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. Collins , K. M. T. , Onwuegbuzie , A. J. , & Jiao , Q. G. 2007 . A Mixed Methods Investigation of Mixed Methods Sampling Designs in Social and Health Science Research . Journal of Mixed Methods Research Vol. 1 . No. 3 . 267 – 294

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Abstract

Background and aims

This article presents a mixed methods study of challenging psychedelic experiences or “bad trips”, with the aim of exploring the nature and characteristics of such experiences. While challenging psychedelic experiences have been studied in previous research, the article posits that the focus of this research has been overly narrow in terms of the characteristics and etiology of these experiences, and that it would be helpful to broaden our understanding of what a challenging psychedelic trip might be and how it affects users.

Methods

In the first study, respondents (N = 38) were recruited at various online fora for individual anonymous interviews via private messaging. The Cannabis and Psychedelics User Survey used for the second study was constructed on the basis of the knowledge obtained from interviews, and recruited 319 participants (median age 33; 81% male) from seven different online communities. Respondents were asked to characterize both a typical and their worst psychedelic experience, allowing for comparisons between the two and for regression analyses of associations between challenging experiences and other factors.

Results

Both in interviews and in the survey, respondents reported a broader range of characteristics for challenging psychedelic experiences than what has previously been recognized in the research literature. Despite the often dramatic narratives, they were convinced that the experience had positive long-term consequences.

Conclusions

The two studies found that challenging psychedelic experiences have a greater thematic range than what has previously been identified. Besides the near ubiquity of fear in these experiences, confusion was also identified as an important aspect. Meditation practice had paradoxical effects on challenging psychedelic experiences, appearing as a fruitful area for further research.

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Abstract

The Science of Science and Innovation Policy (SciSIP) program at the National Science Foundation (NSF) supports research designed to advance the scientific basis of science and innovation policy. The program was established at NSF in 2005 in response to a call from Dr. John Marburger III, then science advisor to the U.S. President, for a “science” of science policy. As of January 2011, it has co-funded 162 awards that aim to develop, improve, and expand data, analytical tools, and models that can be directly applied in the science policy decision making process. The long-term goals of the SciSIP program are to provide a scientifically rigorous and quantitative basis for science policy and to establish an international community of practice. The program has an active listserv that, as of January 2011, has almost 700 members from academia, government, and industry. This study analyzed all SciSIP awards (through January 2011) to identify existing collaboration networks and co-funding relations between SciSIP and other areas of science. In addition, listserv data was downloaded and analyzed to derive complementary discourse information. Key results include evidence of rich diversity in communication and funding networks and effective strategies for interlinking researcher and science policy makers, prompting discussion, and resource sharing.

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deepening understanding of the concept, as well as potentially providing indications of best practice, and the role of the subcultures in the market orientation of a university. A mixed-method study was undertaken to uncover as much as possible about

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and interpret the connection between aptitude and learning habits of the participants is the aim of the research. Mixed methods design was employed in this research to explore the language aptitude of the participants and to gain deeper understanding

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not offer any interview excerpts to capture her participants' perceptions of their PT experience. The mixed-method study reported in this paper attempts to address this research gap by focussing on the fee-paid tutoring that some first-year Kazakhstani

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Franziska Motka, Bettina Grüne, Pawel Sleczka, Barbara Braun, Jenny Cisneros Örnberg, and Ludwig Kraus

German- or English-language; using quantitative, qualitative, or mixed methods; and reporting sample size. Relevant studies had to examine a sample of self-excluders, at least as a subgroup, who excluded themselves for terrestrial and/or online gambling

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Christian Nyemcsok, Samantha L. Thomas, Amy Bestman, Hannah Pitt, Mike Daube, and Rebecca Cassidy

collection Interviewer-assisted, mixed method surveys (composed of discrete choice and open ended questions) were completed on a digital device using the Qualtrics software offline application, and took 10–12 min to complete. The following sections

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This article sets out to contribute to the debate and discussions on methodological approaches in news translation, focusing on a specific research question in a specific news context, namely community radio news in South Africa. Multilingualism and translation in community media has not been problematized within translation studies. In South Africa, research on multilingualism and the media has focused mainly on language planning and language policy, rather than practice. The hypothesis guiding this paper is that the multilingual nature of community radio in South Africa necessarily implies a multiple flow of translation into and from the country’s eleven official languages. The aim is, thus, to explore and describe the multilingual community radio landscape in the Free State province of South Africa, to map the translation flow. A mixed methods research design is followed to collect data and provide answers to the research questions posed.

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The translator’s job-related happiness has scarcely been researched in empirical Translation Studies. This article presents part of the findings from a large empirical study in which a mixed method approach (i.e. quantitative and qualitative approaches are combined) is employed to study the topic. The analysis is based on a questionnaire answered by 193 Chinese translators in greater China. This study statistically shows that the more visible the translator, the happier they are. In addition, the more visible the translator, the less the gap between capital sought and capital received. We also confirm the hypothesis that the more visible the translator, the more and greater positive emotions they experience when they deal with translation.

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