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  • Author or Editor: Andor Doszpoly x
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Partial genome sequence of a herpes-like virus, isolated from Siberian sturgeon ( Acipenser baeri ), was determined and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. The virus (SbSHV) has been shown to be the causative agent of an acute disease with high mortality in farmed juvenile sturgeons in Russia. Two fragments (of 7000 and 300 base pairs in length) encompassing 3 complete and 3 partial ORFs were amplified by PCR. Sturgeon herpesvirus strains, classified into species Acipenserid herpesvirus 2 (AciHV-2), have been isolated and partially sequenced from several regions (California, Idaho, Oregon and Canada) of North America from white ( A. transmontanus) and shortnose sturgeons ( A. brevirostrum ). The sequence of the SbSHV strain shared highest identity with that of the Canadian strain originating from shortnose sturgeon. The phylogenetic analysis also confirmed that SbSHV is closely related to AciHV-2 and could also be classified into this virus species. This is the first report on the occurrence of AciHV-2 in Europe. Previously, only another virus species, AciHV-1 has been detected in farmed white sturgeons in Italy. The size and position of ORFs in the examined gene block confirmed that this genomic region is highly conserved in members of the genus Ictalurivirus .

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Abstract

The complete genomic sequence along with phylogenetic analyses of an adenovirus (AdV), isolated from a dead captive pygmy marmoset (Callithrix pygmaea) from a Hungarian zoo is reported. Earlier, based on the phylogenetic analysis of the sequence of a PCR-amplified fragment from the DNA polymerase gene, the pygmy marmoset AdV (PMAdV) has been reported to cluster closest to certain chiropteran AdVs. In the following years similar AdVs were discovered in additional mammalian hosts, including a skunk (Mephitis mephitis), African pygmy hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris), North American porcupines (Erethizon dorsatum) and grey fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus). After the full genome analysis of the skunk adenovirus (SkAdV-1), a novel species Skunk mastadenovirus A (SkAdV-A) has been established. The AdVs, originating from the African pygmy hedgehogs, have been found to belong to virus species SkAdV-A. Partial gene sequences from the porcupine AdVs have also implied their very close genetic relatedness to SkAdV-A. The complete genomic sequence of PMAdV, examined in this study, was found to share 99.83% nucleotide identity with SkAdV-1, thus unequivocally represents a genomic variant of SkAdV-1. The observation that viruses classifiable as SkAdV-A are able to infect and cause diseases in several, distantly related mammals seems to deserve further studies to elucidate the infection biology of this intriguing AdV.

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The prevalence and distribution of piscine circoviruses (CVs) were tested in a routine virus monitoring programme in Lake Balaton, Hungary. A high prevalence of European eel CV (EeCV) was found in the apparently healthy eel population (35.5%). The copy number of the viral DNA in different organs was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. The results suggested that some eel specimens were in active viraemic status despite their asymptomatic condition. Furthermore, a novel, previously undescribed CV was also detected in eel and sichel samples. Full genome characterisation confirmed that the virus represents a novel EeCV species (EeCV-2). The genome contains an integrated eel chromosome-derived fragment, suggesting that the original host of the virus was the eel and it probably emerged subsequently in the sichel by host switching. In some samples, an additional, 1,111-nt-long circular ssDNA was also observed involving a CV-like stem-loop structure and an ORF showing homology to CV capsid protein genes, without any sign of a replication initiator protein sequence.

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Abstract

By a broad-range PCR, we detected a novel herpesvirus (HV) in the specimen of a wels catfish (Silurus glanis) presenting disseminated, carp pox-like dermal lesions all over its body. The sequence analysis of the 463-bp PCR product from the viral DNA polymerase gene indicated the presence of a hitherto unknown virus, a putative member of the family Alloherpesviridae in the sample. Another PCR, targeting the terminase gene of fish HVs, provided an additional genomic fragment of over 1,000 bp. Surprisingly, the sequence of a co-amplified, off-target PCR product revealed its origin from a putative gene homologous to ORF87 and ORF45 of cyprinid HVs and anguillid herpesvirus 1 (AngHV-1), respectively. With specific primers, designed according to the genomic maps of the cyprinid and anguillid HVs, a genomic fragment of 15 kb was also amplified and sequenced by primer walking. In phylogeny inferences, based on several genes, the putative wels catfish HV clustered closest to various cyprinid HVs or to AngHV-1. The novel virus, named as silurid herpesvirus 2, represents a distinct species in the genus Cyprinivirus. However, its association with the skin disease remains unclear.

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Abstract

Two adult barbels (Barbus barbus) with visible skin tumours were subjected to histopathological and molecular examinations. The fish were caught in the River Danube near Budapest. Papillomas were found around their oral cavity, at the operculum and at the pectoral fins, while epidermal hyperplasias were seen on the body surface. Cyprinid herpesvirus 1 (CyHV-1) was detected in the kidney of the specimens by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and barbel circovirus 1 (BaCV1) was found in all internal organs and in the tissues of the tumours. The whole genome of BaCV1 and three conserved genes from the genome of CyHV-1 were sequenced. Previously, BaCV1 had been reported only once from a mass mortality event among barbel fry. The whole genome sequence of our circovirus shared 99.9% nucleotide identity with that of the formerly reported BaCV1. CyHV-1 is known to infect common carp and coloured carp (Cyprinus carpio), and has been assumed to infect other cyprinid fish species as well. We found the nucleotide sequences of the genes of CyHV-1 to be identical in 98.7% to those of the previous isolates from carp. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first molecular confirmation of the presence of CyHV-1 DNA in cyprinid fish species other than carp.

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