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In 1971, the Faculty of Music at the University of Toronto purchased a medieval manuscript, a Dominican processional. The manuscript E-6 201 (Faculty of Music, Rare Book Room) is the only medieval processional found in Canada and this is the first study devoted too it. It was carefully modelled on the Dominican prototype laid out by Humbert of Romans in 1254. The notation also follows the Humbert codex. One detail does distinguish the Toronto processional from the Humbert prototype, the section devoted to the washing of the saint’ altars. The clue of this processional’s origin is the addition of Stephen of Hungary. The addition of Stephen strongly suggests a Hungarian origin for the Toronto processional.

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Aufrecht, Th. (1869): A Catalogue of Sanskrit Manuscripts of the Library of Trinity College, Cambridge . Cambridge. Choudhary, A. K. (1971): Early Medieval Village in North-eastern India. (A. D

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The “Cantus Index GUI” (Bezuidenhout) is a data-capture utility that facilitates the population of a database containing electronic indices for the Western plainchant manuscripts in the Grey Collection of the National Library of South Africa. It seeks to accelerate to capture of data describing plainchant sources, and to encourage standardization with a view to future consolidation and analyses of this data. The addition of the MIDINeume ActiveX Control (Brand) points the way to some of the expansion possibilities.

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Abstract

In this paper, the author presents a fragment of a translation of the Abidharmakośabhāṣya into Old Uighur preserved at the National Library of China, Beijing. This leaf can be connected to the Abidharmakośabhāṣya fragments preserved at the Ethnographic Museum in Stockholm and studied by Shōgaito Masahiro. Through an examination of the size, form, handwriting, etc., we conclude that all the Abidharmakośabhāṣya texts preserved in Stockholm, Kyoto, Beijing, Lanzhou, and Hangzhou belong to one and the same manuscript.

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The present paper describes the -p edi- past tense in Western Karaim — the first such attempt made in the available scholarly literature. It is important to note that the paper is based not only on philological data collected from manuscripts from the 18th–20th centuries, but also on field research conducted by the late Polish Turcologist, Józef Sulimowicz (1913–1973). His linguistic informants were Karaims from Halych.

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The Bāṇāsurakathā is a sharada manuscript in Old Kashmiri composed by Avtar Bhatt, dated between the 14th and 16th centuries. It retells the love story of the demon Bāṇa’s daughter Uṣā with Krishna’s grandson Aniruddha, and the ensuing fight between Bāṇa and Krishna, as it is found in the Harivaṃśapurāṇa. This paper focuses on the linguistic features of the Old Kashmiri language in which this manuscript is composed. Old Kashmiri belongs to the Early New Indo-Aryan language stage, a stage crucial for a number of syntactic developments which determined the Indo-Aryan languages of today. First, the language found in the Bāṇāsurakathā is situated among the attestations of Old Kashmiri found in other manuscripts. The language is younger than that of the Mahānaya-Prakāśa, but older than the language used in the Lallā-Vākyāni. Second, a number of linguistic features of Old Kashmiri are presented, such as the case marking and the verb agreement. Third, the paper focuses on the phenomenon of pronominal suffixation, well known in Modern Kashmiri, but not present in Apabhraṃśa. It is shown that the first traces of pronominal suffixation already existed in the Bāṇāsurakathā, but their use was not yet grammatically fixed.

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Some of the manuscripts and books of the Hungarian humanist, Johannes Sambucus (1531–1584) are still kept in Vienna, in the Austrian National Library. A source of information puts a new light on the sale and reception of his library. In his last will made in 1583, Sambucus left his library, the manuscripts he still owned and his maps to his son, in 1584, not long after his death, his widow started negotiations about selling them to the Emperor Rudolf II. However, the data clearly suggest that Sambucus’ library did not become en bloc part of the Imperial Library, if the purchase took place at all: only 44 years after Sambucus’ death was a certain part of his library bought by Sebastian Tengnagel for both the Imperial Library and himself. Another result of the research confirms that the philologist Sambucus cannot be separated from the book and manuscript collector Sambucus, and the examples presented here justify why it is worth involving in the research the extant books of the Hungarian humanist.

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201 208 Livne-Kafri, Ofer (2011b): Between Arabic and Coptic in a Bilingual Manuscript of the Pentateuch. In: Oetinger, A. - Bar-Maoz, D. (eds): Mituv Yosef, Yosef Tobi Jubilee

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ZDMG 1868 22 195 224 MS = manuscript Najafzāda Bārforush, Moḥammad-Bāgher (M

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ortodoxia története Magyarországon a XVIII. századig . Szeged, 1995. 77–83. Кочиш 1999–2001 = The Szeged Minea . A Cyrillic Manuscript from the Late 16th Century . A text edition by Mihály Kocsis. (Bibliotheca Slavica Savariensis

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