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. Chen , Xinren and Juanjuan Ren . 2018 . ‘We’re family’: Kinship term generalization in Chinese Ph.D. research seminars . Paper presented at the 4th International Conference of the American Pragmatics Association , University at Albany, SUNY

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“There is no nation without history, there is no family without a family tree”

On Sibe ethnic nationalist aspirations through the example of a “family tree unification” story

Acta Ethnographica Hungarica
Author: Ildikó Gyöngyvér Sárközi

(韩)家谱研究 [Examination of the Family Tree of the Hashihuli (Han) Clan From Biantai]. In YONG Zhijian 永志坚 - Guo Eryuan 郭元儿 (ed) Xibozu yanpu wenji 锡伯 族研究文集 [A Collection of Sibe Research], Wulumuqi 乌鲁朱齐,Xinjiang Renmin Chubanshe 新疆人民出版社. 211 – 225 . H e Ling 贺灵

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References Cited Andric , Jasna 1972 Zadruga, novija istrazivanja, njihova svrha i rezultati [Zadruga (the Extended Family), More Recent Research, its Aim and Results] . Etnoloski pregled 10 : 57 – 76 . Bicanic , Rudol 1936 Kako

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: Andorka , Rudolf (Ed.), Gyermek, család, történelem . [Child, family, history]. Budapest, Századvég, Andorka Rudolf Társadalomtudományi Társaság, 249–282. Andorka R. Gyermek, család, történelem 2001

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. L. H. Jaycox R. L. Repetti 1993 Conflict in families and the psychological adjustment of preadolescent children Journal of

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Ungleichheit in der osteuropäischen Landwirtschaft. Zwei Fallstudien aus Ungarn und Rumänien 2003 Zsigmond , Gábor 1978: Az 1960–70-es évek fordulójának családtípusa [Family type at the turn of the 1960

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Summary

The aim of this paper is to investigate the role of Anubis as a member of the “Isiac Family” (Isis–Osiris/Sarapis–Horus/Harpokrates–Anubis) during the Hellenistic and Roman age. A new religious-historical analysis allows us to detect more or less profound changes of Anubis' ancient religious meaning due to the transfer from Egypt to Greece and Rome. The spread of this cult from its motherland to the Hellenistic world and subsequently to the Roman Empire caused, as well, the creation of its new religious identity.

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This paper explores the portraits of a number of Tarsia family members who served as dragomans to the Venetian Republic in the late 17th century. The portraits are currently kept in the Koper Museum in Slovenia. In this study I consider dragomans as cultural intermediaries; just like commercial brokers and religious converts, dragomans historically occupied the contact zones where different cultures met and clashed. Dragomans can be considered “trans-imperial” subjects because they straddled political, linguistic and cultural boundaries between empires, in this case the Ottoman Empire and Venice. This professional group also pioneered the introduction of new customs and manners in the field of culture and arts. This study explores dragomans as clients and patrons of artists, an aspect with emerged as a part and parcel of their role as influential cultural intermediaries in the early modern Mediterranean. Portraits of Tarsia family members are among the earliest known to have been commissioned by dragomans. The patronage extended by such families of dragomans as the Tarsias demonstrates their social standing. These portraits exemplify the active role of dragomans as powerful cultural agents and serve as documentary evidence of the manners, dress codes, and professional symbols of dragomans.

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The present article offers new evidence on the Unger playing-card making family of Győr, Western Transdanubia, as the result of a cross-disciplinary study. Mátyás Unger the Elder (1789–1862) and his like-named son Mátyás the Younger (1824–1878) produced various types of playing-cards from the early to mid-19th century. In particular, their cards, their iconography, design and production process will be analysed. The family is best known for their cards with Sopron (Oedenburg) pattern. Also discussed will be the role of Mátyás the Elder’s second eldest son Alajos Unger as a possible designer of the later Unger cards, which were of considerably higher quality than the earlier known ones by Mátyás Unger the Elder. The hitherto little-known Alajos Unger was trained as a draughtsman and painter first at the National Drawing School of his hometown and then, between 1833 and 1842, at the Vienna Academy of Fine Arts, particularly under Leopold Kupelwieser (1796–1862). Finally an innovative outside-in bottom-up method for gaining further, reliable insight into 19th century artisanal playing-card manufacturing will be proposed to determine the size, output and profitability of the Unger workshop based on material-flow simulation.

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Summary

In this paper paintings from the collection of Count Joseph Brunswick (1750–1827) formerly in his Castle in Dolná Krupá (Alsókorompa) are presented and analyzed.

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