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Most Hungarian cartoons were meant for the whole family rather than just children. Due to this fact, everyone could enjoy the stories, the little ones loved the animal characters, which were often in the center, and the adults could laugh at the ironic and caricaturistic situations and representations. In my research I analyze the hidden meanings of a classic Hungarian cartoon entitled Cat City, brought up through intertextuality, allegory, irony and other rhetorical devices that might communicate an underlying meaning. I also examine the kinds of television tropes and archetypical characters that are likely to appear in the cartoon. The cartoon’s main situation is the fight between cats and mice, and it is a parody of several famous feature films, focusing mainly on the James Bond series. The main plot is about a special spy who is sent to the city of “Pokyo” to get the secret plan for a machine which could save the mouse civilization. These underlying meanings greatly added to the Hungarian cartoon’s popularity, which sometimes represented the symbols and even flaws of the communist system.

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Among: J. M. Coetzee’s The Master of Petersburg and the Place of Intertextuality . In: Grishakova Marina , Lehtimäki Marku (ed.): Intertextuality and Intersemiosis . Tartu : Tartu University Press , 2004 . 10 – 30

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Literary Terms 1993 Allen, G. 2000. Intertextuality . New York and London: Routledge. Allen G

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Any text can be regarded as a semiotic unity composed of an intervowen net of signs which interacts with other previous texts. It is believed that translators should bear in mind, first, the inter-semiotic interactions within the text, i.e., the intratextual set of relationships, to come out with a consistent, coherent target text, and, second, the inter-semiotic interaction across the text, i.e., the intertextual set of relationships, which allows readers to perceive certain suitable intertextual links. This paper aims to analyse the intra- and intertextual network of relationships of a literary text from a contrastive point of view, comparing Henry James's original Daisy Miller and two of its current translations into Spanish. It will be argued that had the Spanish translators taken into consideration the intratextual set of relationships of the source text at the time of producing a target text, some inconsistencies could have been prevented and a more cohesive, coherent and appealing text would have ensued. It will also be argued that the translators of this nineteenth-century piece of work should allow target readers to perceive certain intertextual links between their target texts and other texts written in Spanish at the time and other translated texts of works originally written in that century in order for target readers to get an equivalent effect to that perceived by current source readers and to render a faithful image of the writer.

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Antike und Christentum

Zur Überlagerung intertextueller Bezugnahmen in Heinrich Bölls Kurzgeschichte „Wanderer, kommst du nach Spa...“

Studia Slavica
Author: Magdolna Orosz

Textanalyse, 28f. Zur Darstellung einer semiotischen Auffassung von Intertextualität vgl. Magdolna Orosz , Intertextuality and Meaning Construction in Literary Texts. A Semiotic Analysis. In: Irmengard Rauch/Gerald F. Carr (eds

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. O’Connor 1989 = O’Connor Katherine Tiernan: Elena, Helen of Troy, and the Eternal Feminine: Epigraphs and Intertextuality in Sestra moya zhizn’ . In: Boris Pasternak and His Times. Selected Papers from the Second International Symposium on

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In this paper I argue that the subtext for Ovid's positive portrayal of Diomedes at Rem. 151-167 is the Vergilian episode of Diomedes' reply to the embassy of the Latins (Aen. 11.252-93), and that the adjustment of this episode to the frame of Ovid's erotic didactic is achieved through a number of similarities in diction and theme. Ovid's treatment of the Vergilian Diomedes, however, is subversive and the Vergilian narrative is being undermined and reworked in a brand new way.

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Abstract  

Ezra Pound's Canto I (1917), and the Hungarian Lőrinc Szabs first volume of poetry, Fld, Erdő, Isten (Earth, Forest, God — poems published between 1920 and 1921) seem to represent the same kind of discourse. Both poets employed classicist filters to induce modern sensibility and anxiety. Their poems are quasi narratives or scenes from ancient literature. Between 1917 and 1921 their response was similar to the same aspects of the past and to its textually and philologically relatable remains so that one particular citation allows manifold interpretation. There appears a borderline, a difference between the intertextual techniques of classical modernity and those of the second phase of modernity. The poets of classical modernity (Browning, Verlaine or the Hungarian Mihly Babits) built up a fictive world to provide the scenery of the poem. The construction, the composition, the designable whole gained emphasis as an integral part of the work. The texts cited by Pound or Szab are not integrated in the composition, they are left to appear as alien elements to demonstrate unidentifiability. They prove that no text can be a definite part of the composition because they all imply diverse and at times contradictory interpretations in different eras. This kind of intertextualization of classical materials differs not only from the method of classicization of the earlier, classical modernity, but also from the fashionable neo-classicism of the 1930s. In classical modernity and neo-classicism loan-texts emphasize the shaped character of classical culture. While classical modernity valued aspects of composition, neo-classicism aimed at mimicry of tone, rhetorical and poetic forms. In contrast, the second phase of modernity valued intertextuality in itself, free from all formal and logical restrictions.

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It has already been discussed in Statian scholarship that Achilles’ first song in the Achilleid has close intertextual ties to Catullus’ Carmen 64, the epyllion about the wedding of Achilles’ parents. My aim in this paper is to show that this special intertextual relationship with Catullus 64 is not confined to Achilles’ first song, but extends to the other two passages as well, where the hero is presented as a singer (1. 572–583 and 2. 157–158). In all three cases, furthermore, the intertextual connection is strengthened by the use of weaving metaphors, which were also of central importance in Catullus’ epyllion.

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The article deals with the role of the Greek goddess Hera and her Roman counterpart, Iuno, in the poetic treatments of the myth of Argonauts. The focus is put especially on Iuno’s character development in Valerius Flaccus’ adaptation of the myth. Iuno’s character in this work has already been discussed by Werner Schubert in his fundamental study (1991), in which he pointed out the remarkable approximation of Iuno fabulosa and Iuno civilis. Referring to this study, the article emphasizes rather the literary development of Iuno’s character. It is shown that Valerius Flaccus portrays the highest goddess not only as a peculiar helper (socia), as suggested by Schubert, but also as a permanent participant in an intertextual dialogue with the epic poems of Homer and Apollonius Rhodius. Valerius Flaccus’ aim here is to invert his literary predecessors’ accounts in a subtle and witted way (as Debra Hershkowitz has already presented).

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