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Abstract  

The beta-emitting radionuclide 137Cs is precipitated from the Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste by adding sodium tetraphenylborate (TPB). The concentrated and washed precipitate slurry containing CsTPB is transferred to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Salt Processing Cell and hydrolyzed to yield an aqueous product (PHA) free of benzene. The PHA is highly radioactive (1E+11 dpm) and contains some water-soluble organic compounds that need to be analyzed for process control and process history. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods were developed to analyze these compounds with instruments contained in unshielded fume hoods. Removing 137Cs from PHA in a shielded cell prior to HPLC analyses is essential to minimize personnel radiation exposure. In this study ammonium molybdophosphate (Bio-Rad AMP-1) was used for removing 137Cs in PHA (pH 3.8). With a two-step application of AMP slurry, a decontamination factor of 1E+4 was achieved for Cs removal. Two separate HPLC methods were used to analyze four polar organic compounds. The recovery of all the organic compounds were above 85%.

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Journal of Evolutionary Psychology
Authors: D. E. Re, V. Coetzee, D. Xiao, D. Buls, B. P. Tiddeman, L. G. Boothroyd and D. I. Perrett

Abstract

Experience-dependent changes in mate choice preferences may confer an evolutionary benefit by shifting preferences towards traits that are advantageous for specific environments. Previous studies have demonstrated that prolonged exposure to one type of face biases perceptions of subsequently viewed faces and exposure to one type of body biases perceptions of subsequently viewed bodies. We tested whether preferences in facial adiposity were affected by viewing heavy or light bodies. We first assessed facial adiposity preferences by asking Caucasian participants (n = 59) to transform three-dimensional female Caucasian faces along a body mass index (BMI) continuum until they reached optimal attractiveness. Participants then viewed heavy- or light-bodied two-dimensional images with the faces cropped out before repeating the face preference task. Male and female participants who viewed heavy bodies shifted preferences toward significantly higher facial adiposity, while those who viewed the light bodies showed no significant overall shift. These results provide evidence that adaptation to certain body types affects subsequent preferences for facial adiposity, and suggest that adaptation to one body domain may affect preferences in other body domains.

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