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reasoning ability and irrational beliefs in problem gambling . International Gambling Studies , 7 , 157 – 172 . 10.1080/14459790701387428 Livingstone C. , & Woolley R. ( 2007 ). Risky business: A few provocations on the regulation of electronic

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.02245 Delfabbro , P. H. , & Winefeld , A. H. ( 2000 ). Predictors of irrational thinking in regular slot machine gamblers . The Journal of Psychology, 134 ( 2 ), 117 – 128 . doi: 10

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-009-9119-y Källmén , H. , Andersson , P. , & Andren , A. ( 2008 ). Are irrational

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substances ostensibly induced “madness,” clinically identifiable, but perceived as having divine origin by “simpleminded” Indigenous communities. This discourse was part of the image of the irrational and childish “savage.” The term psychedelic – mind

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utility theory have been used to explain that people's decision-making behaviour is irrational contrary to the expected utility hypothesis. Yet, using the subjective weights or subjectively weighted utilities to analyse the decision-making behaviour of

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poverty effect by declining prices. Indeed, the psychological insights help to explain an “irrational” deflation phobia. The endowment effect makes people more resistant to price deflation than price inflation as they do not want to lose assets they

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purchase insurance. Behavioral irrationality and wealth effects can distort an agent's purchasing decisions from the optimum. The agent's decision not to purchase insurance may more likely be the result of inadequate knowledge, insufficient savings, and

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preoccupation accompanied by a misunderstanding of gambling outcomes and irrational beliefs about the likelihood of winning ( Griffiths & Whitty, 2010 ; Svetieva & Walker, 2008 ). However, while chasing losses is often found among problem gamblers, it is also

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Gaëlle Challet-Bouju, Bastien Perrot, Lucia Romo, Marc Valleur, David Magalon, Mélina Fatséas, Isabelle Chéreau-Boudet, Amandine Luquiens, JEU Group, Marie Grall-Bronnec, and Jean-Benoit Hardouin

is a well-known measure of problem gambling severity, and the GABS measures cognitive biases, irrational beliefs, and positively valued attitudes to gambling ( Breen & Zuckerman, 1999 ). The formulations of the interview-based items are

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(“Leaving the venue to find money”); 11 items related to emotional responses (“Displayed anger in venues”); and 7 items relating to various other behaviors, such as drinking alcohol while gambling, a decline in grooming/appearance, irrational attributions

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