Search Results

You are looking at 61 - 70 of 248 items for :

  • "sustainable development" x
  • All content x
Clear All

): Technological progress and sustainable development: what about the rebound effect? Ecological Economics , 36(1): 119–132. Binswanger M. Technological progress and sustainable development

Restricted access

I. ( 2012 ), The Sustainable farming . Ecological Institute for Sustainable Development Foundation , Miskolc [6] Dudás K

Restricted access

) Transforming our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development . https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/content/documents/21252030%20Agenda%20for%20Sustainable%20Development%20web.pdf

Open access

554 Samarah N.H.: 2005. Effects of drought stress on growth and yield of barley — Agronomy for Sustainable Development vol. 25 no. 1 145–149 pp

Restricted access

Carley, M., Christine, I., 1997: Managing Sustainable development, Earthscan, London Christine I. Managing

Restricted access

17 87 112 Várallyay, Gy. 1997a: Sustainable development - a challenge for rational land use and soil management. In: Filep, G. (ed.), Land Use and

Restricted access

The paper analyses the role of building rehabilitations based on the three pillars of sustainability: environmental consciousness, economic sustainability and social responsibility; to verify that all these aspects of sustainable development are accentuated in the rehabilitation of historic buildings. Beyond these aspects the study emphasizes the particular criteria of social sustainability highlighting the significance of contemporary use and conversion of built heritage. In the issue of historical continuitylocal identity the tradition is displayed as a determinative element of the image of the local community. Related to the search for local identity the continuity of built heritage may be dominant for a population — especially in Central Europe where because of the specific political background the appearance of modernism equaled a cultural rupture. Exploring the question of urban continuityfitting it can be established that built heritage preserved by current usage enriches the city with connotational contents providing reference points in space and time for the local community. The third subtopic, the issue of functional continuityfunctional change investigates the idea of integrated monument protection, emphasizing the importance of continuous usage of the heritage that is elemental for the sustainability of a monument. The examples presented in the paper, the high-quality, well-functioning projects from the last 10 years of Central European architecture justify the raison d’etre of building rehabilitations.

Restricted access

During the last few years around a dozen boycotts have been called in Hungary; there are several ecologically and socially aware food-communities directly linking consumers and producers; at the end of 2006 a Fair Trade shop opened in Budapest, and there are product campaigns which accentuate various patriotic themes. All of these initiatives signal the emergence of new attitudes and values, a new type of behavior, that of ethical consumption . Ethical consumption, new kinds of consumer needs are influencing market culture through the creation of various market-niches (see corporate social responsibility); furthermore, the wide-scale spread of ethical consumption can even lead to the transformation of market functions. The modern market is going from a mainly economic space to an area of moral action, a tool of regulation and social participation. As a social movement ethical consumerism can effect political culture and play an important role in public policy aiming towards sustainable development. According to West-European literature as well as to concrete experience ethical consumerism is more and more playing this role, the local appearance of the movement beckons the question: what sort of values and institutions characterize this new consumer culture, and which of these can we encounter in Hungary? The first part of this study deals with the phenomena of ethical consumption: it gives an overview of the literature, explicating the main research themes, and introducing its distinctive, most often examined forms of action. In the second part of the study, out of the interpretational possibilities, I look at ethical consumption as political consumption, as a form of social governance, examining its relevance as a way of public participation. I try to find an answer to the question whether the spread of ethical consumption should be imagined at the demise of classical political institutions, or as complementary to them, and which ethical issues are most likely to mobilize the public. The study is primarily based on data describing Hungarian political participatory culture, as well as an attitude survey of a representative sample. At the end of the study I will briefly refer to the possible causes of differences in ethical consumption attitudes and behaviors.

Restricted access

. Political Issues and Processes. Frank Cass & Co., London, 13–44. Jordan, A. J.–Lenschow, A. (2008): Integrating the environment for sustainable development: An introduction. In: Jordan, A. J.–Lenschow, A.: Innovation in

Restricted access

. Andriantiatsaholiniaina , L.A. , Kouikoglou , V.S. and Phillis , Y.A. ( 2004 ). Evaluating strategies for sustainable development: Fuzzy logic reasoning and sensitivity analysis . Ecological Economics , 48 , 149 – 172

Restricted access