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Authors: K. Kiss and K. Szabó

Henderson,M. V. and Reimer, C.W. (2003): Bibliography on the fine structure of diatom frustules (Bacillariophyceae). II. (and deletions, addenda and corrigenda for bibliography I.) - In: Witkowski, A. (ed.): Diatom Monographs. Vol. 3, ARG Gantner Verlag KG, Ruggell, 372 pp. Krammer, K. (2003): Cymbopleura, Delicata, Navicymbula, Gomphocymbellopsis, Afrocymbella. - In: Lange-Bertalot, H. (ed.): Diatoms of Europe. Vol. 4: Diatoms of the European inland waters and comparable habitats elsewhere. ARG Gantner Verlag KG, Ruggell, 530 pp. Lange-Bertalot, H., Cavacini, P., Tagliaventi, N. and Alfinito, S. (2003): Diatoms of Sardinia. Rare and 76 new species in rock pools and other ephemeral waters. - In: Lange-Bertalot, H. (ed.): Iconographia Diatomologica. Vol. 12: Annotated diatom micrographs. ARG Gantner Verlag KG, Ruggell, 438 pp. Metzeltin, D. and Lange-Bertalot,H. (2002): Diatoms from the “Island Continent” Madagascar. - In: Lange-Bertalot, H. (ed.): Iconographia Diatomologica. Vol. 11: Annotated diatom micrographs. ARG Gantner Verlag KG, Ruggell, 286 pp. Van DeVijver, B., Frenot, Y. and Beyens, L. (2002): Freshwater diatoms from Ile de la Possession (Crozet Archipelago, Subantarctica). - Bibliotheca Diatomologica. Band 46.Gebrüder Borntraeger Verlagsbuchhandlung, Berlin, Stuttgart, 412 pp.

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Authors: K. T. Kiss and A Földi
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Functional morphology of Helix pomatia salivary gland cells was studied at light microscopic level by using different histochemical methods. Three cell types could be demonstrated in the salivary gland: mucocytes, granular and vacuolated cells. The distribution and the number of the different cell types were different in active and inactive snails. In active feeding animals, dilatated interlobular salivary ducts were observed, which were never present in inactive ones. In active animals an additional cell type, the cystic cell could also be observed. Periodic acid Schiff staining revealed both mucuos and serous elements in the salivary gland. Furthermore, hematoxyline-eosin staining indicated the occurrence of a cell layer with high mitotic activity in the acini. Applying immunohistochemical methods with monoclonal mouse anti-human Ki-67 clone, B56 and polyclonal rabbit anti-human Ki-67 antibodies, we also were able to demonstrate the occurrence of dividing cells in the salivary gland. Analysis of 1-2 µm semi-thin Araldite sections stained with toluidine-blue showed that the saliva can be released, in addition to possible exocytosis, by the lysis of cystic cells. Using an apoptosis kit, we could also establish that this process was due to rather an apoptotic than a necrotic mechanism. In the salivary gland of active snails, where an intensive salivation takes place, significantly more apoptotic cells occurred, if compared to that of inactive animals. It is suggested that programmed cell death may also be involved in the saliva release.

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The ultrastructure, neuroanatomy and central projection patterns, including the intercellular connections of the statocyst hair cells of the pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, were studied, applying different intra- and extracellular cellular staining techniques combined with correlative light- and electron microscopy. Based on the ultrastructure different hair cells could be distinguished according to their vesicle and granule content, meanwhile the general organization of the sensory neurons was rather uniform, showing clearly separated perinuclear and “vesicular” cytoplasmic regions. Following intra- and extracellular labeling with fluorescence dyes or HRP a typical, local arborization of the hair cells was demonstrated in the cerebral ganglion neuropil, indicating a limited input-output system connected to the process of gravireception. Correlative light- and electron microscopy of HRP-labeled hair cells revealed both axo-somatic and axo-axonic output contacts of hair cell varicosities, and input on sensory axons located far from the terminal arborizations. Our findings suggest (i) a versatile ultrastructural background of hair cells corresponding possibly to processing different gravireceptive information, and (ii) the synaptic (or non-synaptic) influence of gravireception at different anatomical (terminal, axonal and cell body) levels when processed centrally. The results may also serve as a functional morphological background for previously obtained physiological and behavioral observations.

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Authors: B. Bolla, G. Fehér and K. Kiss
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Authors: M. Duleba and Zs. Trábert
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Benthic diatom investigations of some Hungarian streams have been carried out in order to find reference sites in assistance to the ecological quality analysis of the different river types according to the Hungarian river typology. On the basis of the coevaluation of biological and chemical parameters, among the investigated streams, some part of Kemence stream seems to be the appropriate reference site for the classification of the highland, siliceous rivers of Hungary. However, further invastigations are needed for the selection of reference sites for the other types of Hungarian river typology. This is the most difficult in the case of lowland rivers, which are exposed to more severe anthropogenic impacts. Important is the question which biological parameters should be investigated and considered when assessing the ecological condition of our waters. In the United States, e.g. the assessment of the relative abundance of Achnanthidium minutissimum is quite widespread (Stevenson and Bahls 1999), the extent of which indicates the level of disturbance. The use of this method is hampered, on one hand, by the fact that A. minutissimum is an early coloniser species which means that if we do not take samples from mature periphyton, we might find it dominant simply because of that, and, on the other hand, that distinguishing between the species varieties is not always unambiguous under light microscope because of its small size, and these can have different ecological needs. It is also recommended to calculate species richness, diversity and evenness (Stevenson and Bahls 1999), but based on our investigations these parameters are not in correlation with water quality. Investigation of other diatom features such as tolerance and sensitivity, some autecological parameters (as it was applied and recommended by Fore and Grafe 2002 for investigating the reaction of diatom associations to anthropogenic disturbances) might also be useful in completing the water quality analysis of rivers, however, these methods need further investigations. Some of the indices (EPI-D, IPS, IBD) calculated with the software Omnidia are suitable for the classification of our rivers, but the investigation of more rivers, flowing through different types of stone are necessary to choose the appropriate indices. The reason for this is that the different indices work with a different register of species and obviously those indices will prove to be suitable the species register of which shows the highest similarity to the diatom associations of the certain water type.

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