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Lambeck K 1980: The Earth's Variable Rotation: Geophysical causes and Consequences, Cambridge Univ. Press The Earth's Variable Rotation: Geophysical causes and Consequences

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Hungarian) 5 74 89 Völgyesi L 2003c: Revision of the physical backgrounds of Earth's rotation. XXIII General Assembly of

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Acta Geodaetica et Geophysica Hungarica
Authors: P. Varga, Z. Bus, B. Süle, A. Schreider, C. Bizouard, D. Gambis, and C. Denis

, Varga P 1996: The Earth and its rotation. Low frequency geodynamics. Wichmann Verlag, Heidelberg Varga P. The Earth and its rotation. Low frequency

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-term durability of jasper and greenstone by LA tests; the samples were subjected to different numbers of rotations. The alteration of the slake durability index (Id), according to increasing number of test cycles of Dalmatian (Croatia) marls ( Miščević and

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near Rome (Italy): new insights for tectonic rotation during the last 0.5 Myr . — Annals of Geophysics, 47 / 5 , pp. 1665 – 1673 . Fontes , J.Ch. , G.M. Zuppi 1976

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Geophysical Journal International 134 625 633 Márton, E., D. P. Elston 1987: Tectonic rotations south of the

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. Márton , E. , P. Márton 1996 : Large scale rotations in North Hungary during the Neogene as indicated by paleomagnetic data . — In: Morris , A. , D.H. Tarling (eds): Paleomagnetism and Tectonics of the Mediterranean Region. Geol . Soc. Spec. Publ

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Munk W H, McDonald G J F 1960: The rotation of the Earth. Cambridge Univ. Press The rotation of the Earth Shanker D, Nipun Kapur, Singh

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Acta Geologica Hungarica
Authors: Emő Márton, Davor Pavelić, Bruno Tomljenović, Péter Márton, and Radovan Avanić

This paper summarizes the paleomagnetic results that have been obtained for the Neogene of the Croatian part of the Pannonian Basin since 1995. The paleomagnetic investigations were carried out almost exclusively on sediments, which were deposited in widely differing environments. Most of the paleomagnetic directions can be considered as of pre-folding age, but some were clearly acquired diagenetically or even after deformation. This means that any future magnetostratigraphic study in the southern Pannonian Basin must be carried out with utmost care. Fortunately, the tectonic interpretation of the data is favorably affected by the fact that magnetizations of pre and post-folding ages show the same angles of declinations. They suggest that the entire Croatian part of the Pannonian Basin rotated counterclockwise, by about 30°, after the Early Pontian and before the Holocene. It is also remarkable that Ottnangian data from the Slavonian Mts do not indicate a Tisia-type clockwise rotation during the mid-Miocene.

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In this paper we reconstruct the tectonic evolution of Eastern Turkey, the Lesser Caucasus and NW-N Iran from the Late Carboniferous to Recent. NW Iran is one of the most complicated regions of the country, that with Turkey and the Lesser Caucasus is influenced by movements of the Arabian Plate. The Ahar Block, which is bounded by the Tabriz, Talysh, Araks, Myaneh and Allahyarlu-Hovai Faults, underwent compression and faulting. The block shows counterclockwise rotation through the confining faults and is being compressed by northward pressure from the Arabian Plate. The age and the nature of the Allahyarlu ophiolite, which is located at the northern boundary of the Ahar Block, are not known unequivocally. During the Late Carboniferous the Allahyarlu-Kaleybar-Northern Iran Basin opened, and Neotethys 1 was spreading. During the Permian the Allahyarlu-Kaleybar-Northern Iran Basin changed from a passive to a convergent environment and closed at Late Triassic to Early Jurassic time. In the Early Jurassic Neotethys 1 began to be subducted, causing the opening of the Sevan-Akera back-arc basin. Thereafter the Sevan-Akera Basin and the Neotethys 2 Basin were widening up to the Late Jurassic. The Black Sea-South Caspian Sea-Kopet Dagh Basin opened during the Jurassic. These basins were widening up to the Paleocene, but northward slider replacement of NW Iran caused the separation of the Caspian Sea Basin and the Black Sea Basin and the formation of the Kurdamir Uplift. In the Late Cretaceous the Central Iran basins were closed and the inner-Iran ophiolites were emplaced. Neotethys 1 closed in the Late Cretaceous and Neotethys 2 in the Late Miocene.

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