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homes or working voluntarily to support immigrants, and on threats against those hosting refugees. Onsite visits started with 25 days of classroom observations in each school during a term of a 9th grade class (students ranging from 14–16 years

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nobility, coupled with the mere electoral legitimacy of the king, weakened the monarchy‘s political position. The appointment of foreign kings to the Polish throne drew Poland into successive wars or made the electoral monarchs more interested in their home

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reduce the risk of child poverty (with further references). For an optimistic view on the question, stating that it is possible to improve low fertility rates through public policies: Home (2008) 249–60, with further references. For the sake of testing

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.11.02 Doniger, W. (2009): The Hindus. An alternative history. Oxford University Press, Oxford. Eurostat Home. http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/portal/page/portal/eurostat/home/ Letöltve: 2012

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2006 Zellweger, T. — Sieger, P. (2012): Coming home or breaking free? Career choice intentions of the next generation in family businesses . Ernst

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23 83 116 Dench, S., Hurtsfield, J., Hill, D and Akroyd, K. (2006): Employers’ Use of Migrant Labour. Summary Report . London: Home Office

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Publ., London. The House Book Altman, I., Werner, C. (eds) (1985): Home Environments: Human Behaviour and Environment. Vol. 8. Plenum

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The purpose of the study is double: on the one part, the presentation and popularization of a scarcely used method in domestic sociology, the contextual analysis, on the other, the presentation of the effects of the cultural and social capital on high-school students’ efficiency within an OTKA 2006–2008 research project. The regression models called attention to the importance of the contextual (institution-wide) effects on high-school students’ efficiency and performance. This study presents these effects by using Davis’s typology and separates the effects on individual and group levels. Among the factors that explain school success are sex, cultural capital brought from home and the students’ and their parents’ relationship resources (in the case of the last one we accentuate those relationships which are determined by the students’ and their parents’ religiousness). We came to the results that while boys’ school (class) percentage does not have any contextual effect, the percentage of parents with degree per school/class already has an effect on the students’ school efficiency, and concerning social capital we also have interesting results.

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Natural law theory can render the so-called “non-aggression principle” (NAP), which prohibits the initiation of force against person or property, intelligible and can ground a robust, even if not exceptionless, version of the principle. Natural law and natural rights theories share common roots, but are often seen as divergent, if not antagonistic. But I believe it can plausibly be maintained that claims about natural rights find their home within the context of more comprehensive natural law theories. I seek to illustrate this claim by showing how a central claim about natural rights can be defended using the resources provided by the best contemporary version of natural law theory. I consider the significance of the NAP and its place in natural rights theory. I outline the contours of one contemporary natural law position, the new classical natural law (NCNL) theory. I go on to indicate what form I suspect a version of the NAP framed using the categories provided by the NCNL theory might take.

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section 27(4) of the Trademark Act, as amended in 2005, provides enforcement against intermediaries whose services are used by a third party (that is usually the infringer itself) for the infringement. In the HYUNDAI case the registrars of the domain names, trusted by the resellers of cars having formerly been members of the HYUNDAI commercial chain in Hungary, were sued together with the resellers for the reason that they did not cancel the registration of the domain names after the commercial chain had been ceased. The Hungarian courts of first and second instance built their judgements on the ECJ’s BMW judgement (C-63/97). Emphasis is given also on a case relating to infringement by an operator of an Internet home page, as the latter was condemned by the Hungarian Court of first instance for not complying with the Act on Electronic Commerce. Nevertheless, the court of second instance condemned him not therefore but for the tort in respect of the provisions of the Civil Code, e.g. for injury of reputation. Finally, the article is closed by an outlook on ideas on the development of EC law relating to liability of intermediaries.

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