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.29 Bona , L. , Acs , E. , Lantos , C. , Tomoskozi , S. & Lango , B. ( 2014 ): Human utilization of triticale: technological and nutritional aspects . Comm. Agr. Appl. Biol. Sci. , 79 ( 2 ), 139 – 152

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. Hosseinian , F.S. & Mazza , G. 2009 : Triticale bran and straw: potential new sources of phenolic acids, proanthocyanidins, and lignans . J. Funct. Foods , 1 , 57 – 64

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: L. Bóna, N. Adányi, R. Farkas, E. Szanics, E. Szabó, Gy. Hajós, A. Pécsváradi, and E. Ács

Selenium (Se), a main antioxidant component in cereal grain, is essential for animals and human health reducing risk factors of many dangerous diseases. Over the past decades, intake of this trace element had dropped due to low Se content in large areas of European countries including Hungary. Se-rich, high-protein cereal products became a focus for both animal feed and human consumption. In the study, we examined the following: i) grain Se concentration of wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) and triticale ( Triticosecale Wittm.) intake to detect intra-and inter-genetic variations and ii) possible comparison relationship of this trace element to end product integrity, quality and relevant technological aspects. Se content of the whole meal grain was tested via atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Despite generally poor Se soil content of the experimental area where samples were collected, significant differences were found for both species. In general, triticale contained higher Se concentration than wheat did. Spring type cereals had significantly higher grain Se and protein concentration than those of winter ones. Grain Se content showed positive correlation with magnesium, copper, zinc, manganese, tocopherol and crude protein concentration. Remarkable intra-specific variations were found in Se concentration, however in future, additional studies, methods and resources will be required for identifying ways of increasing Se content in cereal foodstuff and feed.

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It is well established that the ingestion of cereal prolamins, such as gluten, causes the characteristic symptoms of celiac disease (CD) in people predisposed to it. DNA-based PCR method provides new ways to detect gluten in processed foodstuffs, such as bread. The aim of this work was to adapt a new primer pair combination and to initiate a carefully elaborated PCR methodology to experiment with DNA-based analysis. At first, the purity of cleaned DNA was verified using B49317 and A49855 chloroplast DNA primer pair. Then TR01/2 wheat specific PCR primer pair was used for checking the origin of the DNA, and P1/2 microsatellite (SSR) adapted primer pair for detecting allergen (gluten) specific residues. Method optimisation was achieved with cereal flour samples, then bread and dry pasta products from wheat were used, which were analysed as heat-treated samples with three primer pairs. The gluten specific primer pair was tested on cross-reactive cereals such as rye, barley, triticale and on some questionable cereals, such as oat, and pseudo-cereals, e.g. buck wheat and amaranth.

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Ewert, F. & Honermeier, B. (1999): Spikelet initiation of winter triticale and winter wheat in response to nitrogen fertilization. Eur. J. Agron. , 11 , 107-113. Spikelet initiation of winter triticale and winter wheat in

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. Sabovics , M. , Straumite , E. & Galoburda , R. ( 2014 ): The influence of baking temperature on the quality of triticale bread . FoodBalt 2014 Conference Proceedings, Jelgava . pp. 228 – 233

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102 49 55 Przybył, A., Madziar, M. & Tarłlowski, I. (1994): Assessment of the suitability of triticale in the extruded feed for table

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. , S zanics , E. , S zabó , E. , H ajós , G. , Pé C sváradi , A. & Á cs , E. ( 2008 ): Variations in crop nutrient accumulation: Selenium content of wheat and triticale grains . Acta Alimentaria , 38 , 9 – 15

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Policy directive D-99-01: Barley, oats, rye, triticale and wheat — Phytosanitary requirements on import, transshipped, in- Transit and domestic movement. 5 th revision. Transit and domestic movement

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most accessible natural source of γ-oryzanol is rice bran, however, some components of γ-oryzanol can also be found in the pericarp of other cereals such as wheat, rye, corn, and triticale ( S eitz , 1989 ). Control tarhana sample, which was made of 100

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