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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: N. Parunović, M. Petrović, V. Matekalo-Sverak, D. Radojković, D. Vranić, and Č. Radović

757 761 Cameron, N.D., Warriss, P.D., Porter, S.J. & Enser, M.B. (1990): Comparison of Duroc and British Landrace pigs for meat and eating quality. Meat Sci

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.E., Ambrose, M.& Reader, S.M. (2001): The Watkins collection of land-race derived wheats. -in: Caligari, P.D.S. & Brandham, P.E. (Eds) Wheat Taxonomy: the Legacy of John Percival . The Linnean Special Issue, No. 3. Academic Press, pp. 113

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: R. Božac, I. Kos, Z. Janječić, Ž. Kuzmanović, M. Konjačić, and J. Nežak

An investigation has been carried out on the effect of different crossbreeds on chemical and sensory profiling of Croatian representative pork products, Istrian hams. Due to the original trimming of hams (without skin and subcutaneous adipose tissue) the total weight loss was significantly higher (41.67–43.69%) in all three genotypes (Swedish Landrace×Dutch Large Whit ×Pietrain (SL×DLW×P), Dutch Large White×Swedish Landrace (DLW×SL) and Dutch Large White×Duroc (DLW×D)) in comparison with the Italian and Spanish hams with skin and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Hams from DLW×D genotype had a significantly lower (P<0.01) total weight loss (41.67%) and, in comparison with the Spanish and Italian hams, Istrian ham contains much less moisture (45.05–46.35%). The content of total saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated fatty acids and cholesterol was similar in all crossbreeds (P>0.05). The cholesterol level is low (541.9–555.9 mg kg−1), which makes Istrian dry-cured ham a dietary product. Hams from DLW×D had significantly more visible intramuscular fat (P<0.01) than hams from SL×DLW×P crossbreeds. The colour of muscle tissue, seasoned flavour, taste, saltiness, total mouth consistency (tender, melting, stringy) and tactile consistency were best in genotype DLW×D.

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: A. Lugasi, K. Neszlényi, J. Hóvári, K. V. Lebovics, A. Hermán, T. Ács, J. Gundel, and I. Bodó

Fat content and fatty acid composition were investigated in Musculus gluteus medius of pigs from two different breeds: traditional Hungarian Mangalica and a crossbreed of Hungarian Large White and Dutch Landrace. Animals of both varieties were divided into two groups and were kept individually on control or experimental mixtures of feeds. Experimental feed contained significantly higher amount of linoleic and linolenic acid than the control one. Significantly higher fat content was detected in meat of Mangalica pigs kept on both feed mixtures than in those of crossbred. The proportion of saturated fatty acids was nearly the same in the meat of both genotypes. More monounsaturated fatty acids were detected in Mangalica meat than in crossbred ones expressed in percent of total fatty acids and absolute amount, as well. As a result of experimental diet, percentage and absolute amount of oleic acid decreased significantly in both genotypes. Less polyunsaturated fatty acids expressed as percent of total acids were observed in the muscle of Mangalica than in those of crossbred ones. Absolute amount and the proportion of total polyunsaturated fatty acids (especially linoleic and linolenic acids) increased significantly as a result experimental diets. The ratio of n-6 and n-3 fatty acids changed beneficially in both genotypes consuming a diet containing 20% full-fat soy from 13.6:1 to 10.0:1 in Mangalica and from 15.4:1 to 10.3:1 in crossbred genotype. According to present results, it has became clear that the fatty acid composition of the meat of the traditional Hungarian Mangalica can be successfully modified by the diet, and this manipulation can make the meat healthier in spite of its high fat content.

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: B. Csehi, E. Szerdahelyi, K. Pásztor-Huszár, B. Salamon, A. Tóth, I. Zeke, G. Jónás, and L. Friedrich

. , RADOJKOVIC , D. , VRANIC , D. , RADOVIC , C. ( 2012 ): Cholesterol and total fatty acid content in m . longissimus dorsi of mangalitsa and Swedish landrace. Acta Alimentaria , 41 , 161 – 171

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: G. Gulyás, L. Czeglédi, B. Béri, S. Harangi, E. Csősz, Z. Szabó, T. Janáky, and A. Jávor

Hollung, K., Grove, H., Færgestad, E.M., Sidhu, M.S. & Berg, P. (2009): Comparison of muscle proteome profiles in pure breeds of Norwegian Landrace and Duroc at three different ages. Meat Sci. , 81 , 487

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: L. Hernández Rodríguez, D. Afonso Morales, E.M. Rodríguez-Rodríguez, and C. Díaz Romero

. ( 2011 ): Minerals and trace elements in a collection of wheat landraces from the Canary Islands . J. Food Compos. Anal. , 24 , 1081 – 1090 . Hovenkamp

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-magyarországi meggy tájfajta szelekció eredményei és gazdasági jelentosége (Results and economic importance of the North Eastern Hungarian sour cherry landrace cultivar selection). Dissertation, Corvinus University of Budapest, p. 46

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between Italian landraces and commercial varieties . Agriculture , 9 , 253 , 1 - 14 . 10.3390/agriculture9120253 Deiana , M. , Rosa , A. , Cao , C.F. , Pirisi , F.M. , Bandino , G. & Dessiå , M.A. ( 2002 ): Novel approach to study

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