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worth noting that this increasing preference for the vernacular in Welsh charms, especially those that feature religious narrative or references, coincides with the earliest translations of the Bible into Welsh and a generally increasing interest in the

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has been found that their frequency can be used to statistically distinguish, for example, text types ( Stubbs and Barth 2003 ), or texts (two German Bible translations) ( Shrefler 2011 ). Moreover, 4-gram classifiers are highly successful in

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, which suggests the superiority of Polish soldiers over others. Besides, Dembołęcki attempts to convince his readers that the Lisovchiks changed after they gained another name: ‘elears’. Dembołęcki believed that the new name might have come from the Bible

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‒ red as the rose piros mint a karmazsin ‒ red as the crimson/kermes bíborpiros ‒ magenta (literally: purple red) (in the earliest complete Hungarian translation of the Bible ‒ dating from 1590 ‒ this color term appears 27 times), etc. Furthermore

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establishes a fruitful connection with a diverse range of textual traditions, from the Bible through mystery plays, fables and herbaria to contemporary works ( Mellár, 2018 ). The loose string of phytoaphorisms, phytoicons, phytoenigma, phytolegends, and

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. Malden, MA & Oxford : Wiley-Blackwell . 401 – 434 . Fejes , László and Péter Rebrus 2017 . Vegyes hangrendű tövek a Károli-bibliában [Mixed roots in the Károli Bible] . Paper presented at Nyelvelmélet és dialektológia 4. – A Károli

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argumentation on what is prohibited and what is allowed in magical and superstitious activities. Their sources were also similar: they used the Bible, as well as the writings of Saint Augustine, Saint Isidor of Seville, Saint Thomas Aquinas, and Jean Gerson, the

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Acta Orientalia Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Authors: Imre Galambos, Gergely Salát, Csaba Prutkay, Imre Hamar, Péter Vámos, and Anna Pikó

Xixing, Lu: 'Shijing' yiwen yanjiu (The Study of Textual Variants of the Shijing) Hamar, Imre: A Religious Leader in the Tang: Chengguan's Biography Qian, Nanxiu: Spirit and Self in Medieval China. The Shih-shuo hsin-yü and Its Legacy Chen, Jinhua: Making and Remaking History. A Study of Tiantai Sectarian Historiography Nozaki, Akira-Baker, Chris (eds): Village Communities, State and Traders. Essays in Honour of Chatthip Nartsupha Gottfried von Laimbeckhoven SJ (1707-1787) Der Bischof von Nanjing und seine Briefe aus China mit Faksimile seiner Reisebeschreibung. Transkribiert und bearbeitet von Stephan Puhl (1941-1997), und Sigismund Freiherr von Elverfeldt-Ulm unter Mitwirkung von Gerhard Zeilinger. Zum Druck vorbereitet und herausgegeben von Roman Malek SVD Zetzsche, Jost Oliver: The Bible in China: The History of the Union Version or The Culmination of Protestant Missionary Bible Translation in China Xinran: The Good Women of China. Hidden Voices. Translated by Esther Tyldesley

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This paper analyzes the spiritual background of the Mura Region Slovenian priest Števan Küzmič’a (1723–1779) oeuvre, especially the circumstances and sources of his translation of the Bible, looking for the answer if he really translated the New Testament from Greek as it is stated in the title. Hungarian Calvinists were provided with two translations of the Bible when the Slovenian version was made, thanks to György Bárány and János Szabó Sartorius. The structure, content and message of the forewords written by József Torkos to Števan Küzmič’s Slovenian and András Torkos’s Hungarian translation of the Bible is similar. In Küzmič’s case the use of Hungarian patterns can be proved by borrowings from Hungarian, word formation based on Hungarian models as well as Hungarian governments and idioms. Števan Küzmič aimed at the purity of the Mura Region language but he had to borrow also from other languages to translate the complex Biblical text properly. He created a great work for Slovenians, raising the Mura Region Slovenian onto the level of a standard language.

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The present paper deals with the functioning of phraseological comparative constructions with biblical characters in dialects of East, West, and South Slavic languages. The charac- ters of the Holy Scripture include not only the nameless and named heroes of the Bible but also the Creator himself as well as supernatural beings that serve or oppose the Creator. The description involves comparative phraseological units with an adjective that derives from a character of the Bible. Most of the analyzed Slavic dialectal phraseological units are fixed in dictionaries.

The description of comparative phraseological units (if possible) is carried out from the positions of structural and semantic modelling, which allows to identify the lexical variation of components in the dialects of the same language or in various languages. In some cases, the paper includes areal characteristics of comparative constructions. For this purpose, the author shows their parallels in other linguistic and dialect regions. As a result, the paper reveals both structural and semantic biblical universals and phraseological units with national specificity, i.e. similes that have no equivalents (literary or non-Slavic). There are units that are specific for some regions, for example, phraseological units containing microtoponyms such as geographical objects that are not widely known. The national and regional identity is manifested both at the level of figurative basis and at the level of non- equivalent comparativism since some subjects can be active in one language, while they are peripheral or lacunary in another one.

In some cases, phraseological units are provided with cultural, historical, and etymol- ogical comments which reveal not only the biblical and religious roots but also reflect the ancient mythological representations of the Slavs. The author gives an explanation to the meaning of similes and their components.

The Old and New Testaments are a common element of the spiritual culture of Chris- tians so the comparison reveals the similarity and repetition of comparative units, directly or indirectly related to the names of the characters of the Bible, or structural and semantic models in a particular area. At the same time, the phraseological units genetically ascending to the Bible show a quite large differentiation, demonstrating the peculiarity of the recep- tion of biblical images by the Slavs, the unequal interest in them. Although the very name of the biblical character is often international, set similes containing it are not always the same. This is usually the case for pseudo-biblical phraseological units that have no direct links to the character of the Bible; they are usually inherent in folk speech and are often jokingly ironic. This is particularly evident in dialects.

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