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Thirty-three varieties of dairy products were analysed for fat and cholesterol contents, and a high correlation (r=0.983) was found between these two compositional attributes. Cholesterol concentration was independent of processing factors such as heat-treatment of the raw material, use of starter culture, type of the starter organisms employed and whipping or flavouring of the product. The non-fat varieties of fluid, fermented and dried milks showed significantly increased cholesterol-to-fat ratios compared to the other products tested because they contained considerable amounts of small fat globules and, therefore, had a large surface area with cholesterol bound to the fat globule membranes. The results of this study may be useful when establishing dietary guidelines for the general public according to health concerns, when formulating diets for population groups with special requirements or when assessing fat and cholesterol intakes in epidemiological studies aimed at investigating the relationship between diet and health.

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Studies performed so far on different human carcinoma cell lines, as well as numerous case-control and epidemiological studies have given proof to the protective effects of selenium against cancer. However, the anticancer properties of selenium are site-specific. The aim of this work was to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of selenium against CaCo2 human colon carcinoma cells, and SW620 lymph node metastasis of colon carcinoma cell line. Three selenium compounds, seleno-DL-cystine (SeC), seleno-L-methionine (SeM) and sodium selenite were used. Initial number of cells was 210 4 and the cells were incubated for 72 h with the aforementioned Se compounds at 10, 100 and 1000 µmol Se concentrations. Cytotoxicity was measured by the MTT cell survival assay. In the present study, decreased viabilities of both CaCo2 and SW620 cells were established following the treatment with selenite, SeC, and SeM. At 10 µmol Se levels all three chemical forms exerted a more or less anticipated cytotoxic effect with viability decreases ranging from 22 to 37%. However, the other two levels of 100 and 1000 µmol Se did not exhibit an expected proportional rise in cytotoxic effect compared to 10 µmol, which warrants further research on the reasons for increased resistance of these cells. Cell morphology also indicates that investigated Se forms induced apoptotic cell death in both cell lines. The results confirm the applicability of Se in the prevention and treatment of the investigated cancer sites.

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: K. Delonga, I. Radojčić Redovniković, V. Dragović-Uzelac, V. Mrkić, and J. Vorkapić-Furač

The interest in food with chemoprotective properties has been steadily increasing due to many epidemiological studies indicating the lower probability of acquiring some kinds of cancer (e.g. colon, prostate, breast, cervical) in populations, whose diet includes large quantities of Brassica vegetables. The biologically active compounds in Brassica vegetables are the breakdown products of glucosinolates, including isothiocyanates, nitriles, thiocyanates, indoles and oxazolidinethiones from which indoles and isothiocyanates in particular have been implicated to have anticarcinogenic properties. The object of the present study was to investigate glucosinolates distribution as well as their losses during blanching and cooking in edible parts of white cabbage, cauliflower, kohlrabi and collard. In all vegetable, only indole glucosinolates as precursors of anticarcinogenic compounds were identified, while glucoraphane was not detected. In cauliflower and collard, proportion of indole glucosinolates was more then 90%, followed by kohlrabi (>70%) and white cabbage (>50%). Analysis of glucosinolates losses during blanching and cooking showed substantial decrease in all vegetables. The major losses were observed for cauliflower, around 60%, for cooked vegetable, followed by white cabbage (55%), kohlrabi (53%) and collard (44%). The losses after blanching were approximately 15% less then in cooked vegetables.

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accurate for use in large epidemiological studies?. Nutr. J. , 7 , 26. Merchant A. Is bioelectrical impedance accurate for use in large epidemiological studies

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: V. Mrkic, I. Redovnikovic, S. Jolic, K. Delonga, and V. Dragovic-Uzelac

Arts, I.C.W. & Hollman, P.C.H. (2005): Polyphenols and disease risk in epidemiologic studies, (1, Dietary polyphenols and health). Am. J. clin. Nutr. , 81 , 317S–325S

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: V. Tomović, B. Žlender, M. Jokanović, M. Tomović, B. Šojić, S. Škaljac, Ž. Kevrešan, T. Tasić, P. Ikonić, and Đ. Okanović

. Available at: http://dad.fao.org/. EUROPEAN INSTITUTE OF ONCOLOGY ( 2008 ): Food composition database for epidemiological studies in Italy . Available at: http://www.ieo.it/bda2008/homepage

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: I. Rumora, I. Kobrehel Pintarić, J. Gajdoš Kljusurić, O. Marić, and D. Karlović

Peré-Trepat, E., Ross, A.B., Martin, F.-B., Rezzi, S., Kochhar, S., Hasselbalch, A.L., Kyvik, K.O. & Sørensen, T.I.A. (2010): Chemometric strategies to assess metabonomic imprinting of food habits in epidemiological studies. Chemometr. Intell. Lab

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epidemiological studies are needed. Med. Hypotheses , 62 , 280–290. Block G. Relationship between dietary antioxidants and childhood asthma: more epidemiological studies are needed

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tavric , B. , K lassen , R. , W atkinson , B. , K arpinski , K. , S tapley , R. & F ried , P. ( 1988 ): Variability in caffeine consumption from coffee and tea: possible significance for epidemiological studies . Food Chem. Toxicol. , 26

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): National, regional, and global trends in body-mass index since 1980: systematic analysis of health examination surveys and epidemiological studies with 960 country-years and 9.1 million participants. Lancet, 377 , 557

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