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1999 : Condolence Books . In: Walter , Tony (ed.), The Mourning for Diana . Oxford & New York : Berg , 203 – 214 . Walter , Tony 2011 : Angels not Souls: Popular Religion in the Online Mourning for British Celebrity Jade Goody . Reli

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-roles and argument selection . Language 67 . 547 – 619 . Dziwirek , Katarzyna . 1994 . Polish subjects . New York : Garland . Fábregas , Antonio , Ángel L. Jiménez-Fernández and Mercedes Tubino . forthcoming. What’s up with datives ? In

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Abstract

This contribution presents the concept of 'seven heavens' as preserved by eight manuscripts of Muhammad ibn 'Abdallah al-Kisâ'ï's collections of Islamic religious tales Kitab A’ğāi’b al-MalakUt and Qisas al-Anbiyā It focuses on and compares the contents and composition of the chapter devoted to the topic and analyses the variations in the mss., which shed light on the way the tales are transmitted. Some of them represent variability in the original information, whereas others (including significant semantic shifts) may easily have emerged as a result of even minor scribal lapses.

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. Ilyen például a velencei San Marco keresztelőkápolnájának mozaikja és a riofreddói SS. Annunziata oratóriumának freskója (vö.: Joan Barclay Lloyd: The Trinity amid the Hierarchies of Angels: A lost fresco from S. Clemente in Rome and iconographic

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In this paper, the authors present the linguistic image of angel in Polish and Hungarian phraseological units. The analysis of the material shows that the cognitive basis of this concept is made up of several domains and conceptualizations. In both languages, the image of angel is in most cases similar to and corresponds with the human behaviour but in some cases evidently differs, too.

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In the 15thcentury, an Orthodox diocese came into being in the north-eastern corner of the Hungarian Kingdom. The centre of the diocese was the town of Munkács. As Munkács is located in the crossroads of cultures and nations, the artifacts produced in the diocese all reflect a vivid connection between northern and southern, eastern and western civilizations. The Mandylion, more typical as a mural in Byzantine art, is one of the most important subjects of icon paintings produced in the 15th–16thcenturies. In this icon the portrait of Jesus on the shawl is complemented with erect figures of archangels. In the Deisis version the angels follow the shawl with awe and worship. The notion of showing up the relic appears in several versions. The angels are either in the background, raising the holy shawl, or show it up with a ceremonial gesture. The versions show the influence of the northern Russian iconography on the one hand, and the effects of late Gothic style on the other. These influences show the changing attitudes of the artists. The Mandylion of Lukov, surviving in the Diocese of Munkács (Mucatchevo) is preserved today in the Slovakian National Gallery in Bratislava. It is one of the rare examples where the central picture is complete with side scenes, depicting an oriental version of the Acheiropoeitos-legend. There are two similar surviving icons, which appear to follow the traditions of icon painting in Moldova. The Mandylion appears as a part of the visual system of the iconostasion of the Carpathians, in the central axis of the Celebration, or as a supraport of the Royal Gate. The ancient Apotropeion-type picture, surrounded with scenes depicting the sacrifice of the Apostles, receives an Eucharistic meaning. In this way it is close to the meaning and function of the western depictions of Veronica's shawl.

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The parallel between the incarnation of the Word and the materialization of the picture may have contributed to the emergence of the legend that St Luke was the painter of the Virgin. When the saint painted a colourful, i.e., lifelike portrait of the Virgin and her child, he brought to life the incarnate Word authentically, hence proving the truth of incarnation. Some depictions of St Luke the painter clearly suggest that the saint's work assumed its materiality as a result of incarnation, upon the intervention of the celestial sphere. Colour is one of the tokens of reality; in several cases it is colour that the physician-painter owed to the heavenly sphere. These include the illustration in Johannes von Troppau's evangeliarium, and the representations of the painting saint in which an angel helps Luke to grind pigment. Rogier van der Weyden's St Luke paints a portrait of the Virgin which is on a par with the old akheiropoietos of miraculous genesis. The same intention is detectable in Jan van Eyck's Holy Face representation.

