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  • Author or Editor: A. Meijer x
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Abstract  

The development of a set of bibliometric tools to contribute to the assessment and monitoring of utility of university and non-university research institutes to society is described. Trade publications were weighted according to the utility of the journals for relevant nonscientific user groups. Furthermore, one indicator addresses the extent to which a general or a specific type of audience is addressed. Results are shown for one university and one university department. In general, validation interviews show that the indicator provide a good first estimation of the potential effectivity of the knowledge transfer efforts by means of publications in trade journals to practice and policy bodies.

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Abstract  

The present bibliometric study extends previous work by focusing on the research performance of departments in the natural and life sciences, the social and behavioral sciences, and the humanities. The present study covers all 70 departments from one agricultural university, and several veterinary departments of a second university. The impact analysis was extended by including other types of documents than journal articles. For about a third of the departments, publications not covered in citation indexes accounted for at least 30% of the citations to their total oeuvre. To deal with different citation and publication habits in the various fields, both short-term and medium-term impact assessments were made. The commonly used three year window is not universally applicable, as our results show. The inclusion of self-citations forms an important source of error in the ratio of actual/expected impact. To cope with this, the trend and level of self-citations was compared at university level with that in a matched sample of publications. Moreover, at a departmental level, self-citation rates were used to detect departments with divergent levels of self-citation. The expected impact of journals accounted for only 18% of the variance in actual impact. Comparison of bibliometric indicators with two peer evaluations showed that the bibliometric impact analyses provided important additional information.

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Abstract  

The understanding and prediction of radionuclide migration within the geosphere of a high-level radioactive waste repository requires knowledge of chemical and physical processes. In this paper, we present an overview of the investigations being performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the site characterization activites of the Yucca Mountain Project. The areas of investigation include: the determination of solubility concentration limits and chemical speciation for fission products and actinides; the collection of sorption data and understanding of sorption mechanisms; and the transport mechanism of advection, diffusion, and dispersion.

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