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  • Author or Editor: Al-Hashimi x
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Abstract  

Hair has been used as a bioindicator, as a means to measure environmental and occupational contamination, and a a tool for individualization in the forensic field. Because hair is a product of human metabolic activities, its elemental content is of interest in the examination of normal (healthy) metabolism and abnormal (diseased) metabolism. Employing hair analysis, sources of environmental pollution can be identified. Some recent INAA hair measurements were carried out in our laboratory. Hair samples of six new-born infants and their mothers were collected, washed, and analyzed according to standard procedures. By 5-minute irradiation (flux 2.5×1011 n·cm–2·s–1) and gamma spectrometric analysis of hair and standard samples, elemental concentrations of Mg, Mn, Cu, Na, V, S, Al, Ca, and the halides were determined. Hair analysis of new-born infants should be of special interest, because it most likely represents endogeneous contribution. Hair assays of mothers and babies may prove to be clear mirrors which reflect observations pertaining to environmental metal mobilization and internal metabolic conditions. This work presents, along with a review of the subject, the results of a case study and identifies areas where further research is needed.

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Authors: M. Al-Janabi and H. Al-Hashimi

Abstract  

Tin-indium generator systems were made with commercial hydrated zirconium oxide, silica gel and hydrated zirconium oxide prepared by the AMPHLETT method. The adsorption capacity of tin has been determined by both spectrophotometric analysis and gammaspectrometry. Zirconium break-through has been determined and compared with the literature values. The dependence of the adsorption capacity on the particle size has been investigated. The effect of autoclaving on the generator systems has been examined.

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Authors: A. Al-Hashimi, S. Krishnan and R. Jervis

Abstract  

Human hair has been proved to be a better dosimeter than even blood for tracing most of the heavy metal toxins when they penetrate the biosphere. The high precision of the neutron activation analysis (NAA) enabled researchers to elegantly differentiate between endogenous and exogenous contamination and to thoroughly study poisonings caused by these physiologically-unimportant elements. An extensive amount of bench-scale work has been accomplished in these laboratories to show the capacity of INAA to detect the presence of 10 nuclides (or more) with a precision of about 5%. The principal objective of the present study was to employ this assaying power and the tendency of scalp hair to uptake metals from aqueous solutions, to design an adsorption system which can easily be used by the waste-management people who are searching for a cost-effective technique to monitor and remove these pollutants from relatively large volumes of industrial effluents.

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