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. Collins , K. M. T. , Onwuegbuzie , A. J. , & Jiao , Q. G. 2007 . A Mixed Methods Investigation of Mixed Methods Sampling Designs in Social and Health Science Research . Journal of Mixed Methods Research Vol. 1 . No. 3 . 267 – 294

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This article sets out to contribute to the debate and discussions on methodological approaches in news translation, focusing on a specific research question in a specific news context, namely community radio news in South Africa. Multilingualism and translation in community media has not been problematized within translation studies. In South Africa, research on multilingualism and the media has focused mainly on language planning and language policy, rather than practice. The hypothesis guiding this paper is that the multilingual nature of community radio in South Africa necessarily implies a multiple flow of translation into and from the country’s eleven official languages. The aim is, thus, to explore and describe the multilingual community radio landscape in the Free State province of South Africa, to map the translation flow. A mixed methods research design is followed to collect data and provide answers to the research questions posed.

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Across Languages and Cultures
Authors: Chantal Gagnon, Pier-Pascale Boulanger, and Esmaeil Kalantari

This article deals with some of the theoretical and methodological problems that arise when working with a bilingual comparable (i.e., non-parallel) journalistic corpus of financial news that is relatively large (9 million words). The corpus under study comprises two sets of texts drawn from Canadian French and English newspapers in the years between the Tech Wreck of 2001 and the financial crisis of 2007−2008. Following Davier (2015) who advocates for a broadened definition of news translation that includes intralingual activity, the authors make a case for the study of intralingual translation, or rewording, which is a fundamental feature of financial news, as journalists work to popularize specialized knowledge for lay audiences. The methodological challenges of surveying interlingual translation in a sizeable corpus of financial news are discussed in relation with the production of news in Canada. A pilot study using the lexical item “subprime” and its French equivalents illustrates how interlingual and intralingual translation can be investigated in a corpus comprising 18,601 news items. The authors explain how they apply a mixed-method approach (Saldanha and O’Brien 2013) that is based on the interaction between qualitative and quantitative analysis in their research on news translation.

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, Iasi, Romania, March 21–27, 2010. Creswell , J. W. 2009 . Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches . Los Angeles : Sage

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Across Languages and Cultures
Authors: Tobias Haug, Karen Bontempo, Lorraine Leeson, Jemina Napier, Brenda Nicodemus, Beppie Van den Bogaerde, and Myriam Vermeerbergen

. Palinkas , L. A. , Horwitz , S. M. , Green , C. A. , Wisdom , J. P. , Duan , N. & Hoagwood , K. 2015 . Purposeful Sampling for Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis in Mixed Method Implementation Research . Administration and

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Information Leaflets: Translation Experts or Expert Translators? A Mixed Methods Study of Lay-friendliness . Aarhus : Aarhus University, Aarhus School of Business and Social Sciences. PhD thesis

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, S. , Aggarwal , Y. 2018 . Happiness at Work Scale: Construction and Psychometric Validation of a Measure Using a Mixed Method Approach . Journal of Happiness Studies Vol. 19 . No. 5 . 1439 – 1463 . Retrieved November 20, 2017 from

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The translator’s job-related happiness has scarcely been researched in empirical Translation Studies. This article presents part of the findings from a large empirical study in which a mixed method approach (i.e. quantitative and qualitative approaches are combined) is employed to study the topic. The analysis is based on a questionnaire answered by 193 Chinese translators in greater China. This study statistically shows that the more visible the translator, the happier they are. In addition, the more visible the translator, the less the gap between capital sought and capital received. We also confirm the hypothesis that the more visible the translator, the more and greater positive emotions they experience when they deal with translation.

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