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That is the program of the International Conference of the Bartók Archives Budapest: “Bartóks's Orbit. The Context and Sphere of Influence of His Work”. Opening Ceremony of the Conference (21 March, 2006); Conference Program (22-24 March, 2006): Opening Address, Keynote speech, Interpreting the Stage Works, New Approaches to Bartók's Style, Reconsidering Bartók's Folklorism, Emerging Work on Bartók: I. Approaches to His Style and Work, II. Parallels to Bartók's Work, III. Influences on and form Bartók's Work, IV. Bartók's Influence Revealed; The Absorption of Influence in Bartók's Work; Bartók Reception; Concluding Remarks.

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The aims of the conference under the title “Bartók's Orbit,” held at the Institute for Musicology of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Budapest between March 22 and 24, 2006 to celebrate the 125th anniversary of Béla Bartók's birth, were not modest. Its main purpose was to reexamine Bartók's place and significance in the history of twentieth-century music. Paper proposals were selected by a committee. Sixty contributors coming from twenty-one countries (including Hongkong, Russia, a number of European countries and the United States) were finally accepted. Official languages of the international conference were English, French and German. The main topics of the sessions were the following: Interpreting the stage works, New approaches to Bartók's style, Reconsidering Bartók's folklorism, The absorption of influences in Bartók's works, Bartók reception. The Introduction - based on the original call for papers and the opening address read at the first session of the conference - explains that the main aim of the conference was to reevaluate Bartók's international significance. Apart from revisiting key issues, the papers also drew on a number of less well-known sources thereby responding to the organizers' wish to reveal some of the more hidden connections of Bartók's music to the music of others especially for whom he was, or still remains, a very personal experience. The Introduction finally also considers the inspiration behind the title, “Bartók's Orbit,” an astronomical term that can mean a planet's path as well as its sphere of influence.

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, and should remain “spiritually: in the same mood dimension.” These abilities “require poetic empathy and total absorption.” 4 Bartók and Kodály viewed the possible solutions relating to harmonization similarly, the most important of which was that the

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examination sub-samples were taken at every 2 cm intervals and the commonly used loss on ignition method was applied. 27 The element composition of the water solutions was examined with a PerkinElmer AAnalyst 100 atomic absorption spectrophotometer. 28 The

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manually scraped surface although grave no. 377 could be observed there. Only some moist spots of vague outlines indicated that a disturbed soil, looser than the unbroken ground with different absorption qualities, can be found under the sand filling. On

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The article deals with various therapeutic aspects of writing down one's requests and problems in a so called pilgrim book. With help of text passages people's strategies and different scopes are illustrated. Simple formulas e.g. established within the religious context can help to bridge speechlessness and silence, the falling back on traditionally proven forms and behaviours may create a certain feeling of security. Certain tendencies of “using” religion become apparent: religion has to place categories at people's disposal to compensate experiences of contingency connected with pressing problems, personal crises and social border experiences. The “benefits” of the religious system are in demand above all in the case of individual crises, where the social mechanisms of contingency absorption do not work any more or do not work enough. The article focuses also on the specific communication with God, Jesus or Mary: as they “know” what people mean, there is no risk to be misunderstood. The pilgrim book figures as mirror of longings, deficits, doubts and fantasies in recent societies.

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