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, English Translation and Commentary 1998 Mazuz, H. (2014a): Polemical Treatment of the Story of the Annunciation of Isaac

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. C. S. Tang A. M. S. Wu 2012 Impulsivity as a moderator and mediator between life stress and pathological gambling among Chinese treatment

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This short essay overviews the changing image of the Ottomans in Hungarian historiography from the late 19th century to the 1990s. It maintains that whereas the Ottoman Empire had received a generally negative treatment from the nationalist historiographies of the empire’s successor states in the Balkans and the Middle East, Hungarian historiography has been more divided and has offered a more diverse view with regard to the country’s Ottoman centuries. As in the case of the biased treatment of the new nation-states of the Balkans and the Middle East, the more balanced Hungarian attitude has its political and cultural-historiographical background, which is briefly addressed in the paper.

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During the campaign of Amunhotep II in the year of nine a curious event took place that might be interpreted as death by burning prisoners. The possibility of this brutal treatment raises the question of the status of war-prisoners. This study gives particular attention to the lexicography of skr-'nh, the symbol of the complete and permanent submission as a possible form of captivity. Not just in the Memphis Stela but among the sources of Eighteenth Dynasty many examples have appeared that put the question of the treatment of prisoners in a different, new light.

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Prince Louis Lucien Bonaparte (1813--1891) was an important pioneer in the field of Basque, English, Italian and Sardinian dialectology, who deserves a much better treatment than what he has received in modern books of history of linguistics. The main aim of this research is to give more accurate information on this subject.

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The inventory of Béla Bartók’s original vocal compositions produces a heterogeneous impression: as regards to scoring, form, the derivation of the text, and the attitude of expression, the opera Bluebeard’s Castle, the two collections of songs opp. 15 and 16, Cantata profana for Soli, Choir and Orchestra, and the a cappella series Elmúlt időkből (From Bygone Times) and Twenty-Seven Two- and Three-Part Choruses apparently do not form a homogeneous group. However, they do share the common characteristic of being born as original music out of pre-existing texts. Stylistic features and peculiarities in the choice and the treatment of the texts do reveal some links and parallels between the original vocal works which reflect Bartók’s principles in the setting of texts and in the treatment of voices.

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In this paper I argue that the subtext for Ovid's positive portrayal of Diomedes at Rem. 151-167 is the Vergilian episode of Diomedes' reply to the embassy of the Latins (Aen. 11.252-93), and that the adjustment of this episode to the frame of Ovid's erotic didactic is achieved through a number of similarities in diction and theme. Ovid's treatment of the Vergilian Diomedes, however, is subversive and the Vergilian narrative is being undermined and reworked in a brand new way.

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The detailed treatment of the Latin supine has been neglected both in scholarly literature and in language teaching, even though it is a very ancient form that has survived in an interesting way and was used even in late Latin. The fact that the Latin supine has a parallel in Sanskrit deserves attention. In this study I demonstrate that Priscian projected the Latin usage of his own time back to classical Latin, which fact was nevertheless not detrimental to his credibility.

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According to Hermeneutics ch. 4, the analysis of non-assertive sentences such as wishes, commands, etc. belongs to rhetoric or poetics. They are, however, examined neither in the Rhetoric, nor in the Poetics, where in ch. 20 their treatment is explicitly excluded from the art of poetry and referred to that of delivery or performance. In this paper an explanation is given for this discrepancy, based on an interpretation of Aristotle's rejection of Protagoras' criticism of Homer.

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Eustathios, the illustrious scholar and clergyman of the 12th century AD, wrote a commentary to Pindar’s epinician odes, from which only the proem survives. Eustathios treatment of the lyric poet, his ideas and criteria of literary criticism have not been re-assessed since Kambylis’ interpretation and text edition (1991). The aim of this paper is to supply this re-evaluation. Besides, a new Homeric allusion and some evidence for Eustathios’ productive imitation of Pindar’s style are dealt with.

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