Search Results

You are looking at 61 - 70 of 130 items for :

  • All content x
Clear All

Abstract

Faué's mélodies have received too little attention. Here four early songs are subjected to musico-poetic and stylistic-technical analysis. To understand fully the young musician's achievement, the songs are viewed in their socio-cultural milieu. His earliest works date from the end of the Second Empire and the Franco-Prussian War; his first maturity coincided with the beginnings of la Belle Époque. Of modest origins, Fauré succeeded in earning the patronage of leading social and artistic figures of the time, including the venerable Franz Liszt, and the celebrated singer, composer and mistress of her own salon, Pauline Viardot. One mélodie each by these established composers is analyzed in comparison with the two musico-poetically similar pieces by the young Frenchman. These juxtapositions show clearly that Fauré followed his own path from the outset, in a direction that was altogether forward-oriented, even where it was built of stones borrowed from the past.

Restricted access

Foreign travellers provided important documentations about Hungary. In the 16th and 17th centuries, the image of the heroic Christian country fighting the pagan Turks took shape. This image was strengthened through the Hussars who distinguished themselves in the battles of Maria Theresia and played an important role in the war of independence in 1848–1849. The Great Hungarian Plain, a sandy steppe, appeared to the travellers as an exotic place with its sand dunes, sand storms, fata morgana, and its inhabitants: shepherds, hussars, and bandits. In the 19th century, Hungary became a beloved topic of the Western European exotic literature. Through his poetry Nikolaus Lenau brought a high contribution to the image of the exotic Hungary. Born in Hungary and a good violinist, Lenau drew a vivid image of the Gipsy musicians and their music. His poem Die drei Zigeuner (The Three Gipsies) was inspired by a painting of Ferenc Pongrácz, and did inspire another painter, Alois Schönn. Liszt purchased the copy of Schönn’s painting and composed a song on Lenau’s poem. His music proves a deep identification with Lenau’s ideas, with the romantic and yet realistic image of the Gipsies, the representatives of the Hungarian music.

Restricted access

This study examines a piece of smith's work preserved in the permanent exhibition of the Budapest Liszt Memorial Museum, which portrays scenes from the Paradise of Dante's Divina Commedia. Formerly owned by Liszt, this object is a galvanoplastic replica of a sketched drawing by Peter Cornelius for his Dante ceiling in the Villa Massima in Rome. Even so, the work preserved in the Liszt Museum is nowhere mentioned in the literature on Cornelius. The name of the donor (cardinal Hohenlohe) and the year of its donation (1867) are already known to us. These circumstances allow us to conclude that its presentation as a gift may have been in connection with the successful performances of Liszt's Dante Symphony in Rome. The work was performed at the inauguration of the Dante Galeria (February 26th 1866). The patron of the exhibition was Johannes, the King of Saxony, in whose possession the drawing was at the time. The opening ceremony provided the occasion for Hohenlohe to come into contact with the ruler of Saxony, and request a loan of the drawing in order to make the galvanoplastic replica.

Restricted access

Liszt fut un génie de son temps autant qu’un génie de la musique. Restant inclassable, malgré son tempérament romantique, il inventa le format du récital qui lui permettait de se donner en spectacle, seul et à travers toute l’Europe, sans reposer le bon vouloir d’un mécène. Sa recherche eff rénée de liberté coïncide, en outre, avec l’esprit qui soufflait alors sur la Hongrie, qui allait culminer avec la révolution de 1848. C’est ainsi que la liberté lisztienne trouve son enracinement dans un territoire, une patrie, qui restèrent par ailleurs chez lui largement fantasmés.

Restricted access

Aus den größtenteils unveröffentlichten Briefen Franz Liszts entfaltet sich eine sympathische Frauengestalt. Die aus einer angesehenen weimarer Theaterfamilie stammende Mezzosopranistin Emilie Genast, eine hochmusikalische Lied- und Oratoriumsängerin, um 22 Jahre jünger als er, wurde ihm zur idealen Muse, indem sie die Lisztschen Lieder und Psalmen, die Titelrolle der Legende von der Heiligen Elisabeth beseelt und erfolgreich vortrug. Die Musikgeschichte hat ihr auch das Entstehen neuer Lisztscher Gesänge zu verdanken. Intim gestaltete sich das persönliche Verhältnis der beiden in der vielleicht schwersten Zeit des Vielgeprobten: nachdem die Fürstin Wittgenstein im Mai 1860 nach Rom gereist war. Der Künstler, nahe fünfzig, wusste nicht, wann und wohin er zu reisen hatte, wie er seine Laufbahn fortsetzen würde, einzig, dass seines Bleibens in Weimar nicht war — bis er endlich im Herbst 1861 nach Rom kam. 1863 heiratete Emilie Dr. Merian in Basel. Von dieser Zeit an vertiefte und veredelte sich ihre Sympathie zu einer gegenseitigen, respektvollen, bis an des Meisters Lebensende dauernden Künstlerfreundschaft.

Restricted access

Aus den größtenteils unveröffentlichten Briefen Franz Liszts entfaltet sich eine sympathische Frauengestalt. Die aus einer angesehenen Weimarer Theaterfamilie stammende Mezzosopranistin Emilie Genast, eine hochmusikalische Lied- und Oratoriumsängerin, um 22 Jahre jünger als er, wurde ihm zur idealen Muse, indem sie die Lisztschen Lieder und Psalmen, die Titelrolle der Legende von der Heiligen Elisabeth beseelt und erfolgreich vortrug. Die Musikgeschichte hat ihr auch das Entstehen neuer Lisztscher Gesänge zu verdanken. Intim gestaltete sich das persönliche Verhältnis der beiden in der vielleicht schwersten Zeit des Vielgeprobten: nachdem die Fürstin Wittgenstein im Mai 1860 nach Rom gereist war. Der Künstler, nahe fünfzig, wußte nicht, wann und wohin er zu reisen hatte, wie er seine Laufbahn fortsetzen würde, einzig, das seines Bleibens in Weimar nicht war — bis er endlich im Herbst 1861 nach Rom kam. 1863 heiratete Emilie Dr. Merian in Basel. Von dieser Zeit an vertiefte und veredelte sich ihre Sympathie zu einer gegenseitigen, respektvollen, bis an des Meisters Lebensende dauernden Künstlerfreundschaft.

Restricted access

Franz Liszt und seine Beziehungen zu Regensburg

Ein Beitrag zur Vorgeschichte der Regensburger Kirchenmusikschule und der Budapester Musikakademie

Studia Musicologica Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Author: Jürgen Libbert
Restricted access

Franz Liszt: Un saltimbanque en province

Éd. par Nicolas Dufetel et Malou Haine. (Lyon: Symétrie, 2007), p. 224

Studia Musicologica
Author: Klára Hamburger
Restricted access