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The subject of the paper is a folk prayer, a German popular text, which was collected by Zsuzsanna Erdélyi from a Swabian woman in Hungary. The prayer is a modern textual version of late medieval ars moriendi. It can be regarded as a folk prayer as it was in use among the common people, but its authorship cannot be linked to the common people. The author might have been a person from the lower clergy, with profound knowledge of theology and the Bible. This religious text satisfied a spiritual need among the people, as it was read out by the bed of the dying person, thus assisting the soul in reaching heaven. If the dying person recited it, or if it was read out to him, the prayer promised delivery from sin and automatic salvation without clerical mediation. No wonder such prayers were disapproved of and even banned by the Church.

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In the late 1930s several “peasant ecclesiola” formed around two Calvinist peasant prophetesses in Sub-Carpathia, a region that came under fi rst Czechoslovak, then successively Hungarian, Ukrainian and Soviet rule as a consequence of the Trianon peace dictate. One group functioned between 1937–1977 under the leadership of Mariska Borku (Tiszaágtelek, 1910–1978). Over a period of 40 years Mariska Borku wrote the “Words”, under the inspiration of Jesus Christ or the Holy Spirit. Her manuscript called the Lettszövetség (Third Testament) was regarded by the prophetess and her followers as sacred and seen as a continuation of the Bible. They disseminated it in handwritten copies and used it in religious services held in homes and for private devotions.The other prophetess, Borbála Szanyi Mikó (Nagydobrony, 1897–1950) organised a smaller, closed prayer group around herself, composed mainly of relatives. She too wrote down the “Words” she received in visions, in her Örökkévaló Evangélium (Eternal Gospel).

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Языческое прошлое глазами христианских хронистов-летописцев

К вопросу о начальном этапе среднеевропейской историографии

Studia Slavica
Author: Марта Фонт

The first chronicles of Central Europe were written in the beginning of 12th century. The authors of these chronicles lived in the courts of the princes or kings, and wrote their chronicle to support the idea of princely or royal courts about their own legitimacy. They used also the dynastic myths and some elements from the general tradition of the community about the past (oral history). They wrote differently about the origins, but there were common in the adaptation of the stories from the Bibles. The article focuses on the question how the Christian chroniclers wrote the pagan past; how the negative attitude to the pagan habits was mixed with the glorious events of the community in the pagan past.

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-11 August, 4281, p. 21. VERKHOVSKY, Aleksandr 1999: The Church and the national radicals. In: Russkaja Mysl', 5-11 August, 4281, p. 20-21. BADALANOVA, Florentina 1999: The Bulgarian Folk Bible. In: Zhivaja starina , 2, pp

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Abstract

The Psalter (Wolfenbüttel, Herzog August Bibliothek, Cod. Guelf. 39 Aug. 4º) of Beatrice of Aragon, the wife of King Matthias Corvinus, often features in research literature on account of its title-page and ornate binding. The title-page (fol. 13r) was long attributed to Francesco del Cherico, but for some time now it has been ascribed to Francesco Rosselli and his collaborator, the Maestro dell'Iliade Medicea, while the binding is attributed – after Anthony Hobson – to Felice Feliciano. There are written documents to prove that both Francesco Rosselli and Felice Feliciano visited Hungary, both in the late 1470s, in1480 the latest. That Rosselli painted the Psalter title-page in Buda cannot be proven, although the arguments proposed by Edina Zsupán – the Hungarian saints in the calendar, the crudeness of the parchment – may suggest it. However, not only the title-page but six other pages of the Psalm-book are illumined (foll. 43r, 59v, 76v, 94r, 115v, 135v, 155v). These pages so far ignored by research literature are not Francesco Rosselli's works, being in completely different style. Their illuminator was presumably one of the North Italian masters who illumined for Hungarian clients several manuscripts in Buda around1480 and later, among whom only one is known by name(Franciscus Kastello Ithallico de Mediolano). He used cold, bright colours, the faces of the figures are markedly modelled, the drapery has a metallic hardness. One of the ruling motifs of the marginal decoration is the cornucopia. This hand cannot be identified at present in any manuscript whose provenience was Buda; its closest relative is a single Italian illumination in the Corvinus Gradual(National Széchényi Library, Cod. Lat. 424, fol. 7r). The master of the ornate binding of the Psalter – as Marianne Rozsondai has established – was the binder of the 14th century Bible kept in Erlangen (Universitätsbibliothek, Ms. 6) which also features of portrait of King Matthias. Important roles are played on both bindings by the leather filigree arabesques and the embossed all'antica motifs. The hand of the master making the gilded Corvina bindings can also be discerned on the Bible binding. So it seems that these two luxurious manuscripts completed around 1480 had an important – maybe even model-giving – role in the history of the evolving royal library, the Bibliotheca Corvina.

