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  • Author or Editor: András Grotte x
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In the earlier scientific literature dealing with the Hungarian masters’ mark (thus also in the book of Kőszeghy Elemér: Magyarországi ötvösjegyek a középkortól 1867-ig / Merkzeichen der Goldschmiede Ungarns vom Mittelalter bis 1867. Budapest 1936) the data about the smiths of Miskolc was corrupted, because it had been mixed up with the data about the smiths from other cities (eg. Munkács, today Mukačeve, Ucraine). The study includes the revision of the scientific literature about the smiths of Miskolc, and collects with an ambition of completeness all the data related to them. We have relatively few sources dating from the 16th-17th centuries, but the smiths begin to appear in written sources from the 18th century onwards. The appearing names are sometimes related to the works which are still around today. The study details many of these connections. The smiths of Miskolc were working organized into guilds. The Jewish smiths living in the city have joined the guild of masters of Jewish faith which was founded in 1836.

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Going on with a series of articles, I present again some so-far unknown maker’s marks and mark variants in private collections and the art trade, and try to identify them. When already published marks are at issue, Elemér Kőszeghy’s book of marks is referred to, and Ilona P. Brestyánszky’s work is mentioned with the mark’s serial number there when marks of Pest-Buda are discussed. I try to clarify the biography of goldsmiths active in Hungarian towns on the basis of archival research, first of all with parish register data. In the appendix I give a list of gold- and silversmiths named in the registers of the Israelite community of Óbuda between 1851 and 1895, and those in the census of 1850.

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Abstract

The mother-of-pearl cup in a silver mount with a lid adorned with a pelican was first mentioned in the 1704 inventory of the properties of Erzsébet Rákóczi (1645–1707). Presumably inherited from her father László Rákóczi, the goldsmith's object passed to the treasury of the Pálffy family after Erzsébet's death, in 1713, only to disappear from the sources for centuries. In 1907 it was published und sold together with the collection of architect Kálmán Giergl, then it appeared in Germany in 1956. Since 1957 it has been preserved in the Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe in Hamburg. The type of vessel, technique and style allow the assumption that the cup was made in West Europe, perhaps England or the Low Countries around 1630, originally with another lid ornament. It probably came to Hungary via the wedding of Zsigmond Rákóczi and Henriette of Pfalz in 1651. After the early death of the spouses, probably Zsigmond Rákóczi's mother Zsuzsanna Lórántffy had the pelican created for the cup and gave it as a nuptial present to her nephew László Rákóczi when he married Calvinist Erzsébet Bánffy in 1654.

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