Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 34 items for :

  • Architecture and Architectonics x
  • All content x
Clear All
Acta Alimentaria
Authors: T. Ábel, A. Blázovics, A. Wimmer, G. Bekő, B. Gaál, B. Blazics, M. Eldin, J. Fehér, I. Szabolcs, and G. Lengyel

Ábel, T. & Fehér, J. (2009): Effect of moderate alcohol consumption on insulin sensitivity. Hung. Med. J. , 150 , 2218–2221. Fehér J

Restricted access

supplementation in the plasma glucose level and insulin activity in genetically obese (ob/ob) mice. Biol. Trace Element Res. , 61 , 303-311. Effects of zinc supplementation in the plasma glucose level and insulin activity in genetically

Restricted access

-glucosidase, which restricts intestinal glucose absorption ( Hou et al., 2009 ), and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, which is a key factor in the negative regulation of the insulin pathway and a promising target for the treatment of DM and obesity ( Zhang et al

Restricted access

insulin following an oral glucose load. Brit. J. Nutr. , 72 , 731-743. Effect of dose and modification of viscous properties of oat gum on plasma glucose and insulin following an oral glucose load

Restricted access

prepared in different concentrations, 50, 100, 250, 500, 750, and 1000 μg ml –1 , with 5 μg ml –1 rosiglitazone, a commonly used hypoglycaemic drug, as a positive control for treatment of cells for 24 h (no insulin treatment and insulin treatment). Glucose

Restricted access

Carpertier, J. L., Gorden, P. & Lew, D. P. (1992): Calcium ions are required for the intracellular routing of insulin and its receptor. Exp. Cell Res. , 198 , 144-149. Calcium ions are required for the intracellular routing of

Restricted access
Acta Alimentaria
Authors: I. Cioffi, L. Santarpia, A. Vaccaro, M. Naccarato, R. Iacone, M. Marra, F. Contaldo, and F. Pasanisi

The interest in gluten-free (GF) diet has greatly increased also in people without celiac disease (CD). This pilot study aimed to investigate the postprandial effect of GF-pasta, made by using the pasta-making process applied to artisan wheat pasta, on palatability, appetite sensation, and glucose metabolism in 8 healthy volunteers. Two iso-caloric lunch-meals consisting of: 1) gluten-free pasta (GFP) and 2) refined wheat pasta (RP) were compared in cross-over design. Both subjective appetite, assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS), and blood sample were taken before meal and at half-hour intervals for 4 hours. Palatability was evaluated immediately after the meal-test by VAS. All participants underwent pre- and postprandial energy expenditure (EE) measured by indirect calorimetry. We found that subjective palatability did not significantly differ between meals. Similarly, repeated measures ANOVA showed that GFP did not affect appetite ratings, postprandial glucose, and insulin responses compared to RP. Then, postprandial EE was affected by time (P=0.006), increasing at 60 min, but not by meals. In conclusion, artisanal GFP was as palatable as RP pasta, without affecting perceived satiety and postprandial glycaemia compared to RP in healthy subjects. Clearly, GFP results are preliminary and need to be investigated in larger studies.

Open access

We examined the hypothesis that rye bread enriched with green tea extract (GTE) (at two different doses) can prevent obesity as a component of a hypercaloric diet by decreasing the absorption of energy providing nutrients and regulating lipid metabolism-related hormones, in comparison with normal caloric diet used in the Wistar rats. Adult male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: group ND received a normal caloric diet, group HRB received a hypercaloric diet with control rye bread, groups HRB0.8% and HRB1.1% received a hypercaloric diet with rye bread enriched with 0.8% and 1.1% GTE, respectively. Higher food intake in the ND group compared with the other groups of rats was noted; however, there was no statistical difference in the energy intake among any of the groups. Consumption of the hypercaloric diet increased the body weight of the rats (in comparison with ND), but rats from HRB1.1% group showed a tendency towards smaller gains in body weight (∼4.0%) when compared to the HRB group. The addition of 1.1% GTE to rye bread resulted in an increase in the energy content of faeces, compared to both HRB and ND groups. No differences were observed in plasma leptin concentrations between the four groups. The insulin level in rats fed a hypercaloric diet was higher in comparison to rats from the ND group. The consumption of rye bread enriched with 1.1% GTE may increase faeces energy excretion, but without significantly suppressing body weight gain, visceral fat accumulation, or changing biochemical parameters related to lipid metabolism.

Restricted access

Morishita M., Goto T., Takayama K., Peppas N. A. Oral insulin delivery systems based on complexation polymer hydrogels, J. Drug Deliv. Sci. Techn. Vol. 16, 2006, pp. 19–24. Peppas N. A

Restricted access

.C., Regazzi, R., Deeney, J.T. & Corkey, B.E. (1992): Malonyl-CoA and long chain acyl-CoA esters as metabolic coupling factors in nutrient-induced insulin secretion. J. Biol. Chem. , 267 , 5802–5810. Corkey B

Restricted access