessive in nature, the trait will hence show significant additive effect, indicating that pure line development will be desirable for improvement of such a trait.

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The role of antibiosis components and antioxidant defense of rice genotypes, namely CR3006-8-2, RP4918-221, KAUM182-1, T12, IHRT-ME-25, W1263, Ptb33 (resistant check) and TN1 (susceptible check) was studied by phenotyping them against brown planthopper (BPH). Three genotypes, namely KAUM182-1, RP4918-221 and CR3006-8-2 were resistant to BPH and significantly low damage score (1.97–3.00); honeydew excretion area (46.76–49.64 mm2); nymphal survival (60.60–66.40%) and growth index (2.98–3.86) was recorded on them. Higher constitutive and induced level of soluble phenolics, peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase was observed in resistant genotypes without and with BPH infestation. A negative relationship between honeydew excretion, nymphal emergence, growth index and nymphal survival was observed with these biochemical constituents. Likewise, a reverse trend was observed between nymphal development period and biochemical constituents. These genotypes have emerged as a new source of resistance to BPH which can be used in hybridization programme to breed durable BPH resistant rice varieties.

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Aerobic adaptation could be an important modification in the traditional rice to cope up with the increasing water scarcity problem. Identification of stable QTL for traits promoting adaptation to aerobic conditions can facilitate the development of water-efficient aerobic rice varieties with better yields. Filial and backcross populations derived from the crosses between high-yielding low-land (HKR47) and aerobic (MAS26) indica rice varieties, were evaluated for various physio-morphological traits including root traits (in case of net house evaluation). Under aerobic field conditions, grain yield per plant showed significant positive correlation with plant height, effective number of tillers/plant and panicle length in all the populations. Grain yield per plant also showed positive correlation with root length in both filial populations and with fresh and dry root weight in F2 population. Two parental rice varieties displayed polymorphism at 125 of the 803 SSR loci, which were used to map the QTL associated with traits promoting aerobic adaptation. A total of 14 QTL were detected, 10 of them were identified on chromosome 8. Study led to the identification of a number of promising plants with higher grain yield, better root length/biomass under managed aerobic conditions and possessing most of the identified QTL.

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: M. Oszvald, S. Tömösközi, L. Tamás, and F. Békés

16 Gujral, H.S. & Rosell, C.M. (2004): Improvement of bread making quality of rice flour by glucose oxidase. Fd Res. int. , 37 , 75

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Adigbo, S.O., Okeleye, K.A., Adigbo, V.B. 2007. Performance of upland rice fitted into lowland rice-vegetable/cowpea sequence in rain-fed inland valley. Agron. J. 99 :377

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Okioma, S. N. M., Muchoki, R. N., Gathuru, E. M. 1983: Alternate hosts of rice yellow mottle virus in the lake Victoria basin in Kenya. Tropical Pest Management , 29 , 295

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: Xue-Gang Chen, Shuang-Shuang Lv, Ping-Ping Zhang, Lu Zhang, and Ying Ye

Introduction Rice, sharing equal importance with wheat, is one of the major crops grown throughout the world. Rice is the principal staple food and nourishment for the world’s population. Rice hull, or rice husk, is the milling

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Thermal degradation of rice husks on a pilot plant

Utilization of the products as adsorbents for oil spill cleanup

Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: S. Genieva, S. Turmanova, A. Dimitrov, P. Petkov, and L. Vlaev

Introduction Rice husks are an important by-product of rice milling process and are major waste product of the agricultural industry. According to the statistical data of Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the world

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217 Khabiruddin, M., Gupta, S. N., Tyagi, C. S. (2002): Nutritional composition of some improved genotypes of rice bean (Vigna umbellata) . Forage Res. , 28 , 104

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