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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Katrin Starcke, Berenike Schlereth, Debora Domass, Tobias Schöler, and Matthias Brand

. B. L. Carter S. T. Tiffany 1999 Meta-analysis of cue-reactivity in addiction research Addiction 94

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persons, were analyzed. These reactions were compared between addiction-relevant cues versus control cues. Results indicate that addiction-relevant cues elicited cue-reactivity on a subjective, and also (albeit to a smaller degree) on peripheral

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Shan-Shan Ma, Patrick D. Worhunsky, Jian-song Xu, Sarah W. Yip, Nan Zhou, Jin-Tao Zhang, Lu Liu, Ling-Jiao Wang, Ben Liu, Yuan-Wei Yao, Sheng Zhang, and Xiao-Yi Fang

& Berridge, 1993 ). Thus, the examination of brain responses to Internet gaming cues among IGD may provide insight into one of the most important mechanisms of motivational and compulsive Internet gaming behavior ( Tiffany & Conklin, 2000 ). Cue-reactivity

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Mike J. Dixon, Jeffrey Gutierrez, Chanel J. Larche, Madison Stange, Candice Graydon, Tyler B. Kruger, and Stephen D. Smith

. In the current experiment, we seek to demonstrate that the arousal associated with reward reactivity and dark flow differentially impacts the enjoyment experienced during slots play. In order to provide empirical evidence for these two routes to

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selective mobilization of T cells that differ in chemokine receptor expression: A potential pathway linking immunologic reactivity to cardiovascular disease . Brain, Behavior and Immunity , 17 , 251 – 259

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Most studies on changes in female behavior and preferences across the menstrual cycle have been conducted in samples comprised of largely white undergraduate students from Western populations. The present study examined cyclical shifts in reactive, preventive and anxious jealousy in a sample of 71 Afro-Caribbean women from Curaçao, a country in the Caribbean. We expected that, because of the risk of conceiving, especially preventive jealousy would be relatively high when fertile to safeguard the male’s protection, provisioning and investment. The results showed that, when fertile, women experienced indeed particularly more preventive jealousy, and also somewhat more anxious jealousy, but not more reactive jealousy, than when non-fertile. In addition, preventive jealousy was higher the later the age of the first menarche. We discuss possible explanations for the functionality of preventive jealousy during the fertile phase of the cycle, and for the functionality of such jealousy among women with a slow life history strategy.

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To help make educational materials and practices inclusive and useful for all learners, this review article provides the history of the universal design for learning (UDL) framework by defining it in its educational context and by showing how it has been adopted in K-12 and higher education institutions across North America. It reframes UDL as a strategy for reaching adult learners on their mobile devices, and radically reflects on how faculty members and course designers can adopt UDL in order to create learning interactions that provide students with more time for study and practice in their busy days. To this end, the author argues that we should broaden our course-access-design focus away from learners with disabilities and toward a larger ease-of-use/general-inclusion framework. Going through this article, we will be able to help our faculty colleagues to incorporate UDL elements into their courses, design/retrofit existing course components using UDL principles, and expand our institution’s use of UDL elements beyond the legally required minimum. This article posits diversity in its most inclusive form: instead of relying solely on providing accommodation services to learners with disabilities – which is most often a last-minute, ad-hoc, reactive process – adopting UDL as part of an institution’s culture of course design, teaching practices, and support services allows all learners to benefit, regardless of their place on the ability spectrum.

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between cybersex addiction and substance use disorder or other behavioral addictions ( Kowalewska et al., 2018; Stark, Klucken, Potenza, Brand, & Strahler, 2018 ). Previous studies have revealed the association between cybersex addiction and cue reactivity

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particularly related to a hyperactive impulsive system. Mechanisms of affective and cognitive biases, incentive sensitization as well as cue-reactivity and craving are considered to be associated with this hyperactivity and reinforce each other within the

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Matthias Brand, Hans-JÜrgen Rumpf, Zsolt Demetrovics, Astrid MÜller, Rudolf Stark, Daniel L. King, Anna E. Goudriaan, Karl Mann, Patrick Trotzke, Naomi A. Fineberg, Samuel R. Chamberlain, Shane W. Kraus, Elisa Wegmann, JoËl Billieux, and Marc N. Potenza

established to varying degrees for substance-use disorders and gambling/gaming disorders (criterion 3). Commonalities noted in prior studies include cue-reactivity and craving accompanied by increased activity in reward-related brain areas, attentional biases

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