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– Fülemile , Ágnes 2004 Társadalom, tájszerkezet, identitás Kalotaszegen. Fejezetek a regionális csoportképzés történeti folyamatairól. [Society, Landscape Structure and Identity in Kalotaszeg. Chapters about the Historical Processes of Regional Group

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The notion of the name semiotic landscape The description of the linguistic landscape is one of the relatively new and dynamically developing topics of sociolinguistics, whose focus includes name use in signage as well. Definitions of the notion of

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Drawing on established connections between Roman identity and an agricultural landscape, this paper examines how the imagery of disrupted pastoral and agrarian landscapes and characters represent the effects of civil war on the Roman people in Vergil’s Aeneid and Lucan’s Bellum Civile. While disturbance and turmoil are already a part of the natural landscape in Vergil’s Eclogues and Georgics, in epic, a genre that concerns itself with how empire and imperial power mediate Roman identity, the displacement of shepherds and agriculture partially redefines Roman identity in militaristic terms. Vergil’s pastoral characters, written into military roles as civic landscapes displace agrarian ones in the Aeneid, survive but fail to find a place in Lucan’s ruined and desolate Pharsalian landscape in the Bellum Civile. There, the broken natural landscape, unfit for agriculture, pastoralism, or trade, mirrors the redefinition of what is “Roman” and the occlusion of Rome’s link to an idealized bucolic past.

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1995 Landscape and Power in Vienna . Baltimore : The Johns Hopkins University Press . S almi , Hannu 2010 Europa XIX wieku. Historia

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This paper reconstructs Ruskin’s work from the perspective of the landscape, building upon the assumption that Modern Painters played a cardinal role in the emancipation of the genre. This reconstruction is complicated by the internal contradictions within the work: it cannot be regarded as a systematic work of philosophy, but belongs rather to the genre of sage writing. In volume I, Ruskin approached the landscape not from an aesthetic point of view, but from the direction of scientific truth. The aesthetic consequence of this was his anti-mimetic attitude, which differentiated between the imitation of nature and the uncovering of the truths of nature, and in this respect, he considered Turner the greatest master who had ever lived. Truth takes precedence over all aesthetic considerations, and for this reason Ruskin was resolutely against artistic tradition. Seen from his perspective, the history of landscape painting appeared as a series of scientific illustrations, which, with the forward march of science, came ever closer to truth-to-nature. The other two essential conditions of art, the other side of truth, were its moral and religious messages. Beauty is the work of God, and God must be praised in His work, in Nature. Only later did Ruskin introduce a historical dimension to the experience of the landscape. The modern era is characterised by the rise of the pre-eminent interest in the landscape, accompanied by a parallel decreasing interest in gods, saints, ancestors and humans. This later became the main motif of Ruskin’s activities as a social critic and reformer. In relation to the loss of faith and the prospect of regaining it, Ruskin saw landscape painting as the representative art of the modern era. In the later volumes of Modern Painters, Ruskin carefully distinguished between the task of science, which is to investigate the essence and uncover the truths of material nature, and the task of art, which is to explore the possible viewpoints or aspects of material nature. In volume V of Modern Painters he firmly asserted – in diametric contradiction to his earlier views – that the greatness and truth of Turner did not rest on scientific truth, for in this respect the artist was completely ignorant. This paper interprets and evaluates Ruskin’s extraordinarily harsh criticism of Claude Lorrain, which contrasts with the fact that Turner spent almost his entire life idolising and attempting to rival Claude.

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The southwest border of Roman Dacia was at the same time a sector of the external frontier of the Roman Empire. A research project of a team from the Chair for Ancient History and Archaeology of the Babeş-Bolyai University Cluj-Napoca took as goal a survey with new methods of the Roman forts, roads and the landscape on this frontier sector. The GPS coordinates and the characteristics of the landscape for each fort have been recorded. The results are presented in a text and in several detailed maps.

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1 Introduction: the current landscape of phonological theory The current theoretical landscape in phonology (at the end of the second decade of the 21st century) is healthily diverse (cf. Hannahs & Bosch 2017, chapter 1). One way to show this is to

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. Lipták , Anikó (ed.). 2009 a. Correlatives cross-linguistically . Amsterdam & Philadelphia : John Benjamins . Lipták , Anikó . 2009 b. The landscape of

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Looking at two descriptions of landscape in Lucan’s Bellum Civile (the sacred grove near Massilia and the Libyan desert), we will try to show that the poet uses bucolic elements to depict some places. However, he does not use these pastoral elements to describe a locus amoenus but a locus horridus. Lucan’s landscape can be defined as an inversion and a subversion of the bucolic one.

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This article explores Carol Ann Duffy's love poetry, arguing that language, and love itself are presented as a journeying towards the other. Language is expressive of estrangement, but also of a constant reaching out into the phenomenal world. The landscapes and scenes of these poems describe spaces where subject and object, word and thing partake of one another, albeit incompletely. The homesickness which emerges is not sentimental, but an indicator of the located nature of the self.

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