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Kísérlet néhány magyarországi ötvösjegy feloldására XVIII

An attempt to solving some Hungarian goldsmith's marks XVIII

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
András Grotte
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Ötvöslegények vándorúton

Goldsmith’s Apprentices Journeying

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
András Grotte
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Kísérlet néhány magyarországi ötvösjegy feloldására XIX.

An attempt to elucidate some Hungarian Goldsmiths’ marks XIX

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
András Grotte

To continue my previous papers, I wish to present and try to elucidate the new makers’ marks and mark variants found in private collections and the art trade. The time interval is again the 18–19th centuries. The first to be mentioned are the twin capital cities Buda and Pest, as well as Óbuda. In Buda, new data have been found about Franciscus Mechthler, in Pest about Carolus Schmidt and Menyhárt Boll, in Óbuda of Fülöp Adler. This is followed in alphabetic order by several cities of the Hungarian Kingdom. Arad (Arad, R), Balassagyarmat, Besztercebánya (Banská Bystrica, Neusohl, SK), Eger (Erlau), Esztergom (Gran), Győr (Raab), Igló (Spišská Nová Ves, SK), Kassa (Košice, Kaschau, SK), Kismarton (Eisenstadt, A), Liptószentmiklós (Liptovský Svätý Mikuláš, SK), Losonc (Lučenec, Lizenz, SK), Miskolc, Nagybecskerek (Zren­ janin, SR), Nagykanizsa (Großkirchen), Nagyszeben (Si biu, Hermannstadt, R), Rimaszombat (Rimavská Sobota, Großsteffelsdorf, SK), Selmecbánya (Banská Štiavnica, Schemnitz, SK), Szatmárnémeti (Satu Mare, Sathmar, R), Szentendre, Temesvár (Timişoara, Temeswar, R), Tolna, Zágráb (Zagreb, Agram, HR). The weight of new infor­ mation varies by settlements. In some places only a new version of the known hallmark was found, there are places where new goldsmiths were come across or new biographic data were found of known masters. Finally, I enumerate the goldsmiths’ works in Hungary which display Viennese city mark imitations in addition to the makers’ marks. The article is accompanied with a diagram of 117 goldsmiths’ marks.

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Kísérlet néhány magyarországi ötvösjegy feloldására XV.

Attempt at deciphering some Hungarian goldsmith’s marks XV.

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
András Grotte

As the next step in a series of publications, the author presents so-far unpublished maker marks and mark variants found in art collections and the art trade, trying to decipher the newly found ones. Concerning already known marks, he relies basically on Elemér Kőszeghy’s book of marks and when the Pest-Buda marks are considered, the work of Ilona P. Brestyányszky is consulted. Additional information is now provided, and some earlier information corrected, about the 19th century goldsmiths of Buda, Pest, Arad, Besztercebánya, Kolozsvár, Lőcse, Nagyvárad, Pápa, Rozsnyó, Veszprém on the basis of registers of births, marriages and deaths and other lists. In the appendix there is a tabular summary of the exhibition and art trade occurrences of artifacts bearing the hallmark of the Kolozsvár goldsmith Sándor Erdődi who worked in the 1840s and ‘50s.

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Kísérlet néhány magyarországi ötvösjegy feloldására XVII

An attempt at solving some Hungarian goldsmith’s marks XVII

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
András Grotte

Continuing with his earlier publications (Művészettörténeti Értesítő) the author presents new goldsmith’s marks and mark variants found in private collections and the art trade and makes an attempt to decode them. For already published marks he relies on Elemér Kőszeghy’s book (Elemér Kőszeghy: Hungarian goldsmith’s marks from the Middle Ages to 1867. Budapest 1936) and for the Pest-Buda marks on Ilona P. Brestyánszky’s work (History of goldsmith’s art in Pest-Buda. Budapest 1977), referring to the running numbers in these works. He presents new data about the goldsmiths of Pest, Brassó (Braşov, Kronstadt, Romania), Debrecen, Eperjes (Prešov, Preschau, Slovakia), Lőcse (Levoča, Leutschau, Slovakia), Nagyvárad (Oradea, Großwardein, Romania), Rimaszombat (Rimavská Sobota, Gross-Steffelsdorf, Slovakia), Szabadka (Subotica, Serbia) and Szatmárnémeti (Satu Mare, Romania).

