Search Results

You are looking at 81 - 90 of 292 items for :

  • "phonology" x
  • All content x
Clear All

The paper examines the development of the Hindi adjectival suffix vala, how the Sanskrit pala (m) 'guard, protector' was used figuratively, and after centuries how the phonologically changed form carries the extended meaning 'occupied with something'.

Restricted access

This paper discusses a phenomenon of Latin phonology, word-initial extrasyllabic s, a subcase of what is traditionally called s impurum. Extrasyllabic s behaves unlike other consonants in syllabification, especially at morpheme boundaries, where resyllabification takes place. The odd behaviour of initial extrasyllabic s in poetry is explained not on the basis of clashing metrical conventions but on the basis of principles inherent in the phonological system of Latin.

Restricted access
Acta Linguistica Hungarica
Authors: Zsófia Gyarmathy and Gábor Recski

Bárkányi, Zsuzsanna — Zoltán Kiss to appear. A phonetically-based approach to the phonology of v . A case study from Hungarian and Slovak. To appear in Interface explorations , Mouton de Gruyter, Berlin & New York

Full access

During speaking, the mental lexicon is accessed (i) to select the necessary words, and (ii) to retrieve their phonological and syntactic patterns. However, the nature of real-time activation of words and phonological rules is largely unknown. In Hungarian, voicing assimilation is a relatively strong phonological process prevailing both within and across words. While a lot is known about its phonological nature as well as its phonetic outcome, the temporal patterns of its implementation during speech production have not been analyzed yet. This paper deals with the temporal coding of voicing assimilation (i) in language acquisition, (ii) in spontaneous speech (of subjects of various ages), and (iii) in repetition tasks. Results show that (i) by the age of 4 Hungarian-speaking children acquire this phonological rule without mistakes, (ii) in spontaneous speech successful voicing assimilation depends on certain time limits partly depending also on the total temporal organization of speech coding, and (iii) without the higher-level semantic and syntactic organization of speech (shadowing task), subjects are not able to plan the encoding of voicing assimilation processes as securely as they do in spontaneous speech.

Full access
Pszichológia
Authors: László Séra, György Révész, Dóra Vajda, and Róbert Járai

.pdf . 30. Kinsey , K. , Hansen , P. C. , Chase , C. H. ( 2006 ): Dorsal stream associations with orthographic and phonological processing . NeuroPeport , 17 , 335 – 339

Restricted access

There are several phonological categories whose markedness-as inferred from typical markedness metrics- fails to match the representational complexity posited for them. More specifically, glottal stops, geminate clusters, and onsetless syllables are representationally the simplest of their category, yet other criteria, like implicational hierarchies, mark them as special. This paper aims at comprehending this paradox.

Full access

-179). Lexical conservativism 157 179 Szigetvári, Péter (1999) VC Phonology: a theory of consonant lenition and phonotactics. PhD Dissertation, Eötvös Loránd

Restricted access

Archangeli, Diana — Keiichiro Suzuki 1997. The Yokuts challenge. In: Iggy Roca (ed.): Derivations and constraints in phonology, 197–226. Clarendon Press, Oxford. Suzuki K

Full access

This article defines convenience in foreign language teaching as a neces­sity to adapt teaching process to students' needs and expectations. On the basis of their teaching experience with Chinese learners, Ms Charmet and Ms Martin present a thorough error analysis and thus propose a method which is conform to Chinese way of thinking as well as to Chinese learning habits: amusing activities which lead students from repetition drills to a reflective and creative language use, with special attention to phonological difficulties.

Restricted access

This study presents some of the most important phonological and grammatical phenomena which show the evolution of Late Latin in the Roman province of Britannia. The investigation is based on a corpus of inscriptions on stone (established by Collingwood and Wright). The Vulgar Latin of Britannia seems not very different from that of other provinces, but the progression of certain changes is slower. The author insists on the different origins of soldiers and colonists who took part in the romanization of the island.

Restricted access