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  • Author or Editor: B. A. Howell x
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Abstract

Two series of styrene monomers, one with phosphorus-containing moieties as substituents and the other with substituents containing both phosphorus and nitrogen, have been prepared, characterized, and converted to oligomers. The oligomers contain, in the one case, phosphorus and, in the other, phosphorus and nitrogen. This provides the opportunity to not only assess the impact of the presence of phosphorus on the combustion characteristics of the oligomers but to determine whether or not this impact is enhanced by the presence of nitrogen. The level of residue from thermogravimetry and heat release rate during combustion suggest that the presence of nitrogen may have a small positive impact on the effectiveness of phosphorus flame retardants.

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Abstract

The thermal stability of a commercial triaryl phosphate hydraulic fluid has been assessed using thermogravimetry and pyrolysis. This material is a mixture of triaryl phosphates containing a predominance of triphenyl phosphate. It is volatile at higher temperatures. At temperatures below its boiling point, in the presence of air, it slowly decomposes to evolve phenolic fragments.

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Abstract

Fully substituted 1,3-dioxa-2-siloles contain a strained carbon–carbon bond that will undergo thermolysis at modest temperatures to generate a diradical capable of initiating vinyl polymerization. If the substituents contain flame-retarding moieties, e.g., halogen or phophorus-containing groups, the use of such compounds as initiators serves to incorporate a flame-retarding unit into the polymer mainchain. Both 2,2-dialkyl- and 2,2-diaryl-4,4,5,5-tetra(3,5-dibromophenyl)-1,3-dioxa-2-siloles may be prepared from the appropriate tetra(bromoaryl)-1,2-ethanediol and are obtained as white solids. Thermal decomosition (thermogravimetry) of these materials occurs in two stages. Initial decomposition is observed at about 250 °C and corresponds to the loss of nearly half of the initial sample mass.

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Abstract

The thermal degradation of a series of 1,1,2,2-tetraaryl-1,2-ethanediols has been examined using thermogravimetry (TG) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These compounds are smoothly converted to the corresponding diaryl ketone and diaryl carbinol, i.e., the compounds undergo disproportionation arising from homolytic cleavage of the central carbon–carbon bond. Presumably, cleavage of the carbon–carbon bond generates a radical pair which disproportionates to provide the observed products.

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Abstract  

Organoplatinum antitumor agents are very effective, broad-spectrum drugs used for the treatment of a variety of cancerous conditions. The two most prominent of these, Cisplatin [cis-diamminodichloroplatinum(II)] and Carboplatin [diammino(1,1-cyclobutanedicarboxylato)platinum(II)], are large scale commercial successes. The third, Oxaliplatin [((trans-1,2-diamminocyclohexane)oxalato)platinum(II)], is now commercially available. The administration of all these drugs is accompanied by severe side effects. For Cisplatin, the most debilitating of these is kidney damage and extreme nausea. Several approaches to generate drug-release formulations that might mitigate toxic side effects have been explored. Now, platinum(IV) compounds which are more inert than platinum(II) compounds, and consequently less toxic, but which may be reduced to platinum(II) species within the cell are being evaluated for effectiveness in the treatment of cancer. The thermal stability of several precursors to compounds of this kind has been examined by thermogravimetry. In general, these materials lose ligands sequentially to generate a residue of platinum. This behavior may be generally useful for the characterization of such materials.

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Abstract

A difunctional imide monomer may be produced from 4-nitrophthalic anhydride and m-phenylenediamine. The requisite anhydride may be generated by nitration of phthalimide followed by hydrolysis to the corresponding acid and dehydration. All intermediate compounds have been fully characterized using spectroscopic and thermal methods.

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