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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: V. Kovacevic, D. Banaj, J. Kovacevic, A. Lalic, Z. Jurkovic, and M. Krizmanic

Antunovic M., Kovacevic V., Banaj D. (2002): Influences of liming on field crops yields on pseudoglay soils. In: Proceedings of the Union of Scientists-Rousse “Energy Efficiency and Agricultural Engineering, Vol

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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: Života Jovanovic, Ivica Djalovic, Ilija Komljenovic, Vlado Kovacevic, and Milica Cvijović

radova, Paraćin, 114–125. Kovacevic V., Bertic B., Grgic D. (1993): Response of maize, barley, wheat and soybean to liming on acid soils. Rostlinna Vyroba 39(1) 41–52. Grgic

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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: Josip Kovacevic, Alojzije Lalic, Vlado Kovacevic, and Djuro Banaj

Antrunovic M., Kovacevic V., Bukvic G. (2001): Influence of liming on maize under drought stress. In: Fertilization in the third millennium — fertilizer, food security and environmental protection” (Lanzhu J

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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: Svetislav Popovic, Marijana Tucak, and Zrinka Knezovic

Antunovic M. — Kovacevic V. — Banaj D.: 2002. Influences of liming on field crops yields on pseudoglay soils-In: Proceedings of the Union of Scientists-Rousse “Energy Efficiency and Agricultural Engineering, Vol

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The natural climate variability may be masked by the anthropogenic made global warming, today. With a warmer climate, drought and excess rainfall conditions could become more frequent and longer lasting. The potential increase of the hazards result stresses and high costs in cereal production. For this reason a long-term study was conducted on a sandy acidic lessivated brown forest soil; WRB: Haplic Luvisol in the 44 year old Nyírlugos Field Trial (NYFT) in a Hungarian fragile agroecosystem in Nyírség region (N: 470 41’ 60, and E: 220 2’ 80,) on triticale (× Triticosecale Wittm.) yield between 1999 and 2006. In 1962, at the trial set up the soil had the following agrochemical properties: pH (H 2 O) 5.9, pH (KCl) 4.7, hydrolytic acidity 8.4, hyl 0.3, humus 0.7%, total N 34 mg kg −1 , ammonlactate (AL) soluble-P 2 O 5 43 mg kg −1 , AL-K 2 O 60 mg kg −1 in the plowed (0–25 cm) layer. The trial consisted of 32 × 4 = 128 plots in randomised block design. The gross plot size was 10 × 5 = 50 m 2 . The average fertilizer rates in kg ha −1 year −1 were nitrogen 75, phosphorus 90 (P 2 O 5 ), potassium 90 (K 2 O), calcium 437.5 (CaCO 3 ) and magnesium 140 (MgCO 3 ). The groundwater table had at a depth of 2–3 m below the surface. During drought conditions the respective yield of the control areas was −25% less than for average years. The application N alone or NP and NK treatments led to yield reduction of −19.7%, while that of NPK, NPKCa, NPKMg and NPKCaMg caused an −28.3% yield drop. In the wet years the yield decreased by −22.2% on the unfertilized soils; in case of the N, NP and NK nutrition the yield dropped with an −14.1%; and the yield increased at 13.8% on NPK, NPKCa, NPKMg and NPKCaMg treated plots. Yield dropped in the very wettest year −43.1% on control soils; −39.3% of N, NP and NK loadings, and −35.8% on NPK, NPKCa, NPKMg and NPKCaMg treatments to those in the average year. The relationship between rainfall quantity during the vegetation period and N, P, K, Ca, Mg nutrition and yield was characterised by polynomial correlation (control: R = 0.7212***, N: R = 0.7410***, NP: R = 0.6452***, NK: R = 0.6998***, NPK: R = 0.5555***, NPKCa: R = 0.5578***, NPKMg: R = 0.4869**, NPK CaMg: R = 0.4341**). However, total regression coefficients ranged from 0.43 to 0.74 in depence on the different nutrient application. Maximum yields of 5.8–6.0 t ha −1 were achieve in the rainfall range of 580–620 mm. At values above and below this domain of the precipitation the grain yield reduced quadratically. So, it can be stated that both drought and excess rainfall conditions resulted dramatically significant negative effects between fertilization (N, P, K, Ca, Mg) and triticale yield.

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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: Zdenko Lončarić, Brigita Popović, Krunoslav Karalić, Domagoj Rastija, and Meri Engler

Bowszys T. — Ruszkowski K. — Bobrzecka D. — Wierzbowska J.: 2005. The effects of liming and complete fertilizers application on soil pH and content of some heavy metals in soil — Journal of Elementology vol. 10

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Loncaric Z. — Rastija D. — Karalic K. — Popovic B.: 2006b. Mineral fertilization and liming impact on maize and wheat yield — Cereal Research Communication vol. 34 no. 1 717–720 pp. Popovic B

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–148. Kamprath E.J. — Foy C.D. (1971): Lime-fertilizer-plant interactions in acid soils. Fertilizer Technology&Use, 2nd Edit., Soil Sci. Soc. Amer., Madison, Wisc., Usa, 105–151. Foy C

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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: Zdenko Loncaric, Domagoj Rastija, Krunoslav Karalic, and Brigita Popovic

benefits of liming. The department of Primary Industries and Resources South Australia. Lakanen E., Ervio R. (1971): A comparison of eight extractans for the determination of plant available micronutrients in soils

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Kovačević V. — Bertić B. — Grgaić D.: 1993. Response of maize, barley, wheat and soybean to liming on acid soils — Rastlinna Vyroba vol. 39 no. 1 41–52 pp. Grgaić D

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