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  • Author or Editor: Alexander Tichy x
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In the present study, 240 cases of dogs with seizures were analysed retrospectively. The aim was to examine the underlying aetiology and to compare primary or idiopathic epilepsy (IE) with symptomatic epilepsy (SE) concerning signalment, history, ictal pattern, clinical and neurological findings. The diagnosis of symptomatic epilepsy was based on confirmed pathological changes in haematology, serum biochemistry, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis and morphological changes of the brain by CT/MRI or histopathological examination. Seizure aetiologies were classified as idiopathic epilepsy (IE, n = 115) and symptomatic epilepsy (SE, n = 125). Symptomatic epilepsy was mainly caused by intracranial neoplasia (39) and encephalitis (23). The following variables showed significant difference between the IE and SE group: age, body weight, presence of partial seizures, cluster seizures, status epilepticus, ictal vocalisation and neurological deficits. In 48% of the cases, seizures were found to be due to IE, while 16% were due to intracranial neoplasia and 10% to encephalitis. Status epilepticus, cluster seizures, partial seizures, vocalisation during seizure and impaired neurological status were more readily seen with symptomatic epilepsy. If the first seizure occurred between one and five years of age or the seizures occurred during resting condition, the diagnosis was more likely IE than SE.

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the variability of the slope of the pelvis in different dog breeds and the correlation between pelvic slope and femoral subluxation. The sacrum–pelvis angle (SPA), the angulation between the sacrum and the axis of the ilium was created to represent the differences in the slope of the pelvis on lateral pelvic radiographs. The Norberg angle (NA) was used to quantify the femoral subluxation on hip-extended radiographs. Archived standard ventrodorsal hip radiographs and lateral lumbosacral radiographs of the same dogs were retrieved and a single observer measured the SPA and the NA in each case. A total of 180 dogs from six different breeds were sampled. The SPA varied between 40° and 71.5° and the NA between 71.2° and 113.9°. The findings indicated that there are significant individual and interbreed variations in the slope of the pelvis. However, no significant relationship between the slope of the pelvis and femoral subluxation could be identified.

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate retrospectively the prevalence of the complicated and uncomplicated forms of babesiosis and to evaluate various laboratory and clinical parameters of dogs infected with Babesia canis in order to assess their prognostic value regarding the outcomes of the disease. Medical records, complete blood count and serum biochemical analysis from the animal hospital information system of 240 dogs were reviewed and evaluated retrospectively. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to ascertain correlations between alterations in the obtained parameters and survival probability. The results showed that creatinine levels of more than 5 mg/dL and phosphate levels of more than 3 mmol/L have a highly significant link to death (P ≤ 0.001). Albumin levels of <2.2 g/dL (P = 0.003) and a rectal body temperature below 38 °C (P ≤ 0.001) may also serve as prognostic markers for the severity of the disease. If renal involvement was present, 33.9% of the dogs died, while 40.0% of the dogs died in the presence of pancreatitis. The parameters creatinine, phosphate, albumin and rectal temperature serve as reliable predictive markers of an increased risk of death in the case of an infection with B. canis.

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Authors: Borbála A. Lorincz, Agustina Anson, Péter Csébi, Gábor Bajzik, Gergely Biró, Alexander Tichy, Balázs B. Lorincz and Rita Garamvölgyi

Hippocampal sclerosis is the most common imaging finding of intractable human epilepsy, and it may play an important role in canine and feline epileptogenesis and seizure semiology, too. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) criteria of hippocampal sclerosis are T2 hyperintensity, shrinkage and loss of internal structure. The detection of these changes is often challenging by subjective visual assessment of qualitative magnetic resonance (MR) images. The recognition is more reliable with quantitative MR methods, such as T2 relaxometry. In the present prospective study including 31 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy and 15 control dogs showing no seizure activity, we compared the T2 relaxation times of different brain areas. Furthermore, we studied correlations between the hippocampal T2 values and age, gender and skull formation. We found higher hippocampal T2 values in the epileptic group than in the control; however, these findings were not statistically significant. No correlations were found with age, gender or skull formation. In the individual analysis six epileptic dogs presented higher hippocampal T2 relaxation times than the cut-off value. Two of these dogs were also evaluated as abnormal in the visual assessment. Individual analysis of hippocampal T2 relaxation times may be a helpful method to understand hippocampal involvement in canine epilepsy.

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