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the quality of raw and cooked chicken meat patties . IV. International Multidisciplinary Congress of Eurasia ; Rome , 2017 August . K urt , S. & K ilincceker , O. ( 2012

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): Effect of the composition of commercial feed mixture on total lipid, cholesterol and fatty acids content in broiler chicken meat. Czech. J. Anim. Sci. , 44 , 179-185. Effect of the composition of commercial feed mixture on

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: K.N. Hussein, L. Friedrich, R. Pinter, Cs. Németh, G. Kiskó, and I. Dalmadi

This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of bioactive compounds (BACs): linalool (LIN) and piperine (PIP) on chicken meat characteristics. The meat was treated with 500, 1000 ppm of BACs, vacuum packaged and stored at 4 °C for 8 days. Physicochemical characteristics, lipid oxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS), microbiological status, and sensorial (electronic-nose based) properties were investigated. Both BACs significantly increased the redness (a*) and chroma (C*) values in meat compared to increased lightness (L*) and higher TBARS in control. Although both BACs showed overlapping aroma profile, the E-nose was able to distinguish between the different meat groups. LIN with various dilution ratios, particularly 1:10 (v:v), showed in vitro growth inhibition against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Bacillus cereus, concomitantly Listeria monocytogenes required 1:80 (v:v) to be inhibited, and no inhibition was detected for Pseudomonas lundensis. In contrast, PIP at different dilutions did not exhibit inhibitory activity. Regarding aerobic mesophilic counts (AMC), less than 7 log CFU g−1 were recorded except for control showing higher log. Both BACs have potential to improve quality characteristics and increase the shelf life of meat and meat products.

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-Vega , W.R. , Fonseca , G.G. , Feisther , V.A. , Silva , T.F. & Prentice , C. ( 2013 ): Evaluation of frankfurters obtained from croaker (Micropogonias furnieri) surimi and mechanically deboned chicken meat surimi-like material . CyTA –J. Food

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The microbiological spoilage of foods depends on the initial microbiological contamination and some factors which influence the growth of microorganisms. Therefore, reducing the initial cell count is necessary for both extending shelf-life and improving food safety. Physical, chemical and combined treatments serve this purpose. In these experiments, the effect of trisodium phosphate dipping (0-15% solutions) was studied. Chicken wings were used, which after dipping (1 min) in the solution were packed in PE-PA-PE pouches and stored at 4 °C. Aerobic mesophilic (Nutrient Agar, Merck), pseudomonad (Pseudomonas Selective Agar, Oxoid), and Enterobacteriaceae counts (VRBD Agar, Merck) were determined by Spiral Plate Technique at 30 °C incubation temperature. Effect of 3.8, 5.7, 7.6% trisodium phosphate dipping solutions was studied as a function of storage time. Immediately after treatment, total colony count was reduced by maximum 1.5 log cycles. Pseudomonads were the most sensitive. One day after treatment with these low concentration solutions, the colony count was reduced by 2 log cycles. Na3PO4concentration higherthan 7.6% practically did not result in higher effectivity. The growth rate and maximum cell count of surviving fraction were estimated as a function of trisodium phosphate concentration. It can be concluded from fitted survival curves that immediately after treatment the initial viable cell count was reduced and the critical spoilage level (107g-1) has been reached 2-3 days later than in case of the untreated samples, i.e. the shelf-life was extended.

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. Ntzimani , A. , Giatrakou , V. & Savvaidis , I. 2010 : Combined natural antimicrobial treatments (edta, lysozyme, rosemary and oregano oil) on semi cooked coated chicken meat stored in vacuum packages at 4 °C

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The effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) and nisin was studied on micro-organisms in minced chicken and beef meat. Pressure in the range of 0-800 MPa and nisin (670 IU g-1) were applied for vacuum packed minced meat. In chicken meat the total viable cell count decreased by 3 log cycles as an effect of HHP at 300 MPa and by 5 log cycles in combination with nisin. The D value is 35-39 MPa for pseudomonads in minced chicken meat. In case of inoculation with L. monocytogenes, the cell count in beef meat was reduced only by pressure higher than 200 MPa (“shoulder”) with a characteristic value of D=37-38 MPa. B. cereus spores, both dormant and heat activated, were very resistant (D=800 MPa) in beef. However, the survival of pressurised spores after chilled storage (for two weeks at 4 °C) was smaller for non-heat activated spores than for heat activated spores. Efficiency of HHP combined with nisin needs further research work.

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Psychrotrophic Pseudomonas species P. fluorescens, P. fragi and P. lundensis were found as predominant bacteria of chicken meat stored at chill temperature, which showed high level of molecular diversity, while isolates of the psychrotrophic yeasts Candida zeylanoides, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Rhodotorula glutinis and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa formed clusters of high level similarity within the different species as revealed by RAPD-PCR analysis.Combination of multiplex PCR and sequencing of the rpoB gene resulted correct identification of the Pseudomas isolates, while the routine diagnostic tests led to improper identification in case of half of the isolates, which indicated the extended biochemical and physiological heterogeneity of the food-borne pseudomonads. Majority of P. fluorescens and P. lundensis isolates were strong protease and lipase producers, while P. fragi strains were week or negative from this respect. Proteolytic and lipolytic activities of the isolated yeast strains were species specific and protease production was less frequent than lipolytic activities.

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: L. Darnay, A. Dankovics, B. Molnár, L. Friedrich, Gy. Kenesei, and Cs. Balla

886 895 Pikul , J., Leszczynski , D E. & Kummerow , F.A. (1989): Evaluation of three modified TBA methods for measuring lipid oxidation in chicken meat. J. Agr

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material on yield and composition of mechanically separated chicken meat.) Coletânea do ITAL , 19 , 196–200. Silva R.Z. Efeito das condiçoes de processamento e tipo de matéria

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