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Adalékok az esztergomi Keresztény Múzeum egy bolognai képéhez

Contributions to a Bolognese painting in the Christian Museum, Esztergom

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
Ágnes Katona

Abstract

I wish to prove that the painting preserved in the store of the Christian Museum of Esztergom attributed to: “Bolognese painter, last quarter of the 16th century: Self-Portrait of the Artist with his Family” was painted in 1583–84 by Tiburzio Passarotti (1553–1612), the first-born son of the great Bolognese painter Bartolomeo Passarotti (1529–1592). The painting shows Tiburzio's wife, Taddea Gaggi and his younger son, Arcangelo. I have the following most important analogues to the attribution and the date of the work: Tiburzio Passarotti's Self-Portrait in the Uffizi, Florence, and Bartolomeo Passarotti's Family Picture in Dresden. I would like to underline that the painting attributed to “Emilian painter, last quarter of the 16th century: Portrait of a Noble Family” found in a privat collection in Hungary was executed by Bartolomeo Passarotti by his own hand. My opinion is verified by the comparision of the relatively late works of Bartolomeo. This picture (1582–83) also represents the portraits of Taddea Gaggi and Arcangelo.

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II. Ferdinánd Habsburg főherceg (1529–1595) portréja az esztergomi Keresztény Múzeumban

The portrait of Ferdinand II Habsburg archduke (1529–1595) in the esztergom Christian Museum

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
Ágnes Katona

I would like to prove that the picture in the stock of the Esztergom Christian Museum attributed as North Italian painter, end of 16th century, Noble Man in Armor was painted by the unknown Bergamo follower of Francesco Terzi (Bergamo, 1523 – Roma 1591) around 1569.

I certify the attribution and its dating by comparing it with the works of Terzi. Francesco Terzi court painter and graphical artist worked mainly in Austria. The main point of the painting is that – according to my researches – it portrays Ferdinand II, the Habsburg Archduke, famous collector, who himself ordered many works of Terzi. I bring up analogies to this attribution representing Ferdinand II. I describe the opinions of researchers in the question of attributing and dating these works and also take a position in it.

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