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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Engin Karadağ, Şule Betül Tosuntaş, Evren Erzen, Pinar Duru, Nalan Bostan, Berrak Mizrak Şahin, İlkay Çulha, and Burcu Babadağ

Background and aims

Phubbing can be described as an individual looking at his or her mobile phone during a conversation with other individuals, dealing with the mobile phone and escaping from interpersonal communication. In this research, determinants of phubbing behavior were investigated; in addition, the effects of gender, smart phone ownership and social media membership were tested as moderators.

Methods

To examine the cause–effect relations among the variables of the theoretical model, the research employs a correlational design. Participants were 409 university students who were selected via random sampling. Phubbing was obtained via the scales featuring mobile phone addiction, SMS addiction, internet addiction, social media addiction and game addiction. The obtained data were analyzed using a correlation analysis, multiple linear regression analysis and structural equation model.

Results

The results showed that the most important determinants of phubbing behavior are mobile phone, SMS, social media and internet addictions.

Discussion

Although the findings show that the highest correlation value explaining phubbing is a mobile phone addiction, the other correlation values reflect a dependency on the phone.

Conclusions

There is an increasing tendency towards mobile phone use, and this tendency prepares the basis of phubbing.

Open access

Abstract

Background and aims

The primary objective of the present research is to investigate the drivers of technological addiction in college students — heavy users of Information and Communication Technology (ICT). The study places cell phone and instant messaging addiction in the broader context of consumption pathologies, investigating the influence of materialism and impulsiveness on these two technologies. Clearly, cell phones serve more than just a utilitarian purpose. Cell phones are used in public and play a vital role in the lives of young adults. The accessibility of new technologies, like cell phones, which have the advantages of portability and an ever increasing array of functions, makes their over-use increasingly likely.

Methods

College undergraduates (N = 191) from two U.S. universities completed a paper and pencil survey instrument during class. The questionnaire took approximately 15–20 minutes to complete and contained scales that measured materialism, impulsiveness, and mobile phone and instant messaging addiction.

Results

Factor analysis supported the discriminant validity of Ehrenberg, Juckes, White and Walsh's (2008) Mobile Phone and Instant Messaging Addictive Tendencies Scale. The path model indicates that both materialism and impulsiveness impact the two addictive tendencies, and that materialism's direct impact on these addictions has a noticeably larger effect on cell phone use than instant messaging.

Conclusions

The present study finds that materialism and impulsiveness drive both a dependence on cell phones and instant messaging. As Griffiths (2012) rightly warns, however, researchers must be aware that one's addiction may not simply be to the cell phone, but to a particular activity or function of the cell phone. The emergence of multi-function smart phones requires that research must dig beneath the technology being used to the activities that draw the user to the particular technology.

Open access

. Search terms used for mobile phones included “cell phone*,” “cellular phone*,” “cellular telephone*,” “mobile devices,” “mobile phone,” “smart phone” and “smartphone.” Search terms used for addiction included “addiction,” “dependence,” “dependency

Open access

Mobile and non-mobile Internet Use Disorder: Specific risks and possible shared Pavlovian conditioning processes. •

Commentary on: How to overcome taxonomical problems in the study of Internet use disorders and what to do with “smartphone addiction”? (Montag et al., 2019)

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Tania Moretta, Shubao Chen, and Marc N. Potenza

students in Japan . Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences , 72 ( 7 ), 531 – 539 . 10.1111/pcn.12662 Lennon , A. , Oviedo-Trespalacios , O. , & Matthews , S. ( 2017 ). Pedestrian self-reported use of smart phones: Positive attitudes and high

Open access

.588 Personal computer 3 (1.6) 1 (0.5) 7 (3.7) 12 (6.3) Smart phone 8 (4.2) 20 (10.5) 26 (13.7) 23 (12.1) Other (e.g., tablet) 0 1 (0.5) 1 (0.5) 0 Combination 4 (2.1) 12 (6.3) 37 (19.5) 35 (18.4) DIA: Diagnostic interview for Internet, game, SNS, etc. addiction

Open access

). Prevalence of smart phone addiction , sleep quality and associated behaviour problems in adolescents . International Journal of Research in Medical Sciences , 5 ( 2 ), 515 – 519 . https://doi.org/10.18203/2320-6012.ijrms20170142 . 10.18203/2320-6012.ijrms

Open access

popular media of the Internet to obtain sexual partners. Recently, there is an increasing use of Internet-dating applications on smart phones for sexual purpose, namely as a platform for getting sexual partners ( Zlot, Goldstein, Cohen, & Weinstein, 2018

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Davide Marengo, Cornelia Sindermann, Daniela Häckel, Michele Settanni, Jon D. Elhai, and Christian Montag

Experiencias Relacionadas con el Móvil, or CERM, in Spanish) ( Beranuy, Chamarro, Graner, & Carbonell, 2009 ), Mobile Phone Addiction Index ( n =1) (MPAI, Leung, 2007 ), Problematic Mobile Phone Use Scale ( n = 1) (PMPU; Güzeller & Coşguner, 2012 ), Smart-Phone

Open access

version of the smart phone application based addiction scale . Journal of Cognitive-Behavioral Psychotherapy and Research , 8 ( 2 ), 100 - 106 . https://doi.org/10.5455/bcp.20140710040824 . Griffiths , M. D. ( 2000 ). Internet addiction – time to be

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Martina Goslar, Max Leibetseder, Hannah M. Muench, Stefan G. Hofmann, and Anton-Rupert Laireiter

to other chemical agents (i.e., methylphenidate, atomoxetine), for those implemented in other countries compared to Asian countries, and examining global IA compared to IGD and smart phone addiction. With respect to SA, CBT and other

Open access