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  • Author or Editor: A. Van Heeringen x
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Abstract  

In the Netherlands the research worker in the universities on an average publishes in scientific journals three times as much as the scientist in industry. However, the universities differ considerably regarding their publications score per scientists; although this difference is diminishing. Furthermore this study shows per discipline the level of co-operation between Dutch and foreign research establishments. In general the level of co-operation with other research institutes has no positive effect on output. The analysis does show that the institutions with the largest financial support from the Research Council (an organization with the task of improving the output of research by means of fostering co-operation between research workers) are also the most productive ones.

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Abstract  

In this paper we show that it is theoretically impossible to draw empirically founded conclusions about the relation between age and productivity. Only the relation between age and productivityincrease can be verified empirically. With this limitation in mind, a subsequent analysis of productivity data of Dutch physicists, chemists en economists, indicates that thegrowth rate of productivity is higher at ages under 35 than at ages over 35.

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Scientometrics
Authors: A. Van Heeringen and P. Dijkwel

Abstract  

The main aim of this study is to estimate to what extent the productivity of researchers is influenced by their mobility. Based on emperical data of Dutch scientists it is shown that job mobility is a characteristic of productive scientists rather than a means to enhance productivity. Field mobility appears to stimulate productivity in the long run.

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Abstract  

Document cocitation analysis, as developed by Small and Griffith, was employed as a means of assessing current Dutch participation in science. The method compared overall Dutch published contributions to science (1–2%) with the percentage of Dutch papers in both the cited cores of clusters and the citing margins of clusters (newly published papers). It was possible to identify clusters ranging form ones with strong Dutch participation to those without Dutch cited or citing papers. The method may help policymakers to detect areas of special concern. The technique can be used for any nation, but may be particularly helpful for the smaller developed countries. We consider the ideal distribution of scientific productivity for those countries.

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