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Transmission in the AMDA Group . [video online] Available at: http://youtu.be/NjtTn1OfA2o [Accessed: 30 Dec 2013]. A wuah , E. B. 2013b : A Study of Amateur Groups’ Re-Interpretation of Traditional Dances in Ghana: Role on Continuity and Safeguarding

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References Cited Csonka-Takacs , Eszter 2010 The Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage in Service of our Living and Surviving Tradition - Task and Opportunities in Hungary . In Hoppal , Mihaly (ed

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. Houndmills & London : Macmillan Press , 13 – 25 . K urin , Richard 2004 : Safeguarding Intangible Cultural Heritage in the 2003 UNESCO Convention: A Critical Appraisal . In: Museum International , Vol. 56, Nos 1–2 . Oxford : Blackwell Publishing

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orzenszky , Tamás — T örŐ , Balázs — V arga , Csaba J. 2011 : Kék és kék. Tánchagyomány-őrzés a zabola-pávai (Háromszék) cigányközösségekben./Blue and Blue. Safeguarding of Dance Traditions among the Romani/Gipsy Community of Zăbala

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favored by the state officials in each country, but also by the wider community. This is confirmed by almost all of my interview partners. Since most of the countries of former Yugoslavia accepted the UNESCO Convention for Safeguarding Intangible Cultural

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species. Such, for example, is the case with the dragonfly, the protection of which contradicts human fear of this species. Consequently, providing information is complementary to measures and activities implemented by the park in order to safeguard

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the border. The safeguarding of the natural environment nowadays ensures an important economic asset for the entire region. Eco-friendly or green tourism is one of the main directions in terms of local development policies, not only helping local NGOs

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communities. Earlier research suggests that these were interdependent systems, where reputation, personal authority and charisma were the socially utilizable capital that had to be safeguarded. As the saying went: “Reputation costs a great deal to keep up

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area. The important anthropogenic imprint on the landscape caused by the military safeguarding the border remained visible even after the liberation of the border regimes (e.g. Kozorog 2019), but a rich biodiversity was preserved due to the isolative

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This paper illustrates the problems that arose after the approval of a law in Italy (Act no. 482/1999) on the safeguarding and enhancement of traditional linguistic minorities by examining a number of specific examples. The law proved to be not only seriously insufficient, but even had negative repercussions, both with regard to the overall judgement expressed on Italy’s linguistic heritage seen as a cultural heritage, and with regard to the fact that in many situations the very principal of protection was distorted: from the refusal to finance a number of groups rightfully and meritoriously entitled to such funds to the financing of local realities which have very little if nothing to do with linguistic varieties. In general, “language policy” in Italy is negatively influenced by the confusion between “national minority” and “linguistic minority”, one of the major factors in accounting for the failure of initiatives attempting to help the linguistic minorities.

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