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Wickler, W. K. & Van Der Merwe, C. H. J. 1993. Training Tomorrow's Bible Translators: Some Theoretical Pointers. Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages. Vol. 19. No. 19. 41

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Baking bells (or baking lids) were actually very simple ovens that were suitable for baking bread, meat and fish. This method of food preparation was practiced since prehistory in the Mediterranean world and we can find descriptions of baking bells in the Bible and in the works of the writers of antiquity. This individual mode of baking bread became especially widespread during late antiquity. In some regions, the use of baking bells survived either owing to a general stagnation (as in the Balkans or the Alpine lands), or to unusual living conditions (as in the Roman military camps of the Augustan period and in the medieval Ottoman-period border forts in Hungary). Their increasingly frequent use in late antiquity was a reflection of economic decline and the disappearance of urban bakeries. At the same time, the adoption of baking bells by the Barbarian peoples (such as the Avars and the ancient Hungarians) settling on the fringes of the Mediterranean world can be seen as a cultural advance and the adoption of local traditions. Baking bells were still used in the Carpathian Basin as late as the 19th century and they can be found in some areas of the Balkans even today.

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On the basis of Croato-Glagolitic documents found in Hungary and parts of Ivan Bercic's fragments, the paper intends to describe the effect Latin texts had on Old Church Slavonic texts in Croatian edition translated from Latin. This impact can be characterized as 1) external (on the outward appearance of the codex sheet, especially on the shape of letters) or 2) linguistic (on the vocabulary, grammar, and style). In terms of the way this influence is exerted, one can distinguish between 1) direct (individual) influence (the impact of a certain passage on the corresponding part of the translated text) or 2) indirect (cumulative) influence (a joint effect of identical phenomena-occurring in various Latin texts-on several Croato-Glagolitic passages, independently of the given passage). Direct influence is exemplified by identical initials, most cases of poetic usage of synonyms, in grammar by participium instans, and negative direct influence is apparent when a passage of the Bible is translated incorrectly. Cumulative influence is present in most initials taken from Latin, in poetic usage of synonyms beyond the given Latin text, and in the recurring use of Latin liturgical terms and their calques in the rubrics. The impact of the Latin original has a mainly positive and enriching character. At the same time, harmful effects are quite rare.

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This article is an attempt to compare the dramas by Slovakian and Hungarian dramatists. As an introduction a very brief issue throws light upon the Slovakian and Hungarian literary relations, which were the course of coexistence of two nations in the united state field. The outstanding Slovakian poet of the last quarter of the 19th century Pavol Ország-Hviezdoslav admired Hungarian culture and literature. In 1905 he translated into Slovakian “The Tragedy of Man” by Imre Madách and a few years later he wrote his own philosophical drama “Herodes and Herodias”, what made possible to follow some parallels between these works. At first sight there isn't much in common, however what makes them similar are some philosophical subjects such as the Bible motives, interest in history and human moral problems. At the same time the article deals with genre of these works (dramatical poem, philosophical drama, symbolical poem). The analysis of two dramas makes reasonable to confirm that between them there are typological and contact relations which are the part of the general Slovakian and Hungarian cultural context.

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The present paper outlines a historical change in Hungarian syntax by focusing on participial constructions and their clausal equivalents in ten different Hungarian translations of the Bible. The first part investigates the relative frequency of the relevant structures and, relying upon statistical data, it characterises the process of a shift from analytic to synthetic constructions. Then we analyse secondary semantic differences among the various structures (participial constructions, subordinate clauses and coordinate clauses) and propose that in the case of subordination the semantic relationship between the matrix sentence and the dependent clause is expressed in an explicit manner. However, if the meaning of the related participial construction is complex (combining features of temporal, causal, and instrumental relationships), a subordinate clause can express only one of these, and the other features are not represented in it. Coordination, on the other hand, especially asyndetic (conjunctionless) coordination and that involving the conjunctions és, s ‘and’, is more capable of embracing several shades of meaning. Thus, in terms of their semantic properties, coordinate clauses are more similar to participial constructions than subordinate clauses are. Finally, the paper raises some general ideas with respect to the theoretical background of this kind of shift in sentence construction. The framework of the study is what is called “traditional grammar”, but it also introduces some terms of functional grammar.

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