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The growing interest in emmer cultivation has no doubt been stimulated by the increasing demand for traditional foods with an image of naturalness, especially on the organic market. The new economic situation could stimulate the breeding and production of emmer as the source of an especially valuable foodstuff. It is the task of breeders to produce emmer varieties that can survive even the hardest winter occurring in the targeted cultivation area without serious damage. The best sources to improve the winter hardiness are probably the emmer genetic resources stored in genebanks. Unfortunately no public data are available on the frost tolerance and winter hardiness of the various genebank accessions. In the present research the frost tolerance and winter hardiness of 10 winter emmer genebank accessions were studied under nursery and phytotronic conditions. The results suggest that the majority of the populations studied are frost-sensitive, and only few landraces have an acceptable level of winter hardiness and frost resistance.

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The aim of the study was to determine the characteristics of Szabolcs-Szatmár-Bereg county in North-Eastern Hungary and to elaborate an environmentally sound agricultural strategy. 50% of Szabolcs-Szatmár-Bereg county is arable land (303,950 ha). After the change of regime there was no significant decrease in the size of the arable land. Cultivation is still practised on soils of poorer quality. Under the changed production conditions, crop cultivation in its present form does not come up to the economic expectations. The sowing structure is not suited to the regional climate and soil conditions; 75% of the arable land is occupied by only 5 species of plant. A change in the cultivation profile (afforestation) can be expected on connected marginal areas where economic calculations indicate that economical cultivation is not possible. A typical feature of the region's cereal production is that it takes up significantly more arable land than is justified: in recent years the average ratio of cereals was 60–65%. In certain microregions the production of protein fodders is recommended for the economical production of better quality meat. There has been an increase in the area sown to triticale, peas, beans and cucumber for seed production. The production of flowers, vegetables, spices and herbs should be promoted; these plants require manual work, so they could play a significant role in solving employment problems. On more unfavourable areas, suitable for the cultivation of agricultural products, the production of low-input plants (e.g. rye, triticale, sorghum) suitable for extensive cultivation should be considered. In small regions with favourable ecological and infrastructural situations the area sown to crops with greater production value and greater labour requirements can be expected to increase.

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On areas used for agriculture copper toxicity is one of the most important forms of heavy metal pollution, especially where field crops are to be grown in fields previously used as orchards or vineyards, treated for a long period with pesticides containing copper. Only varieties with good tolerance of soil with a high copper content should be grown on such areas. The selection of copper-tolerant varieties is complicated, however, by the fact that it is difficult to study copper tolerance under field conditions. Heavy metal tolerance is generally tested in hydroponic cultures, in which interfering factors can be minimised, but it is impossible to test a large number of genotypes or segregating generations using this method. Another problem in such experiments is that the conditions existing in hydroponic cultures bear little resemblance to those found in the field, so little information is obtained on the real adaptation of the varieties. The aim of the present experiments was thus to elaborate a soil-based technique suitable for determining the copper tolerance of various genotypes and allowing the simultaneous testing of a large number of genotypes under conditions approaching those found in the field. The results indicate that the copper tolerance of seedlings can be determined by growing them to an age of 2 weeks in soil containing 1000-1500 mg/kg CuSO4 × 5 H2O, since genetic differences in copper tolerance could be clearly distinguished under these conditions. The copper tolerance of plants grown in copper-containing soil exhibited a close correlation with the results obtained in physiological tests in hydroponic culture.

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There is still disagreement among scientists on the exact origin of common wheat (Triticum aestivum ssp. aestivum), one of the most important crops in the world. The first step in the development of the hexaploid aestivum group (ABD) may have been hybridisation between T. urartu (A), as pollinator, and a species related to the Sitopsis section of the Aegilops genus (S) as cytoplasm donor, leading to the creation of the tetraploid species T. turgidum ssp. dicoccoides (AB). The following step may have involved hybridisation between T. turgidum ssp. dicoccon (AB genome, cytoplasm donor), a descendant of T. turgidum ssp. dicoccoides, and Ae. tauschii (D genome, pollinator), resulting in the hexaploid species T. aestivum ssp. spelta (ABD) or some other hulled type. This form may have given rise to naked types, including T. aestivum ssp. aestivum (ABD). The ancestors of the tetraploid T. timopheevii (AG) may have been the diploid T. urartu (A genome, pollinator) and Ae. speltoides (S genome, cytoplasm donor). Species in the timopheevii group developed later than those in the turgidum group, as confirmed by the fact that the G genome is practically identical to the S genome of Ae. speltoides, while the more ancient B genome has undergone divergent evolution. Hybridisation between T. timopheevii (AG, cytoplasm donor) and T. monococcum (A m, pollinator) may have resulted in the species T. zhukovskyi (AGA m). Research into the relationships between the various species is of assistance in compiling the taxonomy of wheat and in avoiding misunderstandings arising from the fact that some species are known by two or more synonymous names.

