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Fauna (last part), poisons and antidote, arms used by Indians for hunting and fishing . This article is a transcript and French translation of the last four chapters (7 to 10) of Book 2 of the Latin manuscript by the Jesuit F. X. Eder on the missions or reductions in the Amerindian nations of the Moxos and Baures. It is the continuation of the first six articles on the Jesuit missions in the now-Bolivian Amazon basin in the 18th century , entitled:

  1. 1. Lima, Peru, and their inhabitants in the 18th century.
  2. 2. Jesuit missions in the now-Bolivian Amazon basin in the 18th century.
  3. 3. Quality of the soil and description of the Indians.
  4. 4. Constructive works, beliefs and superstitions of the Indians, and how to convince them to join a reduction.
  5. 5. Trees, fruits, plants and mammals.
  6. 6. Birds, hunting, crocodiles, dolphins, fishes and fishing.

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Literature’s probably most famous magical plant is moly . It first appears in the Odyssey where Hermes gives Odysseus an antidote against Circe’s magic — its flower is white, its root is black and it is hard for mortal men to dig. For more than two thousand years it had been referred to in hundreds of works including Galen and Dioscorides, it was discussed in medieval herbaria and collections of prescriptions. Many have tried to identify moly but there is no unequivocal result. In my work I make an attempt to point out the most possible identification of the Homeric plant, its relation to the medieval herba immolum as well as toxic honey.

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Relations. An Antidote to the Turkish, Sumerian and Other Poison] . Budapest : Tinta . Hosford , Desmond – Wojtkowski , Chong J. (eds) 2010 French Orientalism: Culture, Politics, and the Imagined Other . Newcastle : Cambridge Scholars

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Choice of a spouse, feasts and games, meals, food and drink, handicraft and arts . This article is a transcript and French translation of the first five chapters of Book 3 of the Latin manuscript by the Jesuit F. X. Eder on the missions or reductions in the Amerindian nations of the Moxos and Baures. It is the continuation of the first seven articles on the Jesuit missions in the now-Bolivian Amazon basin in the 18th century , entitled:

  1. 1. Lima, Peru, and their inhabitants in the 18th century.
  2. 2. Jesuit missions in the now Bolivian Amazon basin in the 18th century.
  3. 3. Quality of the soil and description of the Indians.
  4. 4. Constructive works, belief and superstitions of the Indians, and how to convince them to join a reduction.
  5. 5. Trees, fruits, plants and mammals.
  6. 6. Birds, hunting, crocodiles, dolphins, fishes and fishing.
  7. 7. Fauna (last part), poisons and antidote, arms used by Indians for hunting and fishing.

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Abstract  

September 11 may thus be an instance where, tragically, “reality” seems to clash with the truth claims of postcolonial studies. If the credo of postcolonial studies is that hybridity is in itself an antidote to every form and kind of fundamentalism, the events of September 11 seemed to prove that hybridity can in fact coexist with fundamentalism. Not entirely in opposition to postcolonial studies but nevertheless trying to call for its extension in disciplinary terms, this paper suggests that there may in fact be a need for us to (re)turn to two paradigms in particular: the growing field of what is called “citizenship studies”, and the method of Critical Race Theory. Both paradigms, it could be argued, put emphasis on both the historical and the national. There may thus not only be a need for thinking “beyond” the postcolonial, but to inquire into the fields which postcolonial studies (despite its impressive disciplinary and geographical scope) tends to disregard; and to ask whether these fields may not in fact be seen as being complimentary to postcolonial studies or even as being productive alternatives to it.

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Abstract  

It is not necessary to introduce Amin Maalouf, whose national and international reputation has been earned and well established over the past twenty years; his works have been translated into more than thirty languages. Focused onLes identités meurtrières, published in 1998, our article aims at pointing out where its strength lies. This essay appears as an essential contribution to the issue ofidentity which is common to literature as such but which emerges to an exceptionally high degree in francophone literatures. Clearly against the withdrawal attitude leading to shutting off a community from the rest of the world, Amin Maalouf pleads in favour of negotiation between, on the one hand, the sense of belonging as part of one’s identity and, on the other, the necessity of being part and parcel of modernity. He shows that personal construction and initiative are indeed very powerful antidotes against globalization, standardization of differences as well as contempt for so called “lesser cultures.” Thanks to a very clear expression and a convincing, “straight-to-the-point” line of argument, his essay constitutes a stimulating tool inspiring in-depth reflection and is widely studied in high schools and universities.

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Indian way of life and vision of the world, life in the reductions and a response to the critics . This last article is a transcript and French translation of the last seven chapters (6 to 12) of Book 3 of the Latin manuscript by the Jesuit F. X. Eder on the missions or reductions in the Amerindian nations of the Moxos and Baures. It is the continuation of the first eight articles on the Jesuit missions in the now Bolivian Amazon basin in the 18th century , entitled:

  1. 1. Lima, Peru, and their inhabitants in the 18th century.
  2. 2. Jesuit missions in the now Bolivian Amazon basin in the 18th century.
  3. 3. Quality of the soil and description of the Indians.
  4. 4. Constructive works, beliefs and superstitions of the Indians, and how to convince them to join a reduction.
  5. 5. Trees, fruits, plants and mammals.
  6. 6. Birds, hunting, crocodiles, dolphins, fishes and fishing.
  7. 7 Fauna (last part), poisons and antidote, arms used by Indians for hunting and fishing.
  8. 8. Choice of a spouse, feasts and games, meals, food and drink, handicraft and arts.

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