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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: B.L. Béres, N.Z. Lupwayi, F.J. Larney, B. Ellert, E.G. Smith, T.K. Turkington, D. Pageau, K. Semagn, and Z. Wang

Research indicates that not all crops respond similarly to cropping diversity and the response of triticale (× Triticosecale ssp.) has not been documented. We investigated the effects of rotational diversity on cereals in cropping sequences with canola (Brassica napus L.), field pea (Pisum sativum L.), or an intercrop (triticale:field pea). Six crop rotations were established consisting of two, 2-yr low diversity rotations (LDR) (continuous triticale (T-T_LDR) and triticale-wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) (T-W_LDR)); three, 2-yr moderate diversity rotations (MDR) (triticale-field pea (T-P_MDR), triticale-canola (T-C_MDR), and a triticale: field pea intercrop (T- in P_MDR)); and one, 3-yr high diversity rotation (HDR) (canola-triticale-field pea (C-T-P_HDR)). The study was established in Lethbridge, Alberta (irrigated and rainfed); Swift Current (rainfed) and Canora (rainfed), Saskatchewan, Canada; and carried out from 2008 to 2014. Triticale grain yield for the 3-yr HDR was superior over the LDR rotations and the MDR triticale-field pea system; however, results were similar for triticale-canola, and removal of canola from the system caused a yield drag in triticale. Triticale biomass was superior for the 3-yr HDR. Moreover, along with improved triticale grain yield, the 3-yr HDR provided greater yield stability across environments. High rotational diversity (C-T-P_HDR) resulted in the highest soil microbial community and soil carbon concentration, whereas continuous triticale provided the lowest. Net economic returns were also superior for C-T-P_HDR ($670 ha–1) and the lowest for T-W_LDR ($458 ha–1). Overall, triticale responded positively to increased rotational diversity and displayed greater stability with the inclusion of field pea, leading to improved profitability and sustainability of the system.

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The objective of current study was to look at the variable expression of antioxidant enzymes in wheat genotypes exposed to various water stress regimes. Further the malondialdehyde (MDA) content were measured as an indicative of membrane integrity. Tolerance indices were calculated which reinforce in distinguishing tolerant and susceptible genotypes. The experimental material consisted of thirteen genotypes obtained from different sources. Stress was imposed by withholding irrigation at three different growth stages of plant, i.e. tillering, anthesis and grain filling. Four resistance indices include stress susceptibility index (SSI), yield stability index (YSI), mean productivity (MP) and tolerance index (TOL) was calculated on the basis of grain yield. Water stress treatments had no significant effect on CAT activity. CIM-47, CIM-49 and NR-234 showed minimum MDA content with increased POX activity under three different irrigation conditions and are therefore considered as tolerant genotypes. Higher levels of MDA with decline activity of POX was found in CIM-51, DD-4 and NR-230 led to suggest them as susceptible genotypes. The variable response of genotypes in tolerance could be related to differences in antioxidant enzyme levels. Significant positive correlation was found between SSI and TOL values whereas negative and significant association was noted between SSI and YSI. Significant and negative correlation was observed between YSI and TOL values. These traits are recognized as beneficial water stress tolerance indicators for selecting a stress tolerant variety. The most outstanding tolerance capacity in terms of susceptibility indices was detected in CIM-47 and CIM-50 under all water stresses. They indicated lowest SSI, TOL and MP with high YSI values. It may, therefore, be concluded that these genotypes have the potential of stress tolerance.

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–59. Berzsenyi, Z., Győrffy, B. (1995): Különböző növénytermesztési tényezők hatása a kukorica termésére és termésstabilitására. (Effect of various crop production factors on the yield and yield stability of maize.) Növénytermelés , 44 , 507

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crop production factors on the yield and yield stability of maize ( Zea mays L.) hybrids. Acta Agronomica Hungarica vol 54 no 4 313–424 pp. Dang Q.L. Effect of crop production

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588 Pepó, Péter — Győri, Z. (2005): A Study of the Yield Stability of Winter Wheat Varieties — Cereal Research Communications. 33.(4). 769 Győri Z

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Calderini, D.F., Slafer, G.A. 1998. Changes in yield and yield stability in wheat during the 20th century. Field Crops Res. 57 :335–347. Slafer G

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García del Moral, L., García del Moral, M., Molina-Cano, J., Slafer, G. (2003). Yield stability and development in two-and six-rowed winter barleys under Mediterranean conditions. Field Crops Res. 81, 109

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talajjavításához és tápanyagellátásához — Növénytermelés Vol 55 Nos 3–4 Pepó, Péter, Győri, Z.: 2005. A Study of the Yield Stability of Winter Wheat Varieties — Cereal Research Communications, Vol. 33 No. 4 pp. 769

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2069 2082 Boelcke, B., Léon, J., Schulz, R. R., Schröder, G., Diepenbrock, W. (1991): Yield stability of winter oil-seed rape ( Brassica napus L.) as affected by stand

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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: D. Latković, G. Jaćimović, M. Malešević, B. Marinković, J. Crnobarac, and V. Sikora

. 2000. Effect of crop rotation and fertilization on maize and wheat yields and yield stability in long-term experiment. European J. of Agron. 13 :225–244. Lap D. Effect of crop

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