Search Results

You are looking at 51 - 60 of 525 items for :

  • "manuscripts" x
  • Arts and Humanities x
  • All content x
Clear All

On the original binding of the Dante Manuscript (Cod. Ital. 1) kept in the University Library. An unpublished note by Imre Henszlmann. The Dante Manuscript, which currently is to be found in the possession of the Library of the Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest with the label Cod. Ital. 1. (La Divina Commedia) has been brought there in 1877, when Sultan II. Abdulhamid sent back 35 ancient manuscripts to Hungary. All of them were in uniformly bound in leather, in the style of the Turkish trend of the era. These codexes have been studied in 1862 by Ipolyi Arnold and Henszlmann Imre in Istambul, in their original binding. We know many of them from the notes – taken in situ and published only in 2006 – of Ipolyi, but the original leather binding of the Dante-codex is known to us only from the sketch of Henszlmann published here for the first time.

Restricted access

2005 . 6. Cleminson 1988 – Ralph Cleminson: A Union Catalogue of Cyrillic Manuscripts in British and Irish Collections. London 1988 . 7. Crimi

Restricted access

The Budapest National Széchényi Library keeps a Pauline manuscript compiled in 1644. Based on a possessor’s entry at its very beginning, the source Cod. Lat. 794 has so far been referred to in the literature as the Pauline Processional of Újhely but its content has never been thoroughly investigated. The original aim of this study was to fill this gap by carrying out a codicological, liturgical and musical survey and, finally, producing a full description and detailed evaluation of the manuscript. However, the many-sided analysis has eventually led to unexpected findings, which make the earlier consensus about the provenance of the book questionable. First of all, while the manuscript uses the typical Pauline notation, its style and ductus differ markedly from the notation of the 1623 Gradual belonging definitely to the monastery of (Sátoralja)újhely, whereas it shows striking similarities to 17th–18th-century manuscripts of the Croatian Paulines. Other characteristics such as the sequence and designation of the stations in the processional topography and the last unit of the book, which is a notated Passional in Croatian language, point toward Lepoglava, the centre of the Pauline province as the possible provenance. A comparative analysis of the melodies also support this hypothesis.

Restricted access

Une oeuvre inconnue de Robert Boyvin à Budapest

Et les cycles vétéro-testamentaires dans les livres d'heures de Roue

Acta Historiae Artium Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Author: Ágnes Tóvizi

Summary

The Book of Hours Cod. Lat. 227 of the Széchényi National Library in Budapest was illuminated in Rouen at the end of the 15th century with a series of scenes from the Ancient Testament. It can be compared both in style and in iconography with the ms. W. 224 in the Baltimore Walters Art Museum, the ms. 5 in the Cherbourg Bibliothèque municipale and the ms. H. 1 of the Pierpont Morgan Library. In the manuscripts of Baltimore and Cherbourg the most of the typological connections were borrowed from the Speculum humanae salvationis and the compositions go back to the Lyon edition of 1478. The typological connections and the compositions in the Budapest manuscript follow an edition of the Biblia pauperum blockbook. The Cherbourg manuscript was illuminated in the workshop of the Master of the Échevinage de Rouen, the other three Books of Hours were painted by Robert Boyvin, a miniaturist working one generation later. The miniatures of the manuscript in Budapest presumably preserve some lost compositions of the Master of the Échevinage de Rouen.

Restricted access

Klára Garas was called upon in 1993 to write about the paintings by or attributed to Giorgione preserved in America. The manuscript was completed, but it has been never published. The author passed the article to the Acta Historiae Artium shortly before her death (26 June 2017), and it is published now only with small technical amendments.

Restricted access

Rusinowski and to his soldiers (sometimes called Lisowski’s Cossacks, too). It was probably Dembołęcki who was responsible for the publication of this booklet in 1621. Its text is a rhymed Polish paraphrase of a Prague Latin manuscript written in prose

Restricted access

nearly half a century its indispensable protagonist and at the end of the nineteenth century also its director, a post that he held for two decades. Two equally valuable sources date from 1902, the manuscript of Peter von Radics, 3 and the history

Restricted access

Manuscripts and printed editions of Hungarian provenance contain 288 sequences, out of which 237 have their own music. Particular dioceses and ecclesiastical institutions could decide freely which item they would sing on a given feast. The Ascension sequence Sursum sonet laudis melos, besides being present in the Futaki Gradual, is found only in three manuscripts of Zagreb provenance and in the missal of that diocese printed in 1511. The item is a shortened version in seven verses of a longer, eleven-verse original, written before 1305 by an unknown author and occurring very rarely in sources outside Hungary. In its present shortened form, it is only preserved in the liturgical books of the Hungarian use. The surviving sources show that this variant of the text is the result of a deliberate recrafting that occurred in Zagreb in the first part of the 14th century.

Restricted access

Huntington Library Manuscript Fields 5096, a manuscript of Carthusian miscellanea from the 1480s, contains a didactic plainchant treatise: Liber alphabeti super cantu plano. It is a rare example of a practical treatise, an anonymous product of the Carthusian charterhouse at Val di Pesio in Piedmont. The original source may have been the notes of a scholar, someone who was competent and well traveled like Anthony de Aviliana. The study of plainchant and singing in the Carthusian community was relegated to a novice's study time, to be learned in solitude with the help of texts such as Liber alphabeti. The subjects discussed in it are those we would expect for a pedagogical work on plainchant. This work presents technical information in a way which promotes the well-being of its surrounding monastic community.

Restricted access

The term coniuncta appears in some Gregorian, and occurs sporadically in theoretical sources in the second half of the 14th century, and on a wider scale during the 15th century. Related texts are to be found in Polish collections. This group contains a number of anonymous texts preserved in manuscripts held in the Biblioteka Jagiellońska in Kraków, and the University Library and Ossoliński Library in Wrocław. These manuscripts are examined. The treatises provide detailed information concerning the notational and performance practice connected to the coniuncta in cantus planus that they sometimes seem to be situated further towards the “practice” side than the “proper” musical records presented in graduals and antiphonals. All the instructions and guidelines relating to the transposition of melody, or the introduction of mutation and the use of appropriate intonation, are particularly worthy of scrutiny. They provide the evidence that the modification of the pitch system was closely related to a careful revision of the chant repertory.

Restricted access