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migration, it is suggested that the carbonaceous material records the maximum temperature reached during burial, and the large pyrite crystals grew in the course of the uplift following oil migration to the reservoir. There are several subsequent

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An anthropomorphic bronze vessel was recovered from a cremation burial of the Budaújlak cemetery section of the canabae’s western cemetery by Bécsi Road in Budapest. The other grave goods from the burial were three light coloured handled jugs, a silver T brooch lacking the pin, a strongly corroded iron belt buckle (?) and bronze fragments that probably came from a small casket. According to the anthropological examination, the few calcinated bone fragments from the burial suggest that the deceased had been a “probably adult man”.

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A female burial of the Conquest period came to light on the outskirts of Tiszapüspöki, a settlement lying north of Szolnok, during the salvage excavations preceding the construction of the M4 Motorway. The west to east oriented burial was disturbed by a ditch and during the mechanical humus removal. Lying beside the skeletal remains were a pair of tinned bronze braid ornaments, a bracelet of sheet bronze, beads, the fragment of an iron awl and a bone bead. The burial and its finds can be dated to the 10th century.

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Abstract  

Low-density polyethylene (LDPE) blended with poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) and additivated with pro-oxidant were soil buried for 180 days and characterized using thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). TG data showed that both onset and maximum rate degradation temperatures decreased as a function of biodegradation time. Apparent activation energies (E a) using the Broido integral method decreased with the burial time increasing. PE crystallinity degree values increased in general up to 2 months of biodegradation. At the end of the soil burial (SB) test these values decreased principally for samples that were previously thermo-oxidized in an oven.

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. A. & Khokhlova , O. S. , 2003 . Biomorphic indicators of humaninduced transformation of soils under early nomad burial mounds in southern Russia . Revistas Mexicana de Ciencias Geológics. 20 . ( 3 ) 283 – 288

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In the past decades researchers examining burial customs have recognised local phenomena pointing to the cultural diversity of the Avar population inhabiting the Carpathian Basin. Thus it has been proposed that several groups of different traditions and cultures may have coexisted in the territory of the Avars. In the recently excavated 7th–8th-century Avar cemeteries near Szekszárd (Szekszárd-Tószegidűlő, Tolna-Mözs-Fehérvize-dűlő) another — already known (Szekszárd-Bogyiszlói út és Gyönk-Vásártér út cemetery) — characteristic phenomenon was observed that can now be regarded as a regional feature. The paper discusses this burial type - which has recently also been found in great numbers in the cemetery of Tolna-Mözs —, namely the empty graves containing no human remains. Empty burials have been known in cemeteries of the Avar Age, however, their number is usually insignificant compared to the total number of graves. The aim of this paper is to analyse the possible reasons for empty graves and to show that they were the result of a conscious custom, most probably intended as symbolic burials.

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The analysis of three small hieratic papyrus fragments coming from a secondary burial place (Tomb B) in the outer courtyard of TT 32 shows that the otherwise rare custom of attaching the papyrus to the outer surfaces of mummy linen via a resinous substance was not only occurring in Ptolemaic Akhmim but is thus attested in Thebes too.

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Coffin Text Spell 440 is one of a number of texts recited during the funeral of the early Middle Kingdom. It consists of three parts, the first introducing the deceased, the second addressing the two mourning women accompanying the coffin and the third closing the burial.

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Contrary to earlier assumptions, the rich burial in qurgan no. 3 at Üc Tepe cannot be the inhumation of a Sabir or Avar warrior or that of a Persian officer. According to the testimony of the inscribed golden signet ring, whose legend runs as follows: Silig i abarzeniganbed “Silig the commander of the guards of the royal tent”, the burial belonged to a Turk nobleman, Silig by name, who entered the service of Xusro I Šahanšah and was appointed by him to commander of the guards of his general headquarters. The Karnamag of Xusro I mentions two settlements of Turkic tribes in Iran in 540/541 A.D. and 568 A.D. Very likely it was the latter one in the course of which the Turk chief entered the military service of the Persian king.

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Buried soils are grouped into three categories, namely Holocene soils, Pleistocene ones and those of earlier geologic periods. Buried soils mainly occur on floodplains and in sandy areas in Hungary. Gradual subsidence of the lowland areas and irrationally high rate of deforestation in the catchment regions have resulted in the burial of soils with younger deposits in the floodplain areas; most of the soils buried here are black hydromorphic ones. The major cause of burial in the sandy areas, however, is repeated deposition of the shifting sand. Climatic changes and the beginning cultivation of the originally grassland and forest areas have resulted in the movement and redeposition of the sandy deposits. Most of the Pleistocene-age paleosols have come to light in loess profiles. They can be regarded as remnants of forest soils with varying humus profiles and serve as excellent stratigraphic markers in studies of loess deposits.

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