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Abstract  

Focuses on the validity of Lotka's law and the negative binomial distribution model to author productivity data in different time periods in theoretical population genetics speciality. Finds out if there is any relation between applicability of a statistical distribution and the development of speciality. Looks at the linkages between inequality/concentration measures and the development of speciality. Explores the relevance and applicability of the two generalisations, namely Price Square, Root Law and 80/20 Rule to the author productivity data and their relation with development of theoretical population genetics. Finally, a study of the growth of practitioners in the field with different productivity levels is conducted, and the emergence of core authors in the speciality is explored.

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Abstract  

The paper analyses the frequency distribution of scientific productivity of authors active for same lengh of time in theoretical population genetics speciality. The focus of analysis is on two aspects: their actual duration of participation in total research output and the speed at which they are able to produce their research publications.

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Abstract  

Different approaches are introduced for studying the growth of scientific knowledge, as reflected through publications and authors. Selected growth models are applied to the cumulated growth of publications and authors in theoretical population genetics from 1907 to 1980. The criteria are studied on which growth models are to be selected for their possible application in the growth of literature. It is concluded that the power model is observed to be the only model among the models studied which best explains the cumulative growth of publication and author counts in the theoretical population genetics.

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Abstract  

Analyses the growth of funded and collaborative research publications and authors as reflected in selected theoretical population genetics literature from 1956–60 to 1976–80. Indicates that the number of funded and collaborated publications has not proportionally increased along with the growth of total research publications and authors with time, but however, there is a strong correlation between the two. Indicates the extent of multi-authored research publications in different countries, and studies the growth of multi-authored publications from 1956–60 to 1976–80. Studies the impact of funding and collaboration on the productivity of authors over a period of time. Concludes that the authors who are more productive are generally found to be more collaborative and funded. The average productivity per author is observed to be larger in funded and collaborated authors subset and smaller in non-funded and non-collaborated authors subset, than the average productivity per author in the total authors subset in all the five block years studied. There is a systematic increase with time in the average productivity per author in the funded and collaborated authors subset. Studies the nature and type of collaborated research from 1956–60 to 1976–80, and the role of funding. Highlights the research priorities of few important countries in collabortive research. Indicates the collaboration linkages among various countries in transnational collaborative research. Concludes that with time, the focus of research is slowly shifting from internal collaration to domestic and international collaboration, supported by increasing funding from government agencies in theoretical population genetics research.

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Abstract  

The paper discusses the application of three well known diffusion models and their modified versions to the growth of publication data in four selected fields of S&T. It is observed that all the three models in their modified versions generally improve their performance in terms of parameter values, fit statistics, and graphical fit to the data. The most appropriate model is generally seen to be the modified exponential-logistic model.

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Abstract  

The study analyses the distribution of productivity of authors in theoretical population genetics (TPG) as reflected in their publication output from 1881 to 1980 from two different approaches. The internal dynamics of TPG specialty affecting the distribution of the productivity of authors is studied using time cross-sectional type of approach. Here the productivity distribution of authors in 10 time-year blocks and in three phases of the development (1921-50, 1951-65 and 1966-80) of TPG is studied using cohort type of approach. The extent of cumulative advantage acquired by the prolific group of authors over time in TPG is also studied. The paper also analyzes the regularity in the distribution of productivity of various cohorts, having same length of activity, but different periods of participation.

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Abstract  

Traces the growth of collaborated and funded research as reflected in research papers in theoretical population genetics research speciality from 1916–80 through a case study. Analyses the proportion and extent of collaborated papers, averge number of authorship per paper, and collaborative coefficient index of research papers thereby giving an overall perspective of the growth of professionalism in the field. Studies the relation between collaboration, productivity, and funding of research papers in theoretical population genetics. Classifies the total collaborative papers/authors by type of collaboration and studies the trends and shifts in the nature and type of collaborative research over the years.

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Abstract  

A growth model of the journal literature is proposed and applied to the growth of the literature of theoretical population genetics (1850–1980).

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Scientometrics
Authors: B.M. Gupta, Suresh Kumar, S. Sangam, and C.R. Karisiddappa

Abstract  

The main objectives of this study are: (a) to find the applicability of selected growth models to the growth of publications in six sub-disciplines of social sciences, namely anthropology, economics, history, political science, psychology, and sociology in the world; and (b) to verify the criteria for selecting the most appropriate growth model suggested by Eggheand Rao (1992).

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