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Summary  

This report presents the results of the determination of radionuclide component of the scales on the inner surfaces of oil well pipes and pump-compressors for certain oilfields in Kazakhstan. Results of 96 investigations show that the main contamination of pipe surface scales with radionuclides was related to the accumulation of 226Ra, 228Ra and their daughter decay products. Study of the scales removed by means of a special solution of “COX ASIA-CLEAN' revealed that practically all radionuclides were removed from the inner surface of the pipes. Scales, after segregation from the solution, contained the radionuclides in strongly bound conditions. Loss of radon isotopes comprised at most 3& to 5& of the radioactivity within the scales. These results suggest that an economically effective method for burial of radioactive scales is possible. Methods of cleaning and burial were tested at one of the oilfields in Kazakhstan.

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Abstract  

Determination of retardation factors and coefficients of distribution using a simplified mathematical model for analyzing the migration of leachate and radioactive material contained in radioactive waste burial concrete trench systems has been developed. Results show that concrete for engineered trench systems secures radionuclide preservation in solidified medium for longer than 300 years. These results will be used for constructing future radioactive waste storing centers in Yugoslavia.

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This paper deals the Iron Age metalworks found in South Transdanubia, southern part of the Great Plain and in the Srem area. The objects are known from hoards (Szárazd-Regöly, Čurog, Hrtkovci, Židovar), inhumation and cremation burials. The gold and silver jewellery (masked gold beads, wheel shaped gold amulets, crescent decorated gold beads, silver ornaments, crossbow silver fibulae), bronze astragalos belts, bronze rings, amber beads show the influence of Illyrian-Thracian workshops in the Northern Balkan. The objects can be dated to 4th–3rd centuries B.C.

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Whodunnit? — Disturbed graves in early medieval cemeteries . Graves disturbed in antiquity are a common feature in any period in which inhumation burial was practised. Disturbances of early medieval graves are often interpreted as human interference. Excavations at the Langobardic-period cemetery at Szólád (Kom. Somogy) in 2005–2007, however, indicated that the role of burrowing animals should not be underestimated. Excellent soil conditions demonstrated that at least 10% of the graves were disturbed by burrowing animals whose activities displaced bones and grave-goods. In this particular case, badgers, who are known to inhabit warrens for several generations and for extending them to a depth of 5 metres, are the most likely suspects.

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Abstract  

The 18 km long banks of the Bohunice NPP waste water recipient are contaminated by137Cs as a result of two accidents on the CO2 cooled NPP-A1 unit in 1976 and 1977. Contamination acceptance limits 6 or 8 Bq137Cs/g of soil, depending on contaminated area size, were derived on the basis of developed principles, and approved by the authorities. Removing and safe burial of 1100 m3 of contaminated soil from steep area and 15 cm thick clean soil covering on about 1 ha of flat area of the contaminated banks is planned in frame of the re-considered restoration project implementation in 1995/96.

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Abstract

In the course of the archaeological investigation the burial chapel of the Angevin dinasty in Székesfehérvár, on the south side of the Provostry church could be identified. The chapel dedicated to St. Catherine was founded about 1370. The red marble tombs of King Louis the Great and of his daughter Catherine were localized on the basis of their fragments. The marble fragments have contributed also to the knowledge of the monuments, and are treated here mainly from the point of view of the costume as well as of their place in the history of 14th century sculpture.

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Religious Conflicts and Cultural Differences in the Jászkunság Region in the 18.-20. Centuries - The Habsburg court and Queen Maria Theresa began the forced settlement of Catholics into Hungary in the 18th century. The study examines the form these efforts at recatholicization took among the Jazygians (Jászok) and Cumanians (Kunok) living in the north-west of the Great Plain, the denominational conflicts they caused and the influence on human relations, everyday and festive customs. The study also deals with Catholic-Calvinist mixed marriages and the differences in way of life and customs (differences in festive days, weddings and burials between the denominations living within the same settlement).

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On the coins in the cemetery of the Hungarian commoners at Magyarhomorog-Kónyadomb . The Magyarhomorog-Kónyadomb cemetery, in which 540 graves of the Hungarian commoners were unearthed from the 10 th –12 th centuries, was the richest one in the Carpathian Basin in regard of coins: a hundred and ninety-nine coins were uncovered in 145 graves, mostly of adults, from the period between (Saint) Stephen I (1000–1038) and Stephen II (1116–1131). The majority of the coins were intact; two of them were folded in half. Coins cut to pieces were placed in 48 graves: the fragments either belonged to the same item or they were independent segments. They appeared in three functions in the burial rite: in clusters as perforated coin ornaments (3 graves of children), as burial obols in the mouth or the hands 69 graves and as diverse coin grave-goods 98 graves. The distribution of the graves with coins shows a relative chronology in concentric stripes, where the oldest ones are in the centre. The village that used the cemetery has not yet been identified.

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The authors discuss a group of objects having specific or cultic functions in the late neolithic Lengyel culture, which had formerly been referred to as “lamps”, “clay lamps” or “small clay altars”. These objects have been known from the entire occupation territory of the Lengyel community. However, recent excavations uncovered similar finds in a few graves of the Lengyel cemetery at Alsónyék-Bátaszék, which represent new types of the discussed group of objects. The Alsónyék cemetery with the unearthed 2400 burials of the Lengyel period and the settlement with 90 houses are the largest cemetery and settlement of the Eurasian area to date. The authors describe and publish these objects and the crouched inhumation burials that contained them. They also classify the finds and determine their typological and chronological place first of all within the Lengyel community. The possible antecedents are also reviewed in the Central and SE European Neolithic and Early Copper Age. Based on H. Schwarzberg’s study of the Anatolian and SE European finds, they suggest the name “Kulttischchen” for the finds of the Lengyel culture as well. According to the anthropological analyses, these objects were placed exclusively beside women at Alsónyék and also in the Mórágy late neolithic cemetery, which indicates the role that women played in the cultic life of the contemporary communities.

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Anders, A.–Nagy, E. Gy. 2007 Late Neolithic burial rites at the site of Polgár-Csőszhalom-dűlő. In: J. K. Kozłowski–P. Raczky (eds): The Lengyel, Polgár and related cultures in the Middle/Late Neolithic in Central Europe

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