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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: J. Horvát, G. Kazinczi, A. Takács, M. Torma, and A. Kovács
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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: A. Nyéki, G. Milics, A.J. Kovács, and M. Neményi

This paper reviews the works related to the effect of soil compaction on cereal yield and focuses on research of field experiments. The reasons for compaction formation are usually a combination of several types of interactions. Therefore one of the most researched topics all over the world is the changes in the soil’s physical and chemical properties to achieve sustainable cereal production conditions. Whether we are talking about soil bulk density, physical soil properties, water conductivity or electrical conductivity, or based on the results of measurements of on-line or point of soil sampling resistance testing, the fact is more and more information is at our disposal to find answers to the challenges.

Thanks to precision plant production technologies (PA) these challenges can be overcome in a much more efficient way than earlier as instruments are available (geospatial technologies such as GIS, remote sensing, GPS with integrated sensors and steering systems; plant physiological models, such Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT), which includes models for cereals etc.). The tests were carried out first of all on alteration clay and sand content in loam, sandy loam and silt loam soils. In the study we examined especially the change in natural soil compaction conditions and its effect on cereal yields.

Both the literature and our own investigations have shown that the soil moisture content changes have the opposite effect in natural compaction in clay and sand content related to cereal yield. These skills would contribute to the spreading of environmental, sustainable fertilizing devoid of nitrate leaching planning and cereal yield prediction within the framework of the PA to eliminate seasonal effects.

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Abstract  

It is suggested to spend some time in a cave for curing respiratory diseases. Some ascribe the healing effect partly to radon. In Hungary in the Hospital Cave of Tapolca the mean radon concentration shows 17 times difference in the winter and in the summer period. The change of the forced exhaled volume in 1 s (FEV1) values was examined measured by 1824 patients in this cave. By 70% of the patients the FEV1 value improved, by 30% it became worse but these were independent from the radon concentration of the cave. Therefore, radon concentration has no positive effect during the treatments performed in Tapolca.

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Thirty-three varieties of dairy products were analysed for fat and cholesterol contents, and a high correlation (r=0.983) was found between these two compositional attributes. Cholesterol concentration was independent of processing factors such as heat-treatment of the raw material, use of starter culture, type of the starter organisms employed and whipping or flavouring of the product. The non-fat varieties of fluid, fermented and dried milks showed significantly increased cholesterol-to-fat ratios compared to the other products tested because they contained considerable amounts of small fat globules and, therefore, had a large surface area with cholesterol bound to the fat globule membranes. The results of this study may be useful when establishing dietary guidelines for the general public according to health concerns, when formulating diets for population groups with special requirements or when assessing fat and cholesterol intakes in epidemiological studies aimed at investigating the relationship between diet and health.

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The responses of the snail central neurons (Helix pomatia, Lymnaea stagnalis) and the isolated Helix heart were characterized evoked by cyanobacterial extracts (Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii ACT strains) isolated from Lake Balaton (Hungary). The nicotinergic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors in the CNS (both excitatory and inhibitory) were blocked by the extracts of ACT 9502 and ACT 9505 strains and the anatoxin- a (homoanatoxin-a) producing reference strain of Oscillatoria sp. (PCC 6506), similar to the inhibitory effects of the pure anatoxin-a. The enhancement of the ACh responses by the ACT 9504 extract suggests additional, probably acetylcholine esterase inhibitory mechanisms. On the isolated Helix heart the crude ACT 9505 and PCC 6506 extracts evoked frequency increase and transient twitch contraction, opposite to the ACh evoked heart relaxation. Anatoxin-a similarly contracted the heart but did not increase its contration frequency. These data suggest the involvement of some non-cholinergic mechanisms, acting very likely by direct modulation of the electrical or contractile system of the isolated heart. Diversity of the effects evoked by the cyanobacterial extracts in the CNS and heart suggest pharmacologically different neuroactive components among the secondary metabolites of the cyanobacteria acting on both (anatoxin-a like) cholinergic and (unidentified) non-cholinergic receptors.

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