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This article presents eighteen glosses and emendations borrowed from Turkic dialects into the Slavonic-Russian Pentateuch edited according to the Hebrew Masoretic Text (in manuscripts from the 15th–16th centuries). The first group of these words — including proper names — has Arabic or Persian origins; they came into East Slavonic with obvious Turkic mediation (Skandryja ‘Alexandria’, Bagadad ‘Baghdad’, Misurʹ ‘Egypt’, Šam ‘Damascus’, Isup ‘Joseph’, sturlabʹ ‘astrolabe’, soltan ‘sultan’, olmas ‘diamond’, ambar ‘ambergris’, and brynec ‘rice’). The second group is proper Turkic: saigak ‘saiga antelope’, ošak ‘donkey’, katyrʹ ‘mule’, kirpič ‘brick’, talmač ‘interpreter’, čalma ‘turban’, and saranča ‘locust’. The author agrees with the hypothesis that this glossing/emendation was made for the East Slavonic Judaizers. Furthermore, the author suggests that there was participation of a group of merchants interested in a new and mysterious knowledge promulgated by learned rabbis.

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The 2009 publication of J. Scott’s epoch-making book, The Art of Not Being Governed. An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast Asia initiated a long-standing debate about the ethnohistory of the Southeast-Asian Highlands (“Zomia”) and, more generally, about lowland-highland relationships, “nativeness”, state evasion, self-government, and “secondary primitivism”. This article joins the discourse based on one concrete ethnographic example, the Bru, a Mon-Khmer speaking dry-rice cultivator hill tribe in the Central Vietnamese Highlands. Using detailed ethnographic and ethno-historic data, it argues that the Bru are, if not “native”, at least the oldest known inhabitants of the area inhabited by them — a fact that does not contradict Scott’s deep insight concerning their state evasion.

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’. In I ddeng , J. W. – B randt , J. R. (eds): Greek and Roman Festivals. Content, Meaning, and Practice . Oxford – New York 2012, 323–362; also, B Eard , M. – N orth , J. – P rice , S.: Religions of Rome. Vol. 1 & 2 . Cambridge – New York 1998, 160 n

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. Nevins , Andrew . 2011 . Phonologically conditioned allomorph selection . In M. van Oostendorp , C. Ewen , E. Hume and K. Rice (eds.) The Blackwell companion to phonology. Malden, MA & Oxford : Wiley-Blackwell . 2357 – 2382

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“Up” and “Down”. “Zomia” and the Bru of the Central Vietnamese Highlands

Part II.: Fleeing the state or desire for modernity? reflections on Scott and Salemink

Acta Ethnographica Hungarica
Author: Gábor Vargyas

” változás közben [The Rice, the Rice Goddess, and the Sickle: “Ritual Technologies on the Move] . In Pócs , Éva (ed) Folyamatok és fordulópontok. Tanulmányok Andrásfalvy Bertalan tiszteletére [Processes and Turning Points. Studies in honor of Bertalan

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Állattartók a Neolitikumtól a késő bronzkorig

Esettanulmány Budapest XVII. kerület Rákoscsaba–Major-hegy Dél lelőhely állatcsontleletei kapcsán

Archaeologiai Értesítő
Author: P Csippán

-Castillo , E rik – W olfhagen , J esse – P rice , M ax 2016 zooaRch: An R Package for Zooarchaeological Analyses . https

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E. M. – P rice , J ennifer 1995 Roman Vessel Glass from Excavations in Colchester, 1971–1985 . Colchester Archaeological Report: Colchester Archaeological Trust (Colchester) 8

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Literary History 8 , 411 – 429 . P rice , Christine 1973 : Talking Drums of Africa . New York : Scribner . P ulleyblank , Douglas 1988 : Vocalic Underspecification in Yoruba . Linguistic Inquiry 19 ( 2 ), 233 – 270 . R attray

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1975 Rice, P. M. 1981 Evolution of Specialized Pottery Production: A Trial Model. CurrAnt 22, 219

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livestock (buffalos, elephants) and valuables (bronze gongs and copper cooking vessels, porcelain and pottery rice beer jars, silver jewels, etc.) disappearing – and both warring sides expected them to stand with them and serve them without reservation

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