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Abstract  

This article investigates the textual embedding of epigraphs in the first decades of the nineteenth century. While it had long been customary to use a Latin or Greek quote on title pages, many British and French Romantics went further, placing one or several mottoes at the beginning of each chapter or poem. From an intertextual perspective, these quotes are indexical traces of absent texts. The paratextual dialogue, this article’s main focus, rather involves equally present elements (motto and title, motto and chapter, motto and motto). As a form of commentary, epigraphs shed light on the text they accompany, thus operating in a convergent manner, but their divergent potential should not be underestimated: instead of helping us plod through the plot, mottoes can lead us astray, much like unreliable narrators. Taken as a whole, they form a parallel text, an alternative narrative, where writers sometimes allow themselves to develop a different, paradoxical, poetics. The above-mentioned issues are illustrated with examples from Stendhal, whose Red and Black, arguably the most playful and ironic example of “motto-mania” in French Romantic literature, is reread in light of Roland Barthes’ S/Z.

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L’imaginaire fantastique chez Nodier et l’inspiration biblique

Thématiques des images littéraires d’inspiration biblique reprises par Nodier

Neohelicon
Author: Graciela Boruszko

Résumé  

Cette article interroge sur l’utilisation des images bibliques au sein de l’œuvre de Charles Nodier, pionnier du conte fantastique en France. D’après une approche comparée les images bibliques originales sont confrontées avec les images transposées au sein du récit fantastique. L’analyse s’intéresse à la conjonction entre narration, emprunt des images bibliques et le résultat de cet emprunt dans une image modifiée qui fait référence à l’image original tout en participant dans un nouveau réseau de signification. L’intertextualité des emprunts témoigne d’une créativité littéraire qui s’exprime dans une nouvelle cosmogonie fantastique qui n’hésite pas à se servir d’un monde biblique afin de façonner une nouvelle interprétation du surnaturel.

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Frawley, W. 1985. Intertextuality and the Dictionary: Towards a Deconstructionist Account of Lexicography. Dictionaries Vol. 7. 1–20. Frawley W. Intertextuality and the Dictionary

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Abstract  

While memory guarantees a degree of continuity between past and present, it is not without shortcomings. Powerless in the face of the future and threatened by oblivion, memory has the ability to imprison individuals and communities alike in a version of the past that has been promoted to the level of historical truth. This is why the work of Lebanese-Canadian playwright Wajdi Mouawad (a rising figure in the world of French-language theatre) generally prefers the international kind of memory provided by literature to the historical ties commonly invoked in family retellings of the past. Mouawad’s reworking of memory is particularly present in his best-known play,Littoral (1997), which addresses the various ways in which institutionalized forms of memory prevent the development of individual identities. This article concentrates on his more recent playIncendies (2003), where historical memory no longer yields to literary memory, but rather superimposes itself on an intertextual canvas. While obviously rewriting the Oedipus myth as told by Sophocles (whoseOedipus Rex becomes a “palimpsestuous” plot forIncendies), Mouawad’s text is also replete with references to the civil war in his native Lebanon. Most historical episodes (e.g. the burnt-out bus of 1975, the Sabra and Chatila refugee camp massacres of 1982) are reworked in function of the dramatic plot, and it would be unfair to reduceIncendies to a “message” or any other traditional form of “commitment”. Yet Mouawad does not fit the profile of Jean-Paul Sartre’s “irresponsible” writer either: Lebanon’s civil war, far from being a mere screen onto which the action is projected, informs this play as much as the oedipal plot does. It is indeed the combination of both semantic networks that allows a real working through of memory, which is what is at stake here.

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Abstract  

A decisive paradigmatic change in the poetry of Lrinc Szab in 1927–1928 seems to be synchronous with a comparable alteration in world literature: a shift from classical modernity to hermetism, abstract objectivism, consciousness lyric and a new subjectivism, trends which anticipated present day styles and have survived in neoavant-gardist and poststructuralist poetics. By this move his poetic practice transcended the phase represented by Stefan George, Rainer Maria Rilke, or Mihly Babits and paralleled poetic events then unseen or unforeseen by Lrinc Szab. These included transmutations in the work of contemporary poets, Gottfried Benn, T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound or Attila Jzsef. The novelty was not thematic but modal: a new discourse, a change from the homogeneous to the dialogical conception of the poem. In Lrinc Szab's vision of personality the voice of the actorincludes the voice of the rebellious individualof traditional poetry (with a sociological view, a pragmatical-pedagogical motivation and a psychological quest for truth) counterpoised by the voice of the spectatorexhibiting the stable laws of the universe (passing a logical judgment). It was a radical novelty in his poetry that the distinction and distance of the ego and the world ceased to be a precondition of aesthetic formation and were replaced by the polyphonic utterance of a You and the World, which living in, and at the same time distanced from, the ego enter into a dialogue in their poetic quiddity. The idea of “one justice” informing world history gave way to a demand for the “one's justice.” Lrinc Szab's sense of contradiction between the ego and history was reinforced by his study of Der Einzige und sein Eigentum by Max Stirner. In the light of this work he reconsidered the ideas of religion, fatherland, freedom, love, justice, and liberalism and came to confront all of the bonds of the individual personality and collective action. The poetic adaptation of Stirner's ideas presents a peculiar case of intertextuality: it encourages the poem's train of thought, tunes its mode of discourse, integrates textually in the course and rhetoric of creation, and occasionally informs the poems in their entirety (as a rule those of the highest poetic rank).

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. Translators through History . Amsterdam/Philadelphia , Pen.: John Benjamins . 9. Fewell , D. N. (ed.) 1992 . Reading between Texts: Intertextuality and the Hebrew Bible . Louisville

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-existent Ideal Viewer 3 4 Lemke, J. L. 1985. Ideology, Intertextuality, and the Notion of Register. In: Benson, J. D. & Greaves, W. S. (eds.) Systemic

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. Neumann S. Sprichwörtliches aus Mecklenburg 1996 Norrick , Neal R. 1989: Intertextuality in Humor. Humor 2-2, 117–139. Norrick N. R

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-Taᵓlīf wal-Tarjama wal-Ṭibāᶜa wal-Nashr . Ishay , Haviva ( 2003 ): Hebrew Poetry in Light of Medieval Arabic Love Prose: Intertextuality as a Cultural and Textual Bridge . In

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Winick , Stephen D. 2003: Intertextuality and Innovation in a Definition of the Proverb Genre, in: Wolfgang Mieder (ed.), Cognition, Comprehension, and Communication: A Decade of North American Proverb Studies (1990–2000). Baltmannsweiler

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