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Metamorphosis and Disruption

Comments on Seneca's 114th Epistula Moralis

Acta Antiqua Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Author: László Takács

Seneca, in the 114th piece of his Moral letters (written most probably in the fall of 64 A.D.), evokes a part of Virgil's Georgics, which he already quoted and construed more than 10 years earlier in De clementia, addressed to Nero. At the same time, he lashes out on Maecenas. Since Seneca mentions such characteristics of Maecenas that, according to historical sources, resemble some of Nero's actions, and since he evokes a fragment already analyzed for Nero, it seems very likely that the letter should be viewed as the philosopher-statesman's critique of Nero.

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The Celâlî rebel armies ravaged the central Anatolian countryside from the late 16th up to the mid-17th century. The Celâlî movements brought about demographic changes and had a long-lasting impact on agricultural economy in some regions. Anatolian waqf institutions being dependent on rural taxpayers and agricultural production for their budgets were seriously harmed by the Celâlî rebellions. This paper examines the Celâlî effect through the Waqf of Hatuniyye which had villages scattered across central Anatolian districts. The waqf fell into a deep financial crisis and its regular functioning was disrupted in the early 17th century. The waqf finance was unable to recover for decades after the crisis, which indicates that rural economy in waqf villages suffered from a perpetual production and population crisis.

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Abstract

The present paper examines the relationship between incantations and belief narratives, two types of oral genres based on human contact with the supernatural. Such contact attests to a dangerous disruption of the boundary between the human and demonic worlds and to the intensive efforts to reinforce it so that participants may return to the space they belong in. For this purpose, various verbal and nonverbal tools are used in belief narratives (gestures, objects, plants, sound or light signals, certain activities – such as walking backwards, placing a cap over the forehead, etc.). In contrast, incantations, an inseparable part of vernacular magical practices, rely solely on verbal communication with impure forces.

This paper will analyse the following aspects of interconnection between these oral genres: 1) the display of a genre within a genre – the presence of incantations in belief narratives, e.g., about dispersing hailstorm clouds; 2) the types of verbal communication with the supernatural in belief narratives (swearing, cursing, command, reproach) and their equivalents in incantations; 3) various motifs of protection from demons (counting the uncountable, using bodily fluids; thorn, fire, metal, broom, etc.). The consideration of shared elements in these genres that preserve the relationship with the mythological narrative include elements of the ceremonial context in which incantations are performed. I argue that some of these elements appear also in belief narratives, where they undergo a transformation.

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This article explores the history of Belső-Erzsébetváros, the Inner 7th District of Budapest, an urban area regarded as a historic Jewish quarter in today’s discourse. The historical summary focuses on societal transformations caused by political changes and historical tragedies during the 20th century. One explicit goal is to show in which ways the Inner 7th District of Budapest is unique among similar historic districts of other Central European cities: in Central European comparison, a large proportion of its population — just like the Jewish population of Budapest in general — survived the Holocaust. Therefore Jewish heritage has been experienced differently there than elsewhere in cities of the region.

After briefly introducing the historical evolution of the Inner 7th District before World War II, the article portrays local society, and explores the social relations that characterized this area until the last years of the World War II. Patterns of ethnic and confessional intermixing will be interpreted as defining characteristics of the district in the interwar period. Then the author will show the way wartime events and political measures disrupted the social fabric of the neighborhood, and transformed the local population dramatically by the spring of 1945. At the same time, patterns of survival will be also emphasized. After discussing the impact of World War II and the Holocaust, the article will highlight the post-1945 shifts in local society, exploring the impact of migration as well as the connection between societal transformation and the area’s physical decay in the Communist period. Finally, the author will briefly touch upon the past 25 years, discussing the possibilities of revival in the area, pointing out the role of Jewish heritage in the recent rediscovery of the neighborhood.

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deformed; b) its form is either extremely irregular, or extremely disrupted, fragmented, regardless of the scale of examination; c) it contains “distinctive elements” whose scales are very varied and cover a very wide range.” 31 After 1968: Hungarian

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Attempts at creating a new concept of literature •

(The Hungarian literature in Slovakia between the two world wars)

Hungarian Studies
Author: Zsófia Bárczi

possibility of the existence of Hungarian literature in Slovakia can also be felt from the outset. The area's separation from the general Hungarian literary life and the import ban on books led to a disruption of the centrum-peripheral model effective before

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Attempts at creating a new concept of literature •

(The Hungarian literature in Slovakia between the two world wars)

Hungarian Studies
Author: Zsófia Bárczi

possibility of the existence of Hungarian literature in Slovakia can also be felt from the outset. The area's separation from the general Hungarian literary life and the import ban on books led to a disruption of the centrum-peripheral model effective before

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juncture SPs that occur at the end of a clause or utterance (Boomer and Dittmann 1962). There are fluent SPs that do not perceptually disrupt the smooth flow of speech (Ruder and Jensen 1972) and hesitation SPs (Boomer and Dittmann 1962; Hieke 1981) that do

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shortening was disrupted in WOT, and the long vowels were retained, or a process of diphthongization started. During the diphthongization of the illabial long vowels ( ā, ī, ē ), the i̭ -glide appeared first, which turned into consonant y - in the initial

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in a Disrupted Europe 1914–1938 . London : Sidgwick and Jackson . 10.2307/j.ctt1w6tfz4 Orosz László , 1999 . A cenzor figyelme. A Bánk Bán értelmezéseinek a története . Budapest : Krónika Nova . Paget , John , 1839 , Hungary and Transylvania

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