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  • Author or Editor: A. Porter x
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Abstract  

Study of interdisciplinary research processes and performance is hampered by a lack of data. This project investigated possible indicators based in the open scientific literature to measure such processes. Focusing on theJournal Citation Reports as a suitable data base, alternative indicators were validated on a sample of 383 articles drawn from 19 journals. The results support the use ofCitations Outside Category as an indicator of cross-disciplinary research activity. An estimated version of this indicator is used to examine three research categories — Demography, Operations Research/Management Science, and Toxicology — as to the extent of cross-disciplinary citation occurring by the journals in these categories and to them. Results suggest thatCitations Outside Category can be a quite informative bibliometric measure. A key substantive finding is that citation across broad field categories (engineering, life sciences, physical sciences, and social sciences) is extremely infrequent.

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Abstract  

This project compares various bibliometric measures and scientists' own judgments. Publication and cittion data are compiled for two cohorts of chemists awarded Sloan Fellowships. Citation patterns differ substantially between most cited papers and those these authors identify as their best. Theoretical, empirical, and methodological papers are contrasted as well. In addition, temporal citation patterns show that recognition spreads beyond the research area of a particular paper to yield cross-disciplinary citation surprisingly rapidly. Results suggest the utility of studying citation patterns among the Institute for Scientific Information Subject Categories, but also caution against equating publication and citation counts with scientific progress.

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Summary  

A conventional push-rod dilatometer is modified in order to accurately correlate the measured density to the predicted sample temperature of alloys in the phase-change regime. This new configuration makes use of a standard furnace assembly; however, the specimen is now symmetrically encased in a well-instrumented, graphite cylindrical shell. The combination of system geometry and high-conductivity sample holder material promotes the development of a simplified heat transfer model. The solution of this model properly correlates the measured density to that of the actual sample temperature based on using remote, sample-holder temperature measurements. Preliminary results using aluminum A356 provide insight into the proposed configuration.

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