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As testified by a fragment, which survived in the oeuvre of Charisius, a grammarian from the late Antiquity, L. Annaeus Cornutus dedicated his critical work on Virgil to Silius Italicus, the author of the epic entitled Punica, who belonged to Nero's circle of literati in his youth. Given the knowledge of the history of Nero's literary circle and the findings of a careful examination of the fragment, it can be assumed that this work of Cornutus, which might have been quoted by Pliny the Elder in his Dubius sermo, was probably written and published in the early 60s (A.D.).

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Augustus in der Hirtenwelt

Die Darstellung des idealen Herrschers in der neulateinischen Bukolik

Acta Antiqua Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Author: Lajos Zoltán Simon

In the early modern age, pastoral poetry became a current genre of the praise of rulers, kings and emperors. In spite of its overwhelming richness and contemporaneous importance, this branch of the bucolic genre has received relatively little attention from researchers. Even in comprehensive works on the history of the genre, one often finds hasty remarks, e.g. that these panegyric poems were foremost influenced by Vergil’s Eclogue 4.

The present paper offers a short overview of the immense diversity of the genre, paying great attention not only to Vergil, but also to the decisive influence of Calpurnius Siculus, Sannazaro and Baptista Mantuanus, as well as to the techniques of the Kreuzung der Gattungen, mainly to the interaction between pastoral and epic poetry. The analysis shows that, in spite of the huge variety of forms and the large distances in time and space, the image of the ideal emperor is surprisingly constant, and that the picture of the mythical Golden Age is almost completely drawn with the motives of the idealized reign of Augustus taken from epic poetry.

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Lucanus epikus technikájának jellemző jegye az istenapparátus hiánya. A jelenség magyarázatára az utóbbi bő évszázadban számos magyarázat született. Egy részük nem annyira az istenapparátus hiányáról beszél, mint inkább arról, hogy a költő az epikus narratíva e transzcendens aspektusát a hagyományos istenek helyett a teljesen személytelen fatum mal s a hol filozófikusan (fortuna), hol mintegy istenségként felfogott Fortuná val helyettesíti. A modern elméletek már Lucanus költői látásmódjának újszerűségével magyarázzák a jelenséget. Az istenapparátus hiánya azonban csak egyike azon tüneteknek, melyeknek mindegyike jól magyarázható a szónoki munkamódszerrel, a retorikai narratio szabályainak követésével.

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Abstract  

Dante’s Commedia and Goethe’s Faust, two classics of World literature seem worlds apart. One is a medieval work with deep religious connotations and an obsolete poetics, while the other is a modern epic that deals with the predicament of the individual at the dawn of a new technological and capitalist era. Yet, these differences are essentially historical and do not affect the way in which both works communicate as poetic representations. At this level, in fact, they are very much comparable, as I will try to show. These two works have in common not only the fundamental theme of the “quest for knowledge”, but they also share what is necessarily and inevitably the representational mode of any great poetic work: the mode of allegory.

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Iuvenalis 4. szatírája az életmű egyik legtöbbet kritizált darabja. A szerkezeti problémák miatt egyes kutatók a mű eredeti egységességét is kétségbe vonják azt feltételezve, hogy két, egy későbbi kiadó által összefércelt töredékből áll. A struktúra megértésének kulcsa a két fő szerkezeti egység, s ezzel együtt a két központi karakter, Crispinus és Domitianus közötti kapcsolat feltárása. Az alábbi tanulmány a szerkezeti problémák mellett a mű epikus jellegzetességeivel, illetve az invektíva célpontjaival foglalkozik.

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Nonkonformisten

Griechen bei Archelaos in Makedonien

Acta Antiqua Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Author: Heinrich Kuch

Archelaus, King of Macedonia, proved to admire Greek culture by inviting some distinguished authors and artists to live at his Court. They were the Athenian tragedians Euripides and Agathon, the poet and musician Timotheus of Miletus, the epic poet Choerilus of Samos and the painter Zeuxis of Heraclea, and it is possible that Thucydides, the historian, belonged to them, too. The Greek guests who did not seem to comply with the established standards of the contemporaneous art and life excelled at creating new forms and ideas. Without being a coherent group they were highly inspiring individuals. Each of them succeeded in promoting the literary or artistic field. Due to the generosity of their Macedonian host the Greek emigrants, far away from the struggles of the Peloponnesian War, were able to enjoy a safe and apparently prolific stay — evident above all from the Euripidean Iphigeneia in Aulis and the Bacchae.

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All three descriptions of dawn in Statius’ Achilleid (1. 242–5; 1. 819–20; 2. 1–4) are tightly connected to the “metamorphoses” of Achilles in the poem. These passages also recall the dawn opening Iliad 19, and the Homeric system of metaphors and symbols comparing the hero’s return to battle to the arrival of light and dawn. A particularly complex connection between Achilles’ exposure and the sunrise is established in the third Statian passage under discussion, which can also be interpreted as a possible prediction of Achilles’ future as an epic and elegiac hero. The genitor coruscae lucis mentioned in this passage can be identified as Iuppiter/Diespiter; as a consequence, the description sheds some light on the god’s role in the Achilleid as well.

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The article investigates the uses of the motif of the Warrior Women in János Arany’s epic poetry. The author of the article claims that the motif of the Warrior Women in Arany’s poetical discourse stemmed from the romantic literary tradition of the 1820–1830s. Furthermore, she argues that an old Scottish ballad, purportedly known by János Arany, provided the pattern that had been imitated by the Hungarian poet. Hence, the romantic image of the Hungarian Warrior Woman has become a highly symbolic and propagandistic content in Arany’s poetry during the 1850s. It reveals a genuine nineteenth-century endeavour of the nation-building process in order to promote the nation’s ready-to-fight patriotic women as models to be followed.

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The paper aims at summarising the progress that has been made after World War II in collecting, editing, translating, and analysing the Buddhist contributions to classical Sanskrit literature. It demonstrates that the systematic search for manuscripts has brought to light many unknown works, among them veritable highlights of their respective genres, such as the play Lokānanda by Candragomin, the Jātakamālās by Saṅghasena, Haribhaṭṭa, and Gopadatta, a great number of outstanding hymns by Mātṛceṭa and his successors, and verse epics such as the Kapphiṇābhyudaya by Śivasvāmin, and the two late poems by Sarvarakṣita, namely the Mahāsaṃvartanīkathā and the Maṇicūḍajātaka. It is noteworthy that in many cases the oldest or even only specimens of various genres were composed by Buddhist authors.

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Ovid’s representation of Orpheus is strictly related to Virgil’s texts. A wide range of studies have proved so far that the 10 th book of Metamorphoses follows the Georgics as far as narrative structure and use of vocabulary are concerned. Nevertheless it has been omitted, that Ovid’s work contains a number of patterns derived not from the Georgics but the Eclogues . Important textual parallelisms — such as Orpheus as being the representative of the elegy in contrast to epic, recusatio, the descent into the nether world, the motif of mourning nature, Hyacinthus, Adonis et Eurydice, the problem of a poet’s immortality, the mourning nature — attest that both Virgil’s and Ovid’s view of Orpheus is rooted in Epitaphios Bionos consequently this work is one of the most significant literary sources of both texts.

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