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The inventory of Béla Bartók’s original vocal compositions produces a heterogeneous impression: as regards to scoring, form, the derivation of the text, and the attitude of expression, the opera Bluebeard’s Castle, the two collections of songs opp. 15 and 16, Cantata profana for Soli, Choir and Orchestra, and the a cappella series Elmúlt időkből (From Bygone Times) and Twenty-Seven Two- and Three-Part Choruses apparently do not form a homogeneous group. However, they do share the common characteristic of being born as original music out of pre-existing texts. Stylistic features and peculiarities in the choice and the treatment of the texts do reveal some links and parallels between the original vocal works which reflect Bartók’s principles in the setting of texts and in the treatment of voices.

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In this paper I argue that the subtext for Ovid's positive portrayal of Diomedes at Rem. 151-167 is the Vergilian episode of Diomedes' reply to the embassy of the Latins (Aen. 11.252-93), and that the adjustment of this episode to the frame of Ovid's erotic didactic is achieved through a number of similarities in diction and theme. Ovid's treatment of the Vergilian Diomedes, however, is subversive and the Vergilian narrative is being undermined and reworked in a brand new way.

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The detailed treatment of the Latin supine has been neglected both in scholarly literature and in language teaching, even though it is a very ancient form that has survived in an interesting way and was used even in late Latin. The fact that the Latin supine has a parallel in Sanskrit deserves attention. In this study I demonstrate that Priscian projected the Latin usage of his own time back to classical Latin, which fact was nevertheless not detrimental to his credibility.

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According to Hermeneutics ch. 4, the analysis of non-assertive sentences such as wishes, commands, etc. belongs to rhetoric or poetics. They are, however, examined neither in the Rhetoric, nor in the Poetics, where in ch. 20 their treatment is explicitly excluded from the art of poetry and referred to that of delivery or performance. In this paper an explanation is given for this discrepancy, based on an interpretation of Aristotle's rejection of Protagoras' criticism of Homer.

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Eustathios, the illustrious scholar and clergyman of the 12th century AD, wrote a commentary to Pindar’s epinician odes, from which only the proem survives. Eustathios treatment of the lyric poet, his ideas and criteria of literary criticism have not been re-assessed since Kambylis’ interpretation and text edition (1991). The aim of this paper is to supply this re-evaluation. Besides, a new Homeric allusion and some evidence for Eustathios’ productive imitation of Pindar’s style are dealt with.

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This paper is an analysis of the narrative structure of the chronologically final part of Ahmedi’s (d. 1413) primary work İskendername , in terms of its perception of time and history. In so doing, it may be possible to examine how early Ottoman historiography dealt with the past and the present. In fact Ahmedi’s Dastān has been extensively used by scholars so far, but only as the focus of discussions on the Ghaza thesis, however, the examination of Ahmedi’s eclectic and sometimes anachronistic history and his treatment of time will provide us a theoretical perspective to the early Ottoman historiography, which has not yet been done in Ottoman studies.

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This paper aims to reexamine the arguments concerning the three main problems of the fragmentary Euripidean tragedy Phaethon , i.e. what character and conflict lies behind Phaethon's excessive reluctance to the marriage; who the mysterious bride is; and finally, what kind of exodos fits in the dramatic context on the basis of the fragmentary textual evidence. In my discussion Goethe's reconstruction is dealt with closely; moreover, the poet's suggestions prove to be valuable not only artistically, but philologically as well. Some personal bias of his treatment nevertheless hints at a new articulation of the Phaethontic character in the Euphorion-episode of FaustII and a general reevaluation of the hybris-drama.

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This article presents a Government Phonology (GP) analysis of disharmonic words in Turkish. According to GP, phonology is exceptionless. Following this claim, I will argue that the generalisations intended to capture vowel harmony in Turkish had been stated in the wrong way, leading to disharmonic words as an artefact of a faulty analysis. Once this is remedied, the exceptions vanish, allowing for a unified treatment of harmonic and disharmonic words. This also takes into account further details of the Turkish vowel system which had not been incorporated in previous analyses, as well as distributional asymmetries between stems and suffixes.

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In this paper I discuss Kenesei’s (2005) syntactic derivational approach to s complex event nominals in Hungarian, and I compare it with previous lexicalist analyses. I demonstrate that the facts that, according to Kenesei, call for a syntactic analysis (e.g., binding and control phenomena, anti-agreement, negation, and aspect) can be captured in an appropriately developed lexicalist framework with at least the same degree of efficiency, consistency and in a sufficiently principled manner. I outline the most important aspects of such an analysis in the framework of Lexical-Functional Grammar. I also point out that there are additional considerations which support a lexical treatment.

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The paper discusses the treatment of proverbial wisdom in Polish graffiti by drawing upon nearly 100 paremic structures collected on Polish Internet sites in the last decade. Proverbs in mural writing are classified as existential graffiti inscriptions due to their general rather than individualized reference. Graffiti writers challenge the potential of universal application of proverbs, paraphrazing the original forms, creating anti-proverbs in the process, with an eye to exposing the limited application of paremic wisdom or rejecting proverbs as entirely unsuitable in the context of modern Polish society. The paper explores the ways in which humour is employed in the use of proverbs in Polish murals.

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