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The figure to the right of the Madonna on Albrecht Altdorfer's small painting in the Vienna Art History Museum could never be convincingly named. Whereas the older bald man on the left expands the group into a “Holy Family”, the youthful figure with blonde curls had been called an angel or John the Evangelist only with considerable reservation. Designation of this figure as the early Christian martyr Agapitus of Praeneste, however, makes it possible to explain all his characteristics (his youthful appearance, the bowl of glowing coals with which he was martyred, the deacon's clothing). This identification as St. Agapitus, who is venerated in only a few places, makes it possible to establish a connection between the painting and the Upper Austrian Benedictine monastery at Kremsmünster, where the major share of the saint's relics are located. A tradition of representing the saint as a deacon had developed there, as shown by examples from book illumination and sculpture. Abbot Johannes I Schreiner, a confidant of Emperor Maximilian, could either have ordered or been the recipient of the painting, which is dated 1515. The exquisite design of the Altdorfer painting, with the almost capricious treatment of the northern Italian picture type of the close-up half-length figure beneath lush hanging fruit, could have been made especially to suit the abbot's humanist taste. The painting differs in this respect from other Madonna paintings by Altdorfer which were conceived as devotional images

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St John of God is the patron saint of booksellers and bookbinders. An engraving by Joseph Anton Schmidt of Augsburg depicts him, still in civilian clothes, in a baroque printing office of the engraver’s time, around 1770. Johann Andreas Pfeffel jr. made an engraved portrait of his father with a German text of 8 lines under it. My collection has two engravings from around 1670 showing engraving workshops.

Hereafter I am going to list types of Christ. In Johann Andreas Pfeffel sr.’s composition the triumphant Saviour is standing on the instruments of Passion on top of Golgotha, with the flag of Easter in his right hand. His favourite disciple is holding to a rope lowered by the Heavenly Father, his feet treading on the column of the flagellation. The meaning of the allegorical picture is illumined by a quotation from St John’s Gospel (6,44). The Lord Triumphing over Death is reminiscent of a painting by Giovanni Battista Tinti: the blood flowing from Jesus’s heart is gathered by an angel in a cup. Christ’s foot is treading on a skull, he is holding his cross with the wreath of thorns. The mannerist painter of Parma drew inspiration from Michelangelo’s Risen Christ in Rome’s S. Maria sopra Minerva. In a book illustration Pfeffel depicts the blood and water from the side of the transfigured Saviour as the material of the Eucharist, adoring angels gathering it in a chalice and a pitcher.

In Buda’s Víziváros district, on the first side altar on the right in the former Franciscan church (later belonging to the sisters of St Elizabeth) a painted version of the votive statue of Vir Dolorum in Matrei in Tyrol, of which János Fülöp Binder made an engraving, was venerated.

Two monumental works by Michelangelo Buonarroti convey the mystery of Easter. The statue of Jesus in BasBassano Romano was made by Michelangelo earlier (1514- 16) and can thus be taken as precedent to the sculpture of a similar theme in S. Maria sopra Minerva (1521). The dominant attribute is the cross. In the earlier sculpture, in addition to the ropes, sponge and loincloth, the robe of mockery is dropped by Christ’s left hand onto the column of his flogging, which also serves as support.

There is a short red jasper column in the middle of a recess opening from the St Zeno chapel in Rome’s Basilica di S Prassede. Cardinal Giovanni Colonna, the commander of the papal army of the fifth crusade (1219) brought it home from the Holy Land and set it up in 1223. It is allegedly the column of Christ’s flagellation. The Greek emperor Alexios I Komnenos listed the relics kept in Constantinople in 1092: he already mentioned the purple robe and the reed. A register of 1200 includes the sponge, the purple chlamys and the reed in the sanctuary of Hagia Sophia. After the transfer of the relics to Rome, the reed with the sponge could be found in the reliquary of the Sancta Sanctorum in the Lateran. The Lord’s loincloth was preserved in the cathedral of Aachen visited by pilgrims for plenary indulgence as late as the 16th century.

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In this monographic study the life and the works of the Austrian sculptor Andreas Schroth is elaborated for the first time. He studied from 1803 at the Vienna Academy of Fine Arts in the classes of Franz Anton Zauner and Johann Martin Fischer. He was awarded in 1816 by a Silver medal and from 1818 to 1820 he was a Stipendiate. During his Prague stay in 1820–21 the bust of Count Joseph Colloredo was made. From 1823 to 1835 on behalf of Archbishop Sándor Rudnay he worked in Esztergom, and has contributed mainly decorative sculptures to the Neo-Classic Cathedral in construction. In 1823–24 he created the two statues of Genii in the entrance of the crypt, and between 1831–36 he made eight reliefs with the representations of the feasts of the Virgin for the Esztergom Church of St. Anne. In 1829 he made drawings illustrating the local almanach Urania, as well as the marble bust of Marshall Joseph Colloredo for the Vienna Arsenal on behalf of Emperor Francis I. In the years between 1830 and 1835 he was working for the Benedictine Abbey of Pannonhalma. Only fragments are preserved of the big lead relief decorating the West facade of the Abbey Church. After his return to Vienna he worked in 1838 in Esztergom on the Station reliefs of the Calvary and also for the Count Anton Keglevich in North Hungary. He transformed the facade of the Bohemian Church in Boskovice in 1844, and the relief of the Dead Christ between angels for the Abbey Church in Melk was made in the same year.

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