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“Gyöngyházbúl való pelikán forma…” Rákóczi László csészéje Hamburgban

“Pelican shape made out of mother-of-pearl…” László Rákóczi's cup in Hamburg

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
András Grotte

Abstract

The mother-of-pearl cup in a silver mount with a lid adorned with a pelican was first mentioned in the 1704 inventory of the properties of Erzsébet Rákóczi (1645–1707). Presumably inherited from her father László Rákóczi, the goldsmith's object passed to the treasury of the Pálffy family after Erzsébet's death, in 1713, only to disappear from the sources for centuries. In 1907 it was published und sold together with the collection of architect Kálmán Giergl, then it appeared in Germany in 1956. Since 1957 it has been preserved in the Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe in Hamburg. The type of vessel, technique and style allow the assumption that the cup was made in West Europe, perhaps England or the Low Countries around 1630, originally with another lid ornament. It probably came to Hungary via the wedding of Zsigmond Rákóczi and Henriette of Pfalz in 1651. After the early death of the spouses, probably Zsigmond Rákóczi's mother Zsuzsanna Lórántffy had the pelican created for the cup and gave it as a nuptial present to her nephew László Rákóczi when he married Calvinist Erzsébet Bánffy in 1654.

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Adatok a magyarországi ötvösség történetéhez VI. Nagyszombat (I. rész: 15–17. század)

Addenda to the history of goldsmith's art in Hungary VI. Nagyszombat / Trnava (Part I: 15–17th centuries)

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
András Grotte

Abstract

The paper is a chapter in the systematic exploration of goldsmith's art in historical Hungary. While in another series of publications, the author summarizes the historical information on goldsmith dynasties in various towns, matching it with the extant works. He makes an attempt to redefine the 16–17th century proof-marks. Here, he relies on the registers of Nagyszombat (today: Trnava in Slovakia). In the Addenda he publishes proof-marks and objects who have wrongly attributed to masters from Nagyszombat.

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This is the sixth part of a series of publications about the history of goldsmith's art in Hungary based on archival sources, registrars, citizens’ registers, guild documents, tax registers processed by cities and regions. The goldsmiths and silversmiths revealed by the above documents by name are compared with the old research literature to rectify its data on the one hand, and on the other, goldsmith's marks and objects are attributed to the particular artists. The present publication reviews the history of goldsmith's art in Nagyszombat (today Trnava, Slovakia), the first part of which – the 15–17th century – was released in Művészettörténeti Értesítő 2009/1. Now the equally rich output of the 18–19th centuries is taken stock of, together with the names of several artists. Some published art works are known from public collections, others from private owners or art dealers.

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Kísérlet néhány magyarországi ötvösjegy feloldására XII.

An attempt to solving some Hungarian goldsmith's marks XII

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
András Grotte

Abstract

The study is the new installment of a series running already for 22 years. The author systematically collects masters' marks of goldsmith's ware mostly cropping up in the art trade, trying to identify the towns and masters with the help of earlier research literature (Elemér Kőszeghy, 1936; Ilona P. Brestyánszky, 1977), often correcting the information they provide. The work is complemented by thorough archival research, with all available data about identified goldsmiths in city registers being published. The present paper first identifies the works and marks of Pest goldsmiths (Ferenc József Trautzl around 1780, József Trautzl around 1824–39, János Lehman, 1862, János Krieck, 1829, I. József Pasperger, around 1780), followed by a new master's mark of Wenzel Gretschl of Buda on a work of 1821. He discussed some of them earlier, too; now he calls attention to some forged objects. A separate unit comprises the goldsmithing of Bán (Bánovce, Slovakia) and Rozsnyó (Rožnava, Slovakia) in Trencsén county: in the former town János Oravszky and János Ottó worked almost synchronously (around 1828), while the son of Bán goldsmith Leopold Goldner, Anton, can be documented in Rozsnyó. In addition to 19th century goldsmiths of Gyöngyös (János Goldberger) and Kecskemét (Dávid Auslener), he has data on an 18th century master of Miskolc (Ferenc Szombati, between 1750 and 1795). In Pécs, he attributes a new work to the earlier presented Jakab Posz, then he enriches our knowledge of the goldsmiths of the one-time capital of Hungary, Pozsony with new marks and objects (Fidelis Mayer, József Steinmassl, János Hauck, Mihály Ehrenhoffer, Joannes Gerick, Joseph Weinstabl from the first half of the 19th c.). Finally he introduces the earlier completely unknown goldsmithing in the market town of Tolna through the 19th c. work of Lajos Schulz.

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Adatok a magyarországi ötvösség történetéhez VII. Keszthely, Komárom

Addenda to the history of goldsmith's art in Hungary VII. Keszthely, Komárom

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
András Grotte

Abstract

The article is part of a series of similar title. The author already addressed himself earlier to metalworking in the towns of Keszthely and Komárom, but new archival sources have become accessible. From birth/marriage/death registers and tax registers the names of further goldsmiths could be gleaned, while the family relations of others could be clarified. A specific group of relics, the typical silver chains of Gypsy voivods made around 1850 were successfully tied up with goldsmith József Setosits of Keszthely. Museum objects can be attached to data in the 17th century register data of Komárom: works by György Szentjóby, Master KB. From among the goldsmith's dynasties of the 19th century, the Grünhut family can be traced up to 1944.

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