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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: B. Vecseri-Hegyes, P. Fodor, and Á. Hoschke

Fermentation of wort is the most critical step of beer production. Fermentation difficulties may be caused by inadequate wort composition, i.e. insufficient supply of trace elements. Wort provides trace elements for yeast. Among them zinc, which is essential for beer fermentation, is not available in the required amount in wort. Zinc utilization in fermentation was studied in beers made with adjunct (maize, barley). Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry was used as analytical method for the determination of zinc concentration. Addition of zinc made the fermentation faster. The best result was achieved at 0.4 mg l-1. Synthesis of aroma compounds was also promoted at this concentration. Concentrations higher than 0.4 mg l-1 did not affect significantly either the fermentation rate or the maximal ethanol concentration. Addition of zinc at the end of wort boiling did not prove to be practical, it is better to supply yeast with zinc.

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: B. Vecseri-Hegyes, P. Fodor, and Á. Hoschke

The most sensitive and time-consuming technological step of beer production is the fermentation of wort. Problems during fermentation will not only prolong production time but it will lead to the deterioration of beer quality. Most often it is due to low zinc concentration of the wort or the yeast. Due to lack of zinc the fermentation lasts longer, composition of fermentation by-products changes, maltose intake slows down, sedimentation ability and heat sensitivity of the yeast increase. In Part I of our work, the factors affecting the degree of zinc supply of wort were examined. During the examination of zinc supply of wort two kinds of beer were produced: all-malt beer and beer with adjunct. Change of zinc concentration was followed throughout the brewing process at every technological step. It was found that concentration of zinc gradually decreases during production of wort, and only a small fraction of the calculated amount appears in it. Wort made with adjunct has even lower zinc concentration than all-malt wort. In all malt wort 3.4%, while in wort containing adjunt only 0.4% of the zinc appeared in the wort. Yeast can absorb only the ionic form of zinc during fermentation, thus we had elaborated a method for the separation of the organic and inorganic form of zinc, which was followed by the determination of the concentration of ionic zinc in wort prior to fermentation.

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In the course of our work we aimed to develop a product from gluten-free raw materials (millet, sorghum and buckwheat) that is similar to beer made of barley malt but is consumable by coeliacs. Our measurements were started by qualification of cereal/pseudo-cereal grains. Next malts were made of them with different steeping, germination and kilning parameters, and their most important quality characteristics were determined. Qualification of grains were done by grading, determination of thousand-kernel and hectolitre weight, and protein content, while malts were examined with congress mashing, Hartong mashing and lauter test, as well. Gelatinization point of the starch found in grains and malts were determined by Brabender amyloviscograph which helped to set the temperature of β-amylase rest in future mashings. The gelatinization points were higher in our samples, than in the barley’s starch.Optimization of mashing was continued with malts that fulfilled requirements needed for brewing. Mashing programs were written for each raw material with the help of our laboratory mashing equipment, and resulting worts were analysed (for extract content), then carbohydrate content was measured by HPLC, α-amylase activity by Phadebas test, and free α-amino nitrogen (FAN) content by the ninhydrin method. Those worts were selected for further fermentation tests that had the highest extract and FAN content, best filtration time and appropriate sensory characteristics. Optimal malting temperatures and time periods, aeration and water uptake were determined, and then the duration and temperature of protein and enzyme rests of mashing were set.The malting process that proved to be the most suitable for brewing requirements (high extract content, good lautering characteristics, high FAN content) has the following parameters: steeping with 25 °C water for 18 h with aeration in every 5 h; germination at 15 °C for 84 h; kilning at 50 °C for 48 h.

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Currently gluten-free beer is not produced in Hungary for coeliacs. The goal of our research was to develop brewery products made of domestically grown millet (Alföldi 1) and buckwheat (Oberon) that are similar to traditional beer of barley malt regarding taste, aroma, consistency, colour, foam stability and alcohol content.On a micromalting equipment malts were made of buckwheat and millet. Beer was produced on pilot plant scale (50 l) with decoction process (mashing program with rests at 50 °C, 65 °C and 72 °C) and was supplemented with a highly heat-stable bacterial α-amylase, a fungal α-amylase and β-glucanase. Malts were evaluated by congress mashing (extract content, extract difference, pH, and colour); wort and final beer analyses were performed as well (pH, extract, iodine test, FAN, colour, bitterness, alcohol and extract content). Finally, sensory characterization was carried out. Difficulties with lautering were encountered during the brewing process with buckwheat. The analytical results indicated that the buckwheat and millet beer had different values compared with a typical barley beer with regard to pH, FAN, fermentability, and total alcohol. The extracts of the buckwheat and millet wort were lower, resulting in a final attenuation of 61.5% and 73.2%.In laboratory experiments optimal temperature of β-amylase found in domestically grown buckwheat (64 °C) and millet (62 °C) was determined by detecting maltose production with HPLC. Data was used to set the rest temperature of the enzyme during mashing. Inhibiting effect of certain substances on proteolytic enzymes was investigated by measuring the extract, FAN, and soluble nitrogen contents. Inhibition was detected in case of both raw materials, although to a different extent. Inhibition is influenced by tannins and polyphenols found in the grain (Chethan et al., 2